Pittsburgh Post-Gazette from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on July 24, 1948 · Page 20
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Pittsburgh Post-Gazette from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania · Page 20

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Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Issue Date:
Saturday, July 24, 1948
Page:
Page 20
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SI I J I I W M Ye Old Summer Opera SOUVENIRS of Raymond M. Smith, retired printing executive, include a number of rare old theater programs. Among them is a "programme" for the 1896 summer season of the Casino Comic Opera Company, which held forth in the Casino theater, Schenley Park. The Casino was "The only theatre in the United States erected for the sole purpose of p r e s e nting lovers of music with standard and comic operas during the hot summer m o n th s." Harry Davis was managing director. Some of the 1S96 offer- Charlie Darner ings were The Black Hussar," "Erminie," "Chimes of Normandy" and The Bohemian Girl." Besides the regular operatic performances there were "sacred concerts' every Sunday afternoon and evening with vocal and instrumental numbers by Prof. Eugene Smith's Unrivaled Orchestra." Air-Condilioned The old Casino, believe it or not, was air-conditioned, too. Mr. Smith's "programme'' brags: This Theatre is cooled by patent devices including an ice machine, the capsvciry of 150 tons. Four large blowers keep np a constant supply of air that has been reduced to temperature of 65 degrees." r Free Parking - , Oldtime summer opera fans who purchased reserved seats before 5 p. m. were furnished with "car tickets good on any of the lines of the Consolidated Traction Company to and from the Casino." And there were special parking facilities for those who preferred to provide their own transportation. Get a load of this thoughtful courtesy announced in the program: "Bicycles can be checked, free of harge, before entering the Casino." - Others Other oldtime programs in Mr. Smith's collection include Success By Elmer Roger Babson has said that the secret of success is: "Be willing to go the second mile." Mr. B a b-son can no doubt give hundreds of examples of how this success secret helped individuals and businesses to achieve success. My own files have so Elmer Wheeler many "case histories" that it is difficult to pick out one to illustrate this success secret. But I think the story of George S. Parker will do very well. Many years ago Parker was a clerk in a pen shop. Fountain pens were new at the time. And many of them failed to work. The pens this young man sold were not guaranteed. He was tinder no obligation to repair them. He "only worked there." (f it t fJL Goren on Bridge By Charles WEEKLY QUIZ Q. 1 As dealer you hold: AKQ6 ?63 OA K J 3 AQ4 What is your opening bid? Q. 2 As South you hold: 46 3 2 ? OK J 10 7 54 2 7 5 4 The bidding has proceeded: West North East South 1 20 Pass ? What do you bid? Q. S Partner opens with 1 apade, you hold: 5 ?Q54 OQJ53 497642 What do you bid? Q. .4 As South you hold: AJ765 OA 7 5 OK94 AQ The bidding has proceeded: South West North East 1 Pass 2NT Pass What do you bid now? Q. 5 As South you hold: AKJ65 CQ7 OA94 A75 The bidding has proceeded: North East South West VO Pass 1 Pass 8 Pass ? Q. 6 Opponents vulnerable. As South you hold: 5 OKQ964 OKJ53 J 6 3 The bidding has proceeded: West North East South 1 Pass Pass ?. What do you do? Q. 7 As South you hold: K10652 C9 0A3-AKJ42 ' The bidding has proceeded: North East South West Pass 10 - - DbL . Pass 2? Pass 2 ' ' Pass 4 " Pass ? t : What do you bid now? - -tr -ir , Q. 3 As South you hold: 8 7 ?A K 10 3 2 ' 03 2 47 6 4 3 three from the Alvin (1896-98) "Handsomest Theatre in America;" a couple from the Grand Opera House (1897-99), and one front the Duquesne (1897-98), which was offering "Monte Cristo Romantic Drama by Alex. Dumas." Police! G. Earl Allen, business representative of the Operating Engineers, looked inquiringly at his secretary the other day when, as she began outlining his appointments, she observed: "You'll be lucky to keep out of jail today." His schedule called for meetings with W. G. Hooker, secretary of the Newspaper Publishers Association; Samuel Robb, of the Labor Standards Committee, and James Steel, of the Cold Storage Industries. Hooker, Robb and Steel! Favorite Model When Frank Freas, art director of the Bulletin Index, was a GI student at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh, his favorite model in the life classes there was pretty dark-eyed Nina Vaccaro, 19-year-old Pitt student. She still is. Fact, she is now Mrs. Freas. They were married last Saturday. Fragments C. A. Landau, past president of the Pittsburgh Builders Exchange, celebrates another birthday anniversary today. . . . James McEwan, beauty preparations sales laanager, is back from Detroit for vacation. . . , He has found an apartment in Detroit and his family will join him there in the fall. ... Evelyn Cooke, the dancer, is vacationing in Buffalo. ... Dr. James H. Greene of the Chamber of Commerce is in the Middle West trying to woo new industries to Pittsburgh. . . . Secrets Wheeler But when . customers came back and said "it won't work" he worked on them until they would work. This repair work was done free and on his own time. He only wanted to help his customers. But he became such an expert repairman that he soon knew more about fountain pens than the manufacturer. "I can make a better pen than this myself," he thought. In his spare time he did perfect a new type pen, scraped up $80.00 for a patent, and went into the pen business. That clerk who went the extra mile was George S. Parker, founder of the Parker Pen Company, whose pens are now sold in every country on earth except Russia and Japan. Whatever your job try "going the second mile." It not only makes you feel better. It not only makes your boss and your customers like you better. It also pays off. H. Goren - The bidding has proceeded: North East South West Pass Pass 1S 14 Dbl. 2NT Pass 3NT Pass Pass Pass What is your opening lead? Answers to these questions will appear on Monday. Bridge News At the Mt. Lebanon Duplicate Club the winners were: First Mrs. J. Stanley Brown and Davd Allison; Mr. J. Stanley Brown and Edward Bennett. Second Harry Kelso and R. L. Hammerly; Mrs. E. J. Buckingham and Carl Schick. At the Pittsburgh Bridge Association monthly master point game the winners were: First Dr. Don Grove and C. A. Noe; Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Lawrence. Second C E. Young and Mrs. Myrtle Jeremias and Ivan Half and Claire Tiernan. Section B, First Mr. and Mrs. Harry Glick; Eugene Klawier and George Gibbs. Second Mrs. Albert J- Ruth and Mary Donaldson; Mrs. Margaret Dempsey and A. A. Pope. At the master point duplicate game at the Titlow Hotel the winners were: First Mrs. W. O. White and Mrs. Sam Haxrold; Miss Annabelle Runner and Ed ,Feeney. Second Aaron Ritter and Louis Goldberg; ; Mrs.- WVI Byers, Jr,, and Mrs. Altha? E. Francis. . ; ,, ; ".f--t ' At the Hotel Henry:the winners were; First E. C. Donahy and A.A. Pope; Mrs. Arch Fine-man nd Mrs;, R. J. Henderson. Second Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Glick; Myron Swartz and Jack Simon. Lyons Den By Leonard Lyons NEW YORK "-CHALLENGE : Simon Gould, the vice presidential candidate of , the American Vegetarian Party, lives on West Forty-seventh street, New York, near the Gus-Andy's Somer-s e t Restau-ant. Although his wife and son dine there r e g u 1 a rly, Gould refuses to patronize the place be-cause it serves meat. Leonard Lyons . . . This week the restaurateurs will advertise: "Simon Gould does not eat here because our steaks are too tempting." LEGEND: In reviewing Evelyn Waugh's new book, the editors of Time stated that when Waugh and Randolph Churchill were in Yugoslavia during the war they reported that Tito really was a woman. . . . Tito, at the time, was operating under several aliases because he wanted his identity kept secret. One day, on the Isle of Vis off the Dalmatian coast, the Britishers went swimming. Tito arrived, wearing his heavy uniform. Although it was a warm day, Tito was the only one there who refused to shed his clothes and go swimming. Waugh and Churchill joked about this, and Waugh suggested: "Maybe he's a woman?" That's how the legend began. CHANGE: . The sudden switch of Leo Durocher from the Brooklyn Dodgers to the New York Giants has had repercussions at the offices of United Artists. Laraine Day,, the film star-wife of Durocher, always accompanies her husband on the road-tours of the ball club. United Artists' press department had arranged a series of interviews for her,, in connection with the movie, "My Dear Secretary." These interviews were with newspapers in the National League cities, timed for the Dodgers' road tour. United Artists now is busy re-arranging the interviews, to fit them into the New York Giants' schedule. SUCCESS: One of the national magazines published a series of articles about the most successful men in America. The question asked of them was: "To what do you attribute your, sucess?" The magazine refused to publish the reason ascribed by Albert D. Lasker, who said that he became successful as the result of a dice-game. . . . When he was 18 years old, Lasker got a job with Lord & Thomas. ' He didn't like it, and was about to quit. Then he played in a dice- you'll enjoy "Portraits" look jor them in the Daily Magazine in your LARGEST CIRCULATIONS Of ANY PITTSBURGH PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE: -What Do About Men and Women? By ErnestE. Blau Who Are More Suspicious Men or Women? - Not long ago a doctor got a divorce because his wife was too suspicious of him. He said it was bad enough to have her pawing through his medical bag, looking for love notes but when she insisted on going out on sick calls with him at 3 a. m. that did it! Suspicion and jealousy, I'm told, show feelings of insecurity, inferiority and a lot of little gals have feelings like that. And who wouldn't when the opposite sex can be your whole meal ticket .'. . can' earn a.much better living than you can . . . and roam around much more freely and get into more temptation? But don't think the men, for all their seeming confidence, are so sure of their hold on the women, either. Many a fellow feels inferior to some girl. If he feels she's more clever than he, the more he's crazy about her, the less he trusts her. That's why Othello strangled Desde-mona and why the Crusaders locked up their girl friends before they rode away to fight the infidel. So it's probably a draw. In fact, a little suspicion may be a good thing now and then both sexes can be too darn trusting. I read where an upstate woman Your Stars Today By Marion Drew What to Expect Today Sun in Leo General Tendencies Best conditions today hover about outdoor sports, exercise and travel, this general trend lasting for the renraining days of this month. The business influences still hang fire and do not seem to pick up speed until toward the middle of next month, although those born near the second week of either December or April can find this day, fairly fortunate. The moon is now in the sign Pisces and leans toward emotional rather than practical impulses. Perhaps the evening might' show enjoyment socially, but only after some slight misunderstanding. If It's Your Birthday The Fall and Winter months look best for you during your next game and lost $1,500. He had to borrow money to pay this loss. This meant that he had to stay with Lord & Thomas until he earned enough to repay the $1,500 loan. He stayed with the firm, learned to like the job, and was there for 44 years. After the first 10 years in the job he became the owner of Lord & Thomas and made it one of the largest and most powerful advertising agencies in the world. I From chasing criminals for the F.B.I, to chasing rhymes ' for Post-Gazette readers that's the path taken by the life of James J. Metcalfe who writes the daily verse features, "Portraits." And he doesn't mind it at all. For four years an F.B.I, man, he also practiced law before turning to newspaper work where his 1937 expose of the German Bund won him national acclaim. Then, when he discovered his happy knack for putting into pleasant verse what all of us feel but can so seldom say, ' he took to writing "Portraits' exclusively. Now, except for a few lecture trips, he spends all his time in his modest Dallas (Texas home with his pretty wife and three childre two boys and a girl. And they've given him many a "Portrait" inspiration. In the past year 35,367 readers ordered copies of the Post-Gazette "Portraits" booklet still another reason why far more people look to the Post-Gazette than any other Pittsburgh daily newspaper in history. SATURDAY, JULY 24, You Know was having her thirteenth -child when her unemployed husband ran off with the 16-year-old baby sitter. The wife said un- comprehendingly, "He was al ways such a perfect husband. He even shared the relief checks with me when they came." And in Bristol, England, a man's wife, without explanation, left him eating his Sunday dinner alone, and went upstairs. After he leisurely finished his jam tart he went upstairs tooand there was a strange man in their bed, eating dinner from a tray. year. You have a chance to make money needs work, but I guess you can rise to the occasion. You are usually fond of ease, but when you see that you can gain good rewards, you can put your many talents to work on the job. The Leo men and women like praise, luxury and enjoyment like these things well enough to exert themselves to get them if it comes to the worst. By the way, don't place too much dependence upon romances in here; you are apt to be disappointed. Today's Watchword Well, I heard a young girl actually weep the other day because she was not beautiful. Someone had told her so, rather harshly, and she was in the midst of realizing that she was not a Venus. But how many beauties are there in a group, and are they always the most popular? No, for they are usually conceited, unwilling to be obliging and also somewhat apt to think themselves superior to other human beings. The girl who is most generally liked is the adaptable and merry companion; there is no substitute for good humor. Remember, girl3, that there are some men wise enough to know that a heart of gold is worth a dozen bright red lipsticks-they say so among, themselves. by Nato he painfs "Portraits" with words etealfe wMmm . mm DAILY NEWSPAPER 194S Hi'ya, Stranger ! NEW YORK Welcome to our village fair! If you are one of the many ordinary citizens who feel the urge but lack the leisure to follow your wander- lust, you'U find Manhattan a heaven of a haven. The f e el of foreign places and wide open spaces awaits you in a minimum of min-u t e s and within a. mat ter of blocks. Dorothy Kilgallen For unending variety is the spice of life in these parts. Here we boast every type of spot, every tempo of existence. If you can't fulfill your longing for far-flung travel, enjoy our fun-filled facsimile of some part of the globe to which you've longed to trot. You won't need passage on plane, strain or boat come along with us, travel light by taxi, subway, "L" or bus. You can go around the world in a week in this town. Want to See America First? Then eat hearty and quench your thirst at Trader Tom's, on West Forty-eighth street between Sixth and Seventh. It's one of Gotham's newest restaurants, but it's brought the West to our East with its rootin' too tin' Texas theme. Podner, Voice of Broadway -Ey Dorothy Kilgallen- it's enough to make a lone cowboy feel he's home on the range just to set eye on the rugged riggings that dominate those diggings. There's bonest-to-goodness cacti (every imaginable variety) planted in abundance atop a ledge bordering the whole ranch - type room. Southerners made unhappy by the recent Demcoratic convention can dull their disappointments and enjoy below-the-Ma-son-Dixon-Line home cooking at Little Old. Mansion, a sho'nuff Dixie dining place located at 244 East Fifty - first street, in a house filled with charm and hospitality, Southern style: From this magnolia hideout you can span the Atlantic with 52 for your ideas we print Write Jerrj UnjjeB co The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Chaet for dental. PATIENTS TD POINT TO FOR QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS WHEN MOUTH IS HELD WIDE OPM.- Afss Saw Gtavs, r lots of ras in little time Yes, yea ca say a lot en a telephone... even when yen fee:? calls briof. And vizi yen ib keep briof, you leave tb tzzr epen fcr hco.7.:n2 ttt tbt . yoa cigfet net vci to riss. - And .... you'll blj rsb service better fzi yczr paty-foe nrfgKrs. Tfcrfl appreciate it. And they'll Co tb same for yea! T12 CTU. TtlXPIIOMZ COMPANY Of PENNSYLVANIA nrrsBURGirs prosperity is your security Jus a hop, skip anTTTNl to West Fifty - fan? Walk a few ?tep enth avenue and W upon a brownstone L its bottom floor flim-T not brightly, just , big family dinner pa. progress. This is L ttlk , ..uua uu & U t V " I Italian restaurant, rav fonnal-nd a famuV . J"? deed, because Joe his Hife MarguentTS o iu anomer Dart lowed buUdinr lowed building. Like Hungary? vPPi . Then it's the Hungarian qE" for you. On Second nestled betwePn b and Eightieth. v.wnrl housing the lively spi5 : a place of gypsy ni, topaz-hued Tokay, and jj? is designed to delight thei """sanan goulash. rTl peppers, wonderful baked the-nrmisp ctn.j.i. t " siiuueis, mention noodlps 2S Stick around awha. you? We've got lot J glamour of France, pZ, its pArpfivii cm I Why, I could go on

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