The Lincoln Star from Lincoln, Nebraska on September 29, 1946 · Page 12
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The Lincoln Star from Lincoln, Nebraska · Page 12

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Sunday, September 29, 1946
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2-B LINCOLN SUNDAY JOURNAL AVD STAB September 29, 1916 The Firing Line By Norris Anderson MINNEAPOLIS, Minn —Once again University of Nebraska j football is back with the fans ... It used to be that Corn­ husker football teams constituted an autumn bible that was digested by every walking child and adult over the state , • . The Minnesota traveling squad first felt the revamp in fan interest at the huge station rally . . . Cornhusker spirit was there in the old Rose Bowl tradition with fans swarming over all visible terrain and screaming enough to make up for all pep- less wartime rallies ... An hour train wait in the Omaha station again proved thbt Nebraska football is our biggest fall item . . . When the news got around that the bunch of huskies running around the depot made up the Cornhusker squad, the rubber necking was under way . . . Those gadders whose faces had been spread across the sport sheets were especially cornered by the junior fans for autographs , . . The Omaha lads, Sam Vacanti, Jack Hazen, Tom Novak, etc., signed until their pencils turned blue . . . But amiable Bernie Masterson, the Husker coach, was spotted and pestered by the autograph hounds more than any of his ' gridders , . . Something about the Husker coach that brings out , a personal “Hy ya, Bernie"’ from even the smallest urchin . , . Seeing the Huskers off in Lincoln was an “N” man named Danny Presnell, the six-year- old ward of the Glenn Presnells . . . With his red Cornhusker Jersey intact, Danny was making with the rah-rah on the cheer leaders platform as well as sending his backfield coach pop off to Gopherland. A lot of kidding was directed toward the hat worn by Al Kir, lin, the big end from Northeast high ... Al was featuring a topper that was in the best tradition of deacons and professors. Waiting in the Omaha depot to greet their football sons were Mr. and Mrs. John Hazen and the Rubin Schleigers . . . The Hazen ward, Jack, was the Cornhusker game co-captain and Bob Schleiger is one of Masterson’s end hopefuls . . . Mr. Schleiger was nearly tempted to board the train despite a slated week-end business trip to Kansas City . . . Led by the baritones of guard Freddy Lorenz and tackle Rog Johnson, the Huskers are developing a choir that promises to enliven future train rides . . . Choir masters Lorenz and Johnson had the boys stepping through some lively bars of “You Are My Sunshine” and “Shine On Harvest Moon” . . . Most promising of the embryo songsters was big Carl Samuelson . . . He’s better at knocking over an opposing back, but he does know how to juggle a tune . . . Juggle, that is ... A big attraction at the Lincoln send-off rally w£s Sam .Wrong Nats Spoil Ferriss’ Bid For No. 26 Nebraska’s Cornhusker* will be seeking their 25th football triumph in their 31st meeting with Kansas State college at Memorial stadium Saturday. In a series that started back in {1911 the Nebraskans have won 24 games, lost only four and tied I two. Since Kansas State Inaugurated {the pigskin sport as a part of its athletic program in 1890, the Wildcats have had 15 coaches at the i helm. The first was A. Cavanaugh, 1890-97; W. P. Williamson, 11898; F. G. Moulton, 1899-1902; 1 A. A. Booth, 1903-04; Mike I Ahearn, 1905-11; Guy Lowman, 1912-14; Johhny Bender, 1915-16; E. G. Cleavenger, 1917-20; Char hey Bachman, 1921-28; Bo McMil ;lin, 1929-33; Lynn Waldorf, 1934; !Wes Fry, 1935-39; Hobbs Adams 1940-41 and 1946; Ward Haylett 11942-44; and Lud Fiser, 1945. BOSTON. (ZP). A three-run eighth inning gave the Washing-! ton Nationals a 4-3 win over the Boston Red Sox Saturday and robbed Dave Ferriss of his 26th victory. The Sox were leading 3-0 when Ferriss turned over the pitching assignment to Lefty Mickey Harriss in the fifth. Wally Moses batted in all three the Boston runs, two in the third with a single and one in the fifth with his sixth homer of the of season. Wash. kb h o ll Horton »b h o rn Hob son 2b 4 0 6 3,Moss* rf 110 0 Lewis rf 6 3 2 I Metkortch rf 4 0 I 4 arse# lf 4 0 1 ODMagglo cf 3 0 3 0 Vernon lb 6 2 9 I (Culberson cf 10 3 0 Spence cf 4 3 2 0 Williams lf Sill Travis 3b 4 0 1 elMoBrid* lf 10 0 0 Evans c 4 14 OIDoerr 2b 3 0 2 3 Hitchcock ss 3 I I 2!autterid** 2b I I 0 0 SAILOR BLASSIE. Joe Dtisek Here Against Blassie In Mat Feature Joe Dusek, one of the infamous “Dirty Duseks” of Omaha, will appear in the main event of Wednesday’s rassle card at the fairgrounds 4-H arena. • • • OPPOSING Joe and carrying the best wishes of all local Dusek- haters will be Sailor Blassie, conqueror of villainous Jack Conley in last week’s card. This feature will be the usual two out of three falls with a 90 minute time limit Popular Gene Bowman, muscular ex-gridder from Nashville, Tenn., meets the Black Panther of Kansas City in a semifinal bout which could easily steal the show. Bulldog Danny Plechas, burly Omahan who put out some good action against Bowman last Wednesday, tangles with Stanley Mysljek, the Bearded Mormon from Salt Lake City, in the curtain raiser. Starting time is 8:30. J On Tho Spot ss Do your clothes look untidy because of stubborn specks of dirt? Then try our modern dry cleaning technique , . . Guaranteed to make clothes spotless. ’'Lincoln's Busy Cleaners" ZIMMERMAN CLEANERS & DYERS 2-2203 2355 O St. r DINE In Cool Comfort Al Tho Spencer Steak House AIR CONDITIONED Delirium, Juicy CORN FED STEAK BOAST TURKEY or Golden Brown FRIED CHICKEN HINNERS You’ll find these and many other deliciously prepared foods on our menus seven days a week. For a Complete Meal or a Sandu'ich come to — SPENCER STEAK HOUSE 1425 South St. Open from ll A. M. to 1:30 A. M. Vacanti’s infant daughter . . . Young Miss Vacanti was surrounded by admirers. Center Joe Partington, end Ed Nyden and halfback Pat Rooney were talking over old times with a raft of Minnesota gridders when the train arrived in Minneapolis . . . Joe and Ed were V-12 teammates of Herb Hein, Herman Frickey, Charley Dellago and Larry Halenkamp at Northwestern in 1S43 . . . Rooney, as a naval trainee in 1945, was a Gopher backfield regular during the latter half of the season. One thing noted about this current Cornhusker squad is their congeniality . . . The lads have a good time together and keep plenty of good humor in the air . . . The hope is they find enough to be happy about throughout the season... They’re calling him “Red Husing” Schwartzkopf now . . . Guard Eddie was MC for an Omaha radio broadcast during the train wait there , . Some Schwartzkopf lingo: “Now folks, I want you to meet “Bird-legs” Thompson (quarterback Dick)” . . . Also: “Galloping Junior Collopy and Little Joe Partington.” ... Ed has a label for all of them. The initial game with the Ag­ gies, as they were called in the early days, was in 1911. Nebraska. leading by a skimpy 3-0 score at the half, bounded back In the last two periods to chalk up a 50-0 triumph. Owen Frank made a run of 105 yards and George Racely romped across from 48. 59 and 75 yards out. The Huskers won in the mud, 30 to 6, in 1912 and again in 1913 by a 24-6 margin, the battle featuring Warren How ard’s sensational punting. • • • Herb Potter was the NU stand out in 1914 with an 80 yard punt return and Dick Rutherford’s all around play featured Nebraska 31-0 victory in 1915. The 1914 margin was the same, 31-0. I Dr. Ted Riddell of Scottsbluff was a big factor in the Scarlet 1916 win, the NU end scooping up a fumble and running 70 yards for one of the touchdowns. The final count was 14-0, • • • The two schools did not meet on the gridiron again until 1922 when Charley Bachman, present Michigan State mentor, was at the helm. The Wildcats completed 21 out of 43 passes but lost, 21 to 0. Sed Hartman dazzled in Nebraska’s 34-12 canter in 1923 and the Huskers, making their first trip to Manhattan, brought home a 24-0 verdict topped by Al Bloodgood’s 40 yard drop kick for a field goal, in 1924. The 1925 mudder ended in a scoreless tie and the 1926 game went to the Huskers 2 to 0 on Bobby Stephens’ 30 yard field goal. Evard Lee, Jug Brown,’ Glenn Presnell and Blue Howell paced the Huskers to a 33 0 romp in 1927. Iowa State Bows 41 to 9 To Wildcats BY CHARLES DUNKLEY. EVANSTON, III. (/Pi. Northwestern’s Wildcats opened their 11946 football season with a smashing debut Saturday, burying the Cyclones of Iowa State under a 41 to 9 score before a shirt-sleeved (crowd of 41,000. THE CYCLONES registered a I field goal in the first period to CATHEDRAL’S SIX-MAN CLUB— Here is the Cathedral Bluebirds who last Sunday knocked off St. Mary’s of Grand Island, defending six-man champions, and will travel to Assumption this week Back row: (left to right) Father Kadelka, athletic director, Phil Becker, Ken Lohmier, Dan Carson, Phil Brushahan, Chick Farris, Jim Jackson, Clarence Rice, Dennis Sweeney, R<»i^y L<T- coco, Sandy Silverio, head coach. Front row: Earl Webb, Bert Cook, Lennie Lococo, Jack Bceth- nam, Bill Weyant. (Journal-Star Photo.) Wynn p 4 113 York lh Higgins 3b Russell 3b Wisner c Pattee e Ferries p Harris p Zuber p 3 16 2 2 0 0 1 10 2 0 2 13 0 2 0 3 1 2 110 10 10 0 0 0 0 Huskers Touts 37 ll 27 141 Totals 33 8 27 12 Washington ........................OOO OOI OM—4 Boston ...............002 010 000-3 Runs: Robertson, Lewis. Vsmon. Spence, Moses, Wagner, Ferris, v Error: Pesky 2. Runs batted in: Vernon 2, Evans 2, Moses 3. Two bass hit: lewis, Farrlss. Home run: Moses. Stolen base: play: Lewis to Robertson to Hitchcock; play: Lswls to Robertoan to Hitchcock: Peaky to Doerr to York. Left on base: Washington 9, Boston 6. Base on balls: Oft Wvnn I, Harris I. Zuber 2. Struck out: By Wynn 4, Ferriss 2. Harris I, Zuber 2. Hits: Off Ferriss 5 in 5 Innings: Harriss 6 in 2 1/3; Zuber none in 12/3. Losing pitcher; Harris. Tigers Sjtank Tribe DETROIT. hP). Fireballer Bob Feller watched from the bench Saturday as the Detroit Tigers scored an easy 7 to 3 victory over his Cleveland Indian mates. Thus Rapid Robert left to the final day of the season his attempt to break Rube Waddell’s modern major league record of 343. strikeout Cleveland Moss 3b 'onway ss Robinson lb Edwards rf W'asdell rf Mitchell cf Seerey lf Mack 2b Weigel c Heganc Flanigan p Lemon p Wood ling ab h o a! Detroit 4 0 1 6 Lake ss 4 0 1 2 Upon ss 4 3 15 I Kell 3b 3 0 0 0 Mullin rf IOO OIGreenberg lb 4 3 0 0 Moore lf 2 0 1 lavers cf 4 13 7 Bloodw’th 2b 2 12 OlSwift C IOO O ’Whits p I 0 0 0| I 0 I 31 I 0 0 01 ab h o a 110 0 3 12 2 3 2 0 2 4 0 2 1 4 17 0 4 12 0 2 0 4 0 4 2 2 6 3 17 0 2 0 12 Pf Now .... is the time to have that Felt Hat Cleaned & Blocked Nebraska clinched its first Big Six title with an 8-0 verdict in 1928 as Cliff Ashburn marked up the only touchdown on a Mss fron Claude Rowley. The Huskers squeezed out a 10-6 w-in at Manhattan in 1929 and lost their first game to the Manhattan squad in 1930 on a long pass to Tall Henry Cronkite and a field goal by Eldon Auker. The final count was IO to 9. • • • Bullet Brown’s 70 yard punt return turned defeat into victory at Manhattan in 1931 with the Huskers getting the nod, 6 to 3. Hub Boswell went over for the only touchdown In 1932 and in 1933 Hub set up the pins for Sauer to go over with a 59 yard run. Masterson added the clincher on a kick from placement. The score was 9 to 0. • • • Kansas State won its second game from the Huskers and the Big Six crown with a 19-6 win in 1934. Nebraska led 6-0 at the half but Stoner, Elder and Ayres ushered the Wildcats to a victory for Pappy Waldorf in the last two periods. The 1935 game at Manhattan ended in a scoreless tie but in 1936 Dana Bible got revenge with a 40 to 0 triumph that saw Cardie and Sam Francis at their best. Ron Douglas led the scoring parade with two touchdowns. The Husk ers won in the snow on Lowell English’s placekick in 1937 while Jack Dodd and .Roy Petsch car ried the Huskers to a 14-7 win the following season. Totals 32 8 24 201 Totals 30 9 27 13 Wooding batted for Weigel in sixth Cleveland ......................................IJJ} JJ3 OOO 3 Detroit ...........................................010 140 10* Runs: Robinson 2, Mitchell, KrtL JMullin Greenberg, Moore, Even 2, Blood worth Error: Moas. Conway, Walden, Upon! Runs batted In: Robinson 2. Swift 2. Bloodwort!!. Greenberg 2, Moore. Two base hit: Mitchell, Lake, Greenberg. Lame run: Robinson 2, Bloodwort^ Stolen base: Mack, Weigel. Sacrifice: White 2. Double play: Conway to Mack to Robinson; Upon to Blood worth to Greenberg; Mullin t o Swift; White to Llpon to Greenberg. Left on base: Cleveland 5, Detroit 8. Base on balls: Off Flanigan 5. Lemon 2, White 3 Struck out: By Flanigan 2. White 4. Hita: Off Flanigan 8 In 5 Innings; Lemon 3 In 3. Wild pitch: Flanigan. ' pitcher: Flanigan. (Continued from Page 1-B.) advance with a ten yard sprint Into pay territory over left tackle. An 18 yard punt return by Gopher Jack McNeill to the Nebraska 22 yard line set up the final Gopher touchdown. Two quick darts into the line by Fullback Jim Malosky, a 17 year old, carried to the eight yard stripe. From there Mark Heffelfinger sped around left end for the score with one minute, 15 seconds of play remaining. Ralph McAllister’s conversion attempt failed. • • • FAUNCE was the heaviest offensive gun on the field. The lithe 170 pounder from Fergus Falls, Minn., passed with uncanny skill, hitting ll of his 12 aerial attempts and running for 58 yards in 14 outings aground. Bill Moomey was the top Cornhusker rusher with 61 yards in eight attempts, backed by Hutton’s 47 yards In eight tries. Defensive mainstays were Tom Novak, Joe Partington and Sam Vacanti. With Minnesota blocking splitting holes in the U.N. forward wall, the trio of line backers saw a busy afternoon. Long’s punting was a bright feature. The big Blair halfback averaged 31.6 yards in booting nine punts during the day. Only serious Cornhusker injury was the broken nose received by Vacanti early in the second quarter. Gritty Sam, however, donned a nose guard and returned I action in the second half. Nebraska Minnesota Hazen (OC) ..............I*...........................^.°.ran.t roOTBflLL State College Dome ll. Peru 9. Big Six Minnesota SS, Nebraska 9. Army SI, Oklahoma 7. Missouri 18, Ohio State 1». North western 41, Iowa State 9. Big Nine Midwest Notre Dame 26, Illinois t. Michigan II, Indiana 9. Iowa 16, Purdue 0. East Harvard 7, Conneetlent 6. Dartmouth S. Holy Crone 9. Clarkson 7, Rochester 6. Navy 7, Villenova 0. Rhode Island 14. Maine IS. Buffalo 40, Moravian 6. Coast Gourd SS, RPI 9. Slippery Rock 0, Westminster 9. St. lawrence 14, Union 0. Washington A Jefferson 9, Bethany ®Indiana <Pe.> Tchrs. 20, St. Vincent 7 West Virginia State 31, Winston-Salem Tehra. 9. Potomac State IS, Concord State 9. Muhlenberg 32, lafayette 20. Vale SS. Merchant Marine 9. Brown 14, Cnnlslus 7. Columbus IS, Rutgers 7. Cornell Si, Bucknell 0. Gettysburg 19, I-ehlgh 14. Pittsburgh SS, West Virginia 7. Susquehanna IS, C.C.N.Y. 7. New Hampshire IS, Colby 6. Hates 6. Massachusetts State 0. Navy Plebes 32. Iowa Prcnight 6. Virginia State 12. Allen 6. Cortland 6S, Bergen 6. Virginia V. 71, Hampden Sidney 0. Niagara SI, Valparaiso 0. I a) wet I Textile 9, Norwich 0. Michigan State 42, Wayne 6. Ohio IL ti, Murray Stale 7. ohio Wesley aa 27. lase 0. Boller 19. Charleston lehrs. 12. Manchester 9. Hose Poly 7. Monmouth 26. Parsons 0. Illinois State IO, Michigan Nnrmal 6. North Michigan Stale 9, Oshkosh 0. Akron V. SI. lawrence Tech IS. Miami, O.. 42, Memphis ATC 0. Dayton 21, Wichita 0. Macomb Tehrs. 21, Illinois Col. 9. Mncalcyter 19, St. Diet 6. North. Illinois 49. Elmhurst 9. CW 1r Augustine 9. Hall Stale 27, Indiana Central 9. Wheaton SI, CoMtrdla 6. St. Norbert Col. 19. Whitewater Tehrs. It DePeuw 19, lawrence 19. Dubuque 2, Knox 6. Milwaukee Tehrs. IS, Carroll IS. South Dakota 19, Yankton IS. He a 3 to 0 lead, and scored their only touchdown in the fourth. They managed to get inside Northwestern’s 20-yard line only three times. They were badly ©ut- auled, making only eight first downs to 16 for Northwestern and gaining 126 yards on the ground to 253 for the ’Cats. • • • Don Burdon, Wildcat quarterback, heaved two touchdown passes In the second period, the first for ll yards to Frank Aschenbrenner, formerly of Great I JI k es, and the second for 20 yards to Jimmy Holland, Negro freshman end from Rock Island, III. In between, Bill Hunt, ’Cat halfback, crossed from the five yard line. • • rn In the third, Wiltgen made a ^ blazing 43-yard gallop down the sidelines after taking a pass from Quarterback Carle. Another spectacular run of 26 yards was accomplished by Art Murakowskt, for Northwestern’s final marker. . YIU SCHWALL, Northwestern’s halfback, ’converted foul out of five after touchdown placements. South Trimoiff IS, Georgia Tech 9. North Carolina Stat* IS, Duke 9. North Carolina 14, VPI 14. No. Carolina Col. St, Delaware State 9 south Carolina ti, Newberry 0. Kart Tenn. Trhrx. 14. Tuneulum 9. Knoxville Col. 21. Swift Memorial 8. Howard IS, Bluefield State 8. Vanderbilt SA. Ten ne* vee Tech 7, rind Bragg 14, Cherry Polnl Marine Flyer. It. _ Mississippi State 41. Chattanooga 7. Shaw 26. Fayette Ville Trio*. 9. Alabama 7, Tule ne 8. PM. .St., ll. Iowa Stat# Wtltsl# ..... lo!* ................ Wright ..... Bchoel .......... Ethlngton ,. Fathauar ... Koilinger ... Farts! ...... Norman ... Weiser ............ Don Laun .. Iowa stat# Northwestern Iowa State Scoring • ti- .rt., ,r*. ,qs. .Ii. .n. .ti. Northwestern ....... Oorekt .......... Ivy P#pauw .... parwuan . DI Francesca ........ Bawl* WIRgen ................. Carla Atchenbrenner Schweil ....... Evarlet 3 0 0 •- 9 .0 20 14 7—41 (Touchdown), Don Southwest Texas 76. Colorado 6. Oklahoma A. a M. 21. Arkansas ti. Hendrix 14, Col. of Dierks 0. Wiley 105, Philander Smith 19. Far ITVaf Manta Rosa I. C. 18, Stanford 13. California Fresh 7, Chico Mtnte 0. Laun. (field fail) RolUnger. Northwestern Scoring: (Touchdowns!, Aschcnbrenner, Hunt, Holland laub for Gorski I, WI 11 gen, Schwall, Murakowwskl. (Points after touchdown I, Schwall (4) Yungwirth (all place kicks. Northerwestern Substitution*: Ends. Holland. Orllch. Clark. Careen. Zuravleff. Tackle*. Eggers, Sewell Zelentck. Korzelfus. Guards, Justak, Thomas, Kirsch, Nemeth. Centers, Tourek. Btachkhoff. Backs, Burson, Baggott, McKenzie, Hunt, Murakoskl, Keefe, Connote, Laser, Yungwirth, Parse- gtan. Iowa State Substitious: End*, Parti, Wiltsle, Jensen. Tackles. Breda, Selbold, Schneider, Bosnyak. Guards, Anderson, Ethlngton Centers: Hokier, C. Dennis. Racks, Willer, Dennis, Kraus, De heck er, Howard. Knack. Chauncey. Klootwyk. National to Losing Wolverines Hand Indiana PROMPT SERVICE We /Clean All Types of Hats, Ladies or Gents Samuelson ...................It........... Lorenz .............................IS- Partington (OC) ..c .......... Schwartzkopf rg.......... Slicer ............................rt....... Widseth .. Olsonoaki Tonnemaker ,.. Dellago Carroll (Continued from Page 1-B.) ing with the resignation of Manager Frank Frisch. Pittsb’rgh ab h o a! Cincinnati ab h Second Loss . TTBRX ’ I liUS TUB / LZVV intr/ t TI linUIHl ANN ARBOR, Mich. (UP). The (Centers) Thomson, Evans. (Quarterbacks) stmer ........ n.................... Pesek .....................re...................... Gagne Vacrntl ....................qb.......................... Ktspert Hutton .................A..lh.............................. Cate* Fischer..................T..rh........................ Avery Novak ^...............th.................. Beleradorf Nebraska .................................. O O 6 0—6 Minnesota ............................... 2 13 6 12—3 Nebraska scoring: (Touchdown) Moomey, Minnesota scoring: (Touchdowns) Avery. Beiersdorf, Sandberg, H. Elliott. Heffelfinger: (try for point) Gagne (placement). Safety: Nebraska. Longs blocked punt falling out of bounds in end zone. Substitutions: Nebraska (Ends) Bunker, Nyden; (Tackles) DlBtase, Hall, Becker. Tegt: (Guards) Devlney, Wilkins, Lipps. University of Michigan.put in a gam. £SSr&*S25fiSi*2t >trong bid for the 1946 western conference championship Saturday by crushing Indiana’s titleholders, 21-0, before a record apening day crowd of 74,600 at Michigan stadium. Indiana displayed a brilliant tics, but lacked scoring punch and tumbled in the wrong places as the Wolverines uncorked two touchdown passes and returned a goal line punt-for their third tally. 5 2i it Corbitt s 3 16 liZientara3b 5 I 5 OI Prey rf 2 2 I ii Mueller c 2 0 4 0! Limon lf 5 2 3 0! Adams 2b 4 13 0! Sh ok es lb 4 11 31 Clay cf 5 2 3 0| Blackwell p 3 0 0 OI Ltbke Strincevich p I 0 0 OI Jumbert p ' Lamanno Shoun p Lakeman Gustine 2b Fletcher lh Russell cf Salkeld c Camail e Elliott rf Riner lf Cox ss Handley 3b Walsh p Hawks Stun Purdue 16-0, Si? In Loop Upset 0 0 2 . mnn, / m\ I Additional Sports Page (MHP 6 S 0 3 0 2 1 S I 6 2 3 13 0 3 13 3 3 19 0 4 2 3 1 0 0 0 2 ! 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 10 0 0 10 0 0 IOWA CITY, la. (JP). Dr. Eddie Anderson, three years away in service, hasn’t lost his touch at producing surprises—his Iowa Hawks came thru with a 16 to 0 upset Saturday over favored Purdue in the Big Nine football opener for both teams. A PARTISAN crowd of 36,000 3 i e 27 is!Dad’s Day fans watched Ander- Totals 39 12 27 61 Totals ------------------ . BM Bl Llbke batted for Blackwell in third; La- son’s first postwar production roll manno batted for Gumbert in fourth; Lake man batted for Shoun In ninth Pittsburgh ............................... 203 201 020—10 Cincinnati ......................... OOO 300 OOO— 3 low. Minnesota: (End) Halenkamp, H. Hem. Baston, Baumgartner, M. Bein. Soltau, Carley, Mealey; (Tackles) Grevtrh. McGovern, Moehnke, McCleary: (Guards) Hoker Edwards, Nomelltni, Danielson. Pulver, Honn; (Centers) Boson, SUanoff; (Quarterbacks) Sandberg, Thiele, McAllister: (Halfbacks) Faunce, Bye, H. Elliott, McNeil, Hausken, Gidding, Heffelflnger, Wheeler; (Fullbacks) Lutx, B. Elliott, H. Elliott, Malosky. Officials: Referee Ted O’Sullivan. Missouri: Umpire H. G. Hedges. Dartmouth: Linesman Bob Miller, Missouri; Field Judge Lloyd Larson, Wisconsin. >pw Way Hat Works 138 So. 13th THE VICTORY AVENGED two straight opening-day defeats at the hands of Indiana in 1944 and 1945, and established Michigan as a strong favorite to replace the Hoosiers as Big Nine champions. Indiana displayed a mrilliant passing game, chalking up eight first downs thru the air to none for Michigan as the Hoosier receivers came up from nowhere to complete 12 of 30 forwards. Indiana also gained 172 yards by passing to 52 for Michigan. Ford in the end zone for a fourth period tally. Hertnie Rohrig’s 80 yard punt topped the Huskers’ 25-9 victory in 1939 and Butch Luther and Rohrig dazzled in N.U.’s 200 triumph in 1940. • • • K-State came thru with a 12-6 Runs: Gustine 3, Fletcher 2, Russell. Salkeld, Elliott, Riner, Handley, Mueller, Lukon, Adams. Error: Corbitt 3, Adams. Runs batted In: Gustine 3, Cox 3, Russell, Salkeld, Riner, Chokes 2, Clay. Two base hit: Riner, Adams. Handley. Elliott. Three base hit: Cox. Home run: Gustine 2. Double play: Fletcher to Cox, Frey to Shokes. Zientara to Adam# to Shokes. Left on base: Pittsburgh 7, Cincinnati 7. Base on balls: Off Walsh 5. Blackwell 3, Gumbert I, Shoun I. Struck out: By Walsh Strincevich 4, Blackwell 3, Cuthbert I. Shoun 2. Hits: Off Walsh 4 In 4 1/3 innings, Strincevich 2 In 4 2/3; Blackwell 5 in 3, Gumbert 2 in I, Shoun 5 ta 5. Hit by pitcher: By Walsh (Lukon). Wild pitch: Blackwell. Passed ball: Salkeld. Winning pitcher: Strincevich Losing Pitcher: Blackwell. Umpires: eonian and Henllue. Time 2:08. Attendance 1,939. back Purdue, a team with a 13 point pre-game advantage, ac cording to some forecasters. The Hawks hinted that a surprise was in the making when they drove deep into Purdue territory in the first period and Bob Sullivan, former Iowa Seahawk, placekicked from the 14-yard line for a 3 to 0 lead. ais . . . calls for CLEAN togs: • SUITS • HATS • TOP COATS • SWEATERS • SKIRTS 0 ELP IS—HELP YOU Cali 2-67.11 P EERLESS CLEANERS 322 So. ll Geo. II. Lemon THRILLS # SPILLS * EXCITEMENT victory in the mud in 1941 when Mike Zeleznak romped to a pair of touchdowns. The 1942 tussle went to Ward Haylett’s gang, 19 to 0, but Nebraska broke the spell in 1943 with a 13-7 decision. The Cornhuskers came thru with a surprising 35 to 0 runaway in 1944 and repeated last year at Manhattan with a 24-0 score. Husker-Gopher Facts Minn. First downs total .......................... 15 By rushing ........................................ 5 By passing .................*..................... 6 By penalties ................................. * Rushing (number of rushes) .. 53 Yards gained rasing ....................202 Yards lost rushing ........................... IO Net gain rushing ......................192 Forward pawing (number attempted) ...............15 Number completed ........................... 12 Number passes intercepted .... 0 Net yards gained ... .................129 Total plays (rushes and passes) 68 Total net yards gained ............321 Punts number .1............................... 3 Average yards ................ 27 Had blocked ...................................... 0 Kickoffs (number) ........................ 6 Average yards .............. 51 Kickoff returns. punt returns ............................ 7 Punt return yards .......................... 96 Kickoff return number................. 3 Kickoff return yards ................... 82 Fumbles (number) ........................ 2 Ball lost fumbles ............................. 2 Interceptions return number .. 0 Yards returned ............................ 0 Penalties number ............................. « Yards penalized ..................... 45 Final score ............................... 33 Touchdowns ........................................ Conversions ....................... 3 Field goals ........................................... 0 Field goals attempted .......... 0 FOOTBALL Fridays October 4th, 8 P. M. at Magee Memorial Stadium NORTHEAST VS. FALLS CITY Tickets 60c Tax Included On Sale Thur. & Fri. at . . . Bethany Barber Shop ............................................... 1523 Coiner Blvd. Harry Parker’s ..........................................................6209 Havelock Ave. Lawlor Sporting Goods Co ...................................1118 O Street Mayo Drug Co.................................................. 2700 North 48th Peerless Cleaners .................................................322 South lith HUNTERS YOU CAN TAKE YOUR BED ALONG AND KEEP YOUR CAR CLEAR OF LUGGAGE WITH A BANTAM ENCLOSED TRAILER. IMMEDIATE DELIVERY! to distinction . . . Lounge Abouts They’re an invitation to relaxation — and an expression of your good taste. Unlined brown calfskin, soft uppers, neolite soles, leather heels. UTILITY TRAILER SALES 1634 “O” St. 5-6755 “Where your dollar makes sense Wells & Frost Co 128-132 No. 10th St. Motorcycle Races TWO * * STAR ♦ ♦ ♦ : ♦ ♦ ♦ • Seven Event* • Obstacle Race • Comedy Intermission I Sunday Sept. 29 TIME TRIALS 1:00 RACES 2:00 Vi Mile North of "0" On 66th LINCOLN, NEBRASKA ♦ ♦ I ♦♦ A. M. A. Sanction 9960 50c (tax included) Sponsored by LIGHTNING MOTORCYCLE CLUB I I X Football Ticket Information KANSAS STATE-NE FOOTBALL GAME • Saturday, October 5 1,000 Season Tickets Available. Three Thousand Individual Game Tickets Remain. THERE WILL BE NO GENERAL ADMISSION SECTIONS THERE WILL BE A KNOTHOLE SECTION FOR BOYS AND GIRLS Reserved Seat Tickets. $2.75 (Inc. Tax) No orders accepted without money order, or cash. Make checks payable to A. J. Lewandowski. Ticket:* can be obtained at BEATON DRUG CO. 15th & Farnam, Omaha LATSCH BROS. Lincoln COLISEUM TICKET OFFICE University of Nebraska

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