The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on February 24, 1897 · Page 1
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 1

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Algona, Iowa
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Wednesday, February 24, 1897
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Page 1
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f ' '^ c * ^ "r *" V ' ' " , £' * f - 5 JTABLtSHED 1865, IOWA, WMDND8BAT, ffEBRTJABY 'J4, 1897. ill Here' LIVELY DAY IN THE HOUSE Soions Were Excited Saturday Over ft Resolution to Investigate the State Institutions* IK THB- Movement oft Foot for a Marshal to vestigate Fires hi the The Week's Resume* ir stock is completer than ever, and prices fand qualities equal to any. M. Z: Grove & Son. 102 E. State St. [TBL/BPHONB is. CEO. L. CALBRAITH & CO. ' CARRY A FULL LINE OF ets, Boots and Shoes, Dry Goods, /all Paper, Window Shades, Hats, Caps, Gloves, Mittens, Under- lear, Gents-Furnishings, and in fact everything to be had in a first- ass'store. Our prices are the lowest. WE WILL NOT BE TDERSOLD. G. L. Galbraith & Co. DBS MdiNES, Feb. 23.—The general assembly refused to take a holiday yesterday, both branches being hard, at work as usual, regardless of Washington's birthday. Saturday was rather an exciting day in the house. The Carney resolutions providing for a general investigation of the state institutions came up for consideration. A lively debate followed. Mr. Brant of Linn made , extended remarks, saying that inasmuch as the house had voted to investigate to a limited degree it ought to go on and make a complete investigation of everything. Mr. Crow was opposed to undertaking so big a job. A motion was made to indefinitely postpone the resolution, which motion was lost on a roll call. After further debate and numerous amendments, a motion to lay the resolution on the table was carried without a roll call. During the debate Smith of Greene said he did no't believe corruption existed in the state institutions, though prices of supplies might in some instances be too high. He favored cutting off the per diem' of the committee. The motion to indefinitely postpone was made by Mr. Wood of Madison and carried. The action of the house means that there will be no more investigations and it is believed those now in progress will amount to but little. It will be seen that very little will come out of all the newspaper noise. In the house Mr. Temple secured the adoption of an amendment to the present law in regard to the protection of concerned and are yet afraid that Something will transpire in the matter of taxation to their detriment. The farmers are not unmindful Of their in^ terests and are making their wants and wishes known by numerous letters and petitions. 1 predict that the revenue law will remain practically as it has been for 40 years, 4- -K4" .- ., • The general assembly has been in session five weeks and there has nqt been a day's adjournment, and apparently little time wasted. The committees are hard at work and it is believed that the questions involving most debate have been passed upon; Good progress will be made henceforth, but the session will last six weeks yet The adjournment will consequently be about the 6th or 7th of April. 4-4-4-' " ' Lieutenant-Governor Parrott has returned from Galveston, where ho attended the mooting of the National Editorial association. Senator Funk presided all last week with' perfect satisfaction to the senators. 4-4-4- The senate has voted to cut printers' fees as applied to original notices, sheriff sales and board proceedings 25 per cent. The newspaper men do not endorse this move and claim they, have not boon getting any too much in the past. 4-4-4- Governor Drake, assisted by his daughter Mrs. Sturdivant, and her husband, also by, Miss Mary Carpenter and two other nieces gave a reception at the Savery Friday evening to the members of the general assembly and state officers. Nearly all those invited •were present, many of the members and senators being accompanied by their wives. All their guests had a curiosity to see the governor's daughter's husband on account of the elopement so recently mentioned in the press. All were pleased with the young man VOL. XXXl-NO.'4ft The Latest Things Out are always found at our store. We make a specialty of white ware for decorating. Langdon & Hudson. TBI/BFHONB NO. IS. C. J. DUTTON, He has a good face and if he is not a nice young man his appearance is deceiving. He is possessed Fine Oak Birch Chamber Suits It remarkably low prices. We are also mak- I ing special prices on odd pieces of upholstered goods, Complete stock of |iidertaMng Goods. RADEAT HOBART With THOEN & JONES. UP.TO»PATE MERCHANTS I You can buy more for one dollar with us than any other place. 1 HBYPQUXBTERS FOE COAL. ^WHITHAM • will esMWtofo tide Hide and Fur Business v«a. Will also buy rvrtrtier and f „_ Jso prepared to wy sales on short s iS »t?.4l.W?J^|L^H?.^ 2S.3S5 NOT. .. . tfee COW* 9»*raterviJ»ESJfVS railway employes. The amendment provides that no contract or agreement or the i-eceipt of any relief or insurance shall be a bar to recovery from the railway company for personal injury to its employes. Some railway companies have relief associations organized among their own employes,, therefore the object of this amendment is apparent. It is to prevent the railroad companies from setting up the relief granted by the association as- a defense against a further relief. 4-4-4- Ah effort was made in the house to repeal the law permitting aid to be voted to railroads by taxation but the same was defeated and the law remains as it is at the present time. 4-4-4- The senate has amended the code in regard to dairy interests, requiring creameries and cheese factories to furnish statistics to the dairy commissioner, and the salary of the commissioner's clerk was restored to $75 a month, 4-4-4- Mr. Hinman has introduced into the house resolutions reciting that the prices of crops are low and urging the railway commissioners to use their best endeavors to secure -a out rate in freight rates to eastern and southern markets for the next 40 days. 4-4-4- A movement is on foot creating the office of fire marshal for the entire state, the salary of such officer to be paid by the insurance companies. It is to be the marshal's business to investigate fires that have any auspicious circumstances about them and make a record for future reference, Insurance men say that incendiarism is entirely too common, A good many members, however, are afraid that a year or two after the office should be created that the salary will be changed from the insurance companies to the state and thus a new office be created. The office of fire marshal will undoubtedly have to wait. *$* -H H^ A proposition is pending before the committee on ways and means to tax gross premium receipts of our home life insurance companies. Heretofore these companies have been exempt, while companies from other states have been taxed. Naturally enough our of some means and has established a small bank at Moravia, Appanoose county. Ap . Y OUNG. AND MJNOH COUNTER, Corner opposite Koasutb County bank, for w * M Srst-clasiB meals or lunches. Meals and Ivscfeee served at all bows. QYSTEBB ""tyMR, ^-*S3H*--*tf Lies , H. 9HELLY & PETTIBQNE, Head' Stones, *" f Monuments home companies object to the taxation and claim that it will cripple their business, They say that if the taxa* tion on outside companies is increased also in this state, then when our cow panies do business, in other states under a reciprocity arrangement they will he taxed more there. A vigorous contest is being wage.il on the matter- The great fight of the session will he over the revenue bill, The committees hftve practically ^Fee4 OB a tax valua* tion o! 83* per cent, of fche real value property. Thie revenue bill hap Pi9ted wide attention. and. yearly every Merest has be&n, hjri endeavor* e\jt .' Homage Paid to "Shy Stones." Because they come from meteors, bodies that fall in this way are called meteorites, and for very many years past all the meteorites which have been seen to fall, or could be found, have been carefully kept, so that they may be studied. We know, too, that they have fallen in earlier times as well, because the histories of nearly all ancient peoples contain accounts of such occurrences, and of the homage paid to the "sky stones" by those who thought them gifts from the goda, or miraculous objects. It is probable that the so called goddess Diana who was worshiped by the people of Bphesus was a meteoric stone. . . A mass of iron which proved to be a meteorite was found in Texas a few years ago at the crossing of a number of trails leading in different directions. It was learned that it had been set up by the Indians as a fetich, or object of worship, and whoever passed by was expected to leave upon it beads, arrow heads, tobacco or other articles as offerings, since it was regarded as having come from the Great Spirit. Another, which fell in India some years ago, was kept decked with flowers, was daily anointed and frequently worshiped wiih great ceremony. There is preserved to this day in the parish church of Ensisheim, Alsace, Germany, a stone weighing over 300 pounds which fell in the town Nov. 16, 1492. The feing, being near at the time, had the stone carried to the castle, and after breaking off two pieces, one for himself and the other for the Duke Sigismund, ordered the remainder to be kept in the church as a miraculous object, and it still hangs there, suspended by a chain from the vault of the choir.—Oliver 0, Farrington in St. Nicholas, Horses and Flutes. "They say," wrote Ben Jonson, "princes learn no art truly but the art of horsemanship, The reason is the brave beast is no flatterer, He will throw ft prince as soon as his groom." The Greek theory of education, as we find it to Plato, was of a twof old kind-- "oneol gymnastics relating to the body, the other of music for the sake of * S 00 * state o* the eoni." Briefly, as Mr, Pater expresses it, "a gymnastic fused to music,'' This system of education pe Greefes applied »o lees to the training of horses than o* men, In the earliest extant treatise oa riding, Xenophon pointe4 out that horsemanship, Ufce Fancy Patent Flour, per sack, Bed Rose Flour, per sack, Family Flour, per sack, .... One hundred pounds granulated sugar G. J. DUTTON, IRVINGTON, IOWA. $1.10 1.05 .95 5.00 Special Days AT PROFESSIONAL. -N^W^^^^^-w^f'^i-^-'^WN^-Xx'S CLARKE & COHENOUR, ATTORNEYS AT 'LAW; Office over First National bank, Algona, la. E. H. CLARKE, ATTORNEY, AT LAW. Collection agent. Boston block. DANSON & BUTLER, LAW. LOANS. LAND. Collections a specialty. Office In Gardner Cowles' new building. SULLIVAN & McMAHON, ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Office In Hoxle-Ferguson block. Cong'l Ladies, Thursday, FEB...2$ Episcopal Church, Monday, MARCH i Presbyterian Church, Monday, MARCH 8 Jas. Taylor. E. V. SWETTING, ATTONEY AT LAW, Algona, Iowa. J, 0. RAYMOND, ERNEST O. BAYMOND RAYMOND & RAYMOND, ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Algona, Iowa. FREDERICK M, CURTJ9S, ATT OR NE Y AT LAW, Office over Kossuth County State Bank, Algona, Iowa. M, P. G, F, PBBK po lancing, was dependent fundamentally „„ the play impulse, that (or , to he done well it must be done w pleasure? "what the horse doesundey compulsion, is done without wOenfeHfr ing, and. there is no tewrtf to tt my more tb. an if one ehoui4 whip and ep** a dancer." The how wisst become M artist, too, in hla manner, and w* m iteha Wth, rythmteai Haggard & Peek, [Successors to Jones & Smith,! Abstracts, Real Collections, ALGQNA, IOWA, F. L. TRIBON, M, Pi, Homeopathic. PHYSICIAN AND SURQBQN, Office and residence in the Boston Block. (In the new block,) ,H. C. McCOY, M. P., PHYSICIAN AND SURQSQN, Office at residence, McGregor utowet. PHYSICIAN AND 6URCRON, lowm relates how tfce Sybaritej thei* ho?&es *Q dance at theiy fee mujio qf ftp flute, 8io» feeiy en,ew;e& put te b\}mor«fts QET WATER QR NO PAY, em *Q Steam Cable Well Drilling Outfit of dee; M, a, PHYSICIAN AND 8UWSQN, Office and residence over Taylor's, "N v-i E, S, G^ASIBR, D. P, $,, o«ce QYW the, state Bask, toys* iA I*ocal anaesthetic lot ^ 4 " DR, PRESTON, Eye, Ear, Nose and!

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