The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on August 12, 1896 · Page 4
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 4

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Algona, Iowa
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Wednesday, August 12, 1896
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'3¥ftf '• 1 " .'V • " . i,\ T O'- ,-' ' • L -\<"<4 * r Pfflfl 1fflSilf}tt fraua JLJtLJa UJrJrJkuJa .UiutS IOWA, WBPNSaDAY. AtKTOOT 12. MM. IN IOWA" imnti , OfeftAtboSA. Attf. 8.— A fatal wreck , 6ec!f*1Sct tttt Ilh6 Kffck Island f ailf dad ftt -t*e!gntbflj tett mfles west bf here. Si* Mfefi wefe killed, 200 sheep and hogs . %iatigniei»ed ftfad five cars completely the tfack t^as tore tip d?6tattce bf 200 feet. There were ttieii who boarded the train at Des Mottles, T%Vo of them are colored afid these two escaped uninjured* They withhold their names and s&y they positively do not know the dead iUBn. Five of thti inch were killed ib- stantly, the sixth surviving in ah unconscious state for about three hours. tThe dead ttien were Thomas teytoti, fidWard Garey, Robert- Garey, William Kremer, William Shea and an nn- JtttoWn man, They were stealing a ride to Chicago. The train was made up of four cars of live stock, nine of dressed beef and one of furniture. Nine cars Were ditched, the engine, five cars an'd the caboose remaining on the track. The train was running at the rate of fifty miles an hour and the shock was terrific. The wheel that caused the trouble was thrown over SOO feet from where it came off. Though the axle had been in bad shape for a long time, it had escaped the inspector's notice, as it had worn bmooth and did not show up. FATAL FRATERNAL JEALOUSY. Awful Tragedy at Monroe Between Brollicrs. MONKOB,. August !i;—Virgil Woody, a young man living five miles east of town, waylaid his brother Charley in the barn, and when the latter arrived 'home between 11 and ia o'clock at night he shot him, the ball taking effect in his hand. Charley then ran for the corn field, his: brother giving chase and firing three, more shots at him, none taking effect. lie then phiced the revolver to his head and Bent a shot through his brain. He flied a few hours later without regaining, consciousness. There was ill- feeling between the brothers over a girl in Monroe. The girl had given Virgil the cold shoulder, and had been out riding with the successful brother, which led to the above result. A ROCK ISLAND WRECK, An Extrji Freight AVont Into the Dlti-h Between Grliincll and SIttlcoui. GHINNEI.I,, Aug, 8. — An extra freight train, cast boimd, broke in two in the ' dip between Grinuell and Malcom, on the Rock Island, and twelve cars were piled up in the ditch. The accident Was caused by. the detached rear section running- into the head end with a force that sent the cars tumbling around over the right of way in the , v most promiscuous fashion. The only -.casuality was that which happened to Brakeman Willy, who emerged from the mix-up with a sprained ankle -and a rufllcd temper. The wreck blocked the main line during the night. HE BROKE CAIN'S HEAD. A Cedar Itaplds Old SoU'linr Starts Out Looking 'for Trouble., CKDAH RAPIDS, August 8.— While drunk, an old soldier named Goldsmith ttart'ed out to make trouble. He met John Cain, a druggist at Palo, and Dffered to shake hands. They had had difficulty lately and Cain refused Aim his hand, whereupon lie- struck Dain over the head with a club, fracturing his skull and inflicting a langerous wound. Goldsmith . as- laulted another man, who resisted,. threw Goldsmith down and broke two >f his ribs, Fatal Kunau-ay. IOWA CITY, August '.).— A horse pelonging, to Mercer Bros. ran away, throwing the occupants. Willie Moreer ind George, Dougherty, lads of K), from the carriage. Mercer escaped with a broken leg, but Dougherty received injxiries from which he died. Rcotl Taken to tho Asylum. WATKHI.OO, August (i.— Judge Toler- fon filed the order of the court suspending the petition of habeas corpus (p the Scott case and remanding the prisoner to the insane asylum. Scott, accompanied by Sheriff Law and Mrs. &cott. was taken to .Independence, WSS.OOO For » AVuiruui'B JIoijlBS. CKDAK RAPIDS, August y.—Abralmm ' Bfriinmer, tbo weojtjy Jewish banker QtWaverly," has donated 833,000 to the , Jfpme for Aged Women in this city, ' provided a t-Jike sum is donated by tttfrttrl tj. WftfeMer% tftrft1e»t Fftrrfl tfl J)KS MoiSfftS, Ahgnst 9.—JSifam C. Wheeler, of Sac .cdtinty, has just doled the deal fof the fettle of his big farm, ahd was ih Des Moittes ott blisi- ness connected with it. The sale of this far* 5s a notable ohe. ]\tr. Wheeler says it was the largest general purpose farm in the \vorld. ;tt Included 6,800 acres, of.aboiit nine square miles) and Mr. Wheeler says that white there are ranches itt the west, br exclusive wheat farms in the Dakotasj that contain larger areas, there is no farm operated for general purposes that contains so many acrei? as his big establishment. Mr. Wheeler bought tlie land twenty-five years ago for 93ifiO an acre, lie sells it to W. P. Adams, of Chicago, for 840 an acre* with the reservation that hd shall not give possession till March, 1808. In the twenty-five years he has owned it, he has made it pay a good interest every year on the original investment, so that the difference between the original cost of $20,300 and the selling price of $332,000 is all profit. In the twenty-five years that he managed it, there was never a year of crop failure. In 1804 the nearest to a failure was experienced, and in that year oats yielded about forty and corn fifteen bushels to the acre. Mr. Wheeler has been a successful farmer on a large scale. He has not decided Avhat he will do after he gives possession of the place. He still has about 200 acres of land in Sac county and about 1,00(1 acres in various parts of Iowa. BOY FATALY SHOT. JI oil Is On .is In CurcloHs with a Ili/Ie unc} IH in a Critical Condition. BHISTOW, Aug. :10.—Hollis Cass, 1'.)year-old son of. JI. II. Cass, >two and'a half miles east of town, jjwas cleaning his 22-ealibre magazine rifle, and while leaning over the end of the barrel worked the lever that throws the shell into the barrel, and in s'oine manner pulled it off. Tho ball struck him in the left side, passed through him and camc^out at the back. It is doubt- full if he can recover. ShootlnfC Scrnpo at Uubn<|iie. Di:in;g.UK, Aug. 10.—In an altercation at the race track, Harry Sa.yre shot a jockey named Hugh Penny. The latter is seriously wounded but it is thought he will recover. Sayre is from Middleport. Ohio, with several horses. . ' ALL OVER TOE WOtlJJ LION A CHILIS. A Cirbnft Advertisement i»rdt?t Ftttni to A Cmt/r.icoTHB. Atig. 7.— A panic oi no small proportions was created at the /air grounds Where a section of the itageiibeck animal show was performing. Among tho animals of the show is a large lion, which has been chained near the entrance of the tent 'as an advertisement. It is n young beast find the proprietor of the exhibit prided himself on its docility and peaceablertess* Eddie, Iturd, the 18' months-old son of the proprietor was, playing' near tho nnimal and came within its reach. The mother called the child away but too late, The fe^ roeious animal seized the infant by the head and shook it as a terrlOr would a rat. The mother, reckless of danger, rushed to the rescue of her babe, and might have been torn to pieces but for the quick presence of mind of the father,' scaring the "brute with a whip. The lion let the child go but it was a corpse, its hood being crushed out of semblance to anything human. The affair caused a panic in the crowded grounds and soon emptied them. HUNGARIAN HURRlfcANES. I)i!»tro.v Whole Villages and Kill Many People* Hi:i>A FKST, August 7.— Terrible hurricanes, accompanied by destructive hail storms, iiro reported from various parts of Hungary. Many persons are known to have perished in the floods from the. mountains, and it is feared that l?iter reports will show much greater loss of life. The damage to property all through the oountry districts was very heavy. In the tow'ns of (3ra/,, Terentschinteplitz and .Iveczkeinet there has been n, tremendous amount of damage done to property by the wind and floods. In the latter town, which numbers about fiOjOOO inhabitants and is about fifty miles southeast of Buda Test, it is reported that almost every house has been damaged and the loss is estimated ttt millions of florins. NEW PAUING RECORD. Ajs'AWQSA i? August 0,-rOiibar.n. Bros,, Uv'erymep and stock dealers, have Jajled for $3 i.Ofio, An attachment has been, issued. agajnst thorn a-nd tljeir Osborn, fa favor of J<. wao.ooo. Angufat ',),—• The p)ant l*ipo aqd Tile Coinpany P# 4am»g»4 te the extent of about , the origin pf which is Two Atlantic Uiiyg Drowned. ATLANTIC, August 9.— Willie Auxier and .Toe ICuright, aged about ten years, were drowned while bn thing in Troublesome creek. En right tried to save the life pi' his comrade, BREVITIES. The democrats of ' the Third cou- gress'iomtl district nominated George Staehle of Manchester for congress. He will contest with Col. Henderson. Fire which started in Mclntyre Hros. & Wilson's big dry goods store at 'Oskaloosa recently, caused ti very heavy loss. The flames were quenched, but not until a loss of §40,000 to $50,000 had been entailed. Insured for 85 1,000. Thomas O'Dea, a well-known attorney of Sioux City, hits recently been arrested on a charge of embezzlement, preferred by R. M. Jones. The latter was recently arrested on a charge of larceny, and secured 0' Dea as his lawyer. He says O'Dea appropriated money, sent by his friends in his care to be used in securing his release from jail, O'Dea is out ou bond, Wallace's Farmer, Henry Wallaces weekly agricultural paper published at Des Moines, announces that it will next week begin a thorough discussion of the silver question from the standpoint of Die farmer. No western man is more thoroughly competent to handle this question than Henry Wallace, and as he will discuss it in a fair and non-partisan manner, his articles will be widely read by men of till parties and shades of opinion. He announces that he will send Wallace's Farmer tc Jan. 3, 18.17, for 40 cents', Washington dispatch: A serious cutting utt'ray took place near Noble, a village twelve miles south of Washington. Joseph Schautx, an old German, and his son, Jacob, got into n quarrel during the day, and it ended in a serious fight in which the father ,gave the son five gashes in the week, one cut almost severipg- the windpipe. The you ug man is a victim of alcoholism, and he lr ( is spent u year- : in, the insane asylum at Mount Pleasant. IJe is peaceable when he is sober, b.u"'fc->vhen drunk he is a terror. The old man acted in self defense, i\a he had the knife out for tho purpose of opening the door of a milk house 'in wjiieh Jake ]md locked himself. Just as he opened the door Jacob rushed at his father with a hummer like a tiger. The old man slashed right and loft afld th<s boy got in the way of 'tho knife. Tho doctors ijou.bt tho fcon'& recovery. John F. liuwy WHS renominatcd for eongrewj, by tho rc-puMU'MUS, of the «Sisth dibU-i#t ut the cxwYputicm ut Jtobert .1. Steps Off a COMJ.MJIUS, Aug. 7, again demonstrated greatest pacer ever Mile In ;!:OZ R-4. —Robert .1. bus tliat Jio is the harnessed to a WAS AWHJL. Tfnopit ftefefttfcdl ttic Jffttefefeie in a filoodjf- ftncftSrefiftent. Aug. 8.—Details are received here of a decis : ve victory won by 700 British troops, composing Col. t'lummef's column, over a native force estimated at from S.OOO to 7,000. The latter fought most desperately, bravely charging up Within a few yards of the Dritish rapid firing guns. About oOO Matebele warriors were slniu during the engagement, which lasted several hours, and the loss of the British included Major Kershaw, Lieutenant Harvey and four sargeants.. About thirty soldiers were killed and six officers and about fifty men are Wounded, according to unofficial figures. bEAD ENGINEER RESPONSIBLE. ilnri F«rr Obeyed the Atlantic, Wreck • Would Not Have Occurred. Ai-i.AKtif; CITY, N. J,. Augusts.—-The coroner's jury investigating the wrecking of an excursion train near here recently, 'in which many lives were lost, returned a verdict finding thai the collision was caused \>y the failure of Engineer Edward Farr to have hi« train under control on approaching the signal and crossing under the rules, National Doniocriitn. IxmAXAi-oi.rs,. August !). The "sound money" democrats decided tc call a convention to be held at Indianapolis on the !.'d of September and thai the party should be known as the national democratic party. An address is being prepured. TrliildiUl Trouble. jjisnox, Aug. fi.—It is again stated that Ureat Ih-itian has recognized the sovereignity of Brazil over the island of Trinidad. Similar statements were made in February last, and have been repeated at intervals. TERSE NEWS. SPAIN AND CU6AN CRISIS. The id tttot sulky. The free-for-all pace proved to be the greatest race of the year, the fastest four consecutive heats and the fastest fourth heat ever trotted. or paced on any track being made. In the first heat, paced in :i:CU%, Kobert J. again lowered his record half a second,, and broke the track- record. The second and third heats in ":U4J'j were considered phenomenal, but the crowd was not prepared for the great surprise when the fastest fourth heat ever paced or trotted was made, the time being (.'.-OS-y-. TOWN DESTROYED. Twenty lAve.K arc Lost and (S>t,OOO,OOO Uiiitiiigu Done by Nicaragua Kloodt;. ST. Loins, Aug. 8.—A special from Jil IJamii, Nicaragua, says that the heavy rains caused the rivers Kama and Siqua. in that neighborhood, to rise rapidly. The panic-stricken inhabitants took refuge on high ground and on boai-d the steamers in the river J?ama. Only fifteen buildings were left stundipg in El Ramo. The plantations near the town arc all destroyed and the loss is estimated at more than i from $1,000,000, Many of the refugees have .found shelter in Uluefields. Twenty lives were lost. PCS, M.Gine's .Dispatch say*,: ' ' of tho 'ufry hay'o beuoine BALD VS. COOPER. Nt<-,v YVorld'H. Kecoril for, Put'Cii Siilglu SI He, by lliild. .HIWAI,O, August- 8,— Eddie Buld and Tom Cooper fought it out in tho mile open at the Buffalo Athletic Club track, and liald not only won in 3:01 4-f), but in doing so clipped five and one-fifth seconds off the 1 world's record for the single mile paced, in competition. ..'olin J{. Gentry i» VPondur, Coi.iUHU'S, O,, August '.).— John R. Gentry went a mile at the Columbus Driving Park in an effort to break the world's stallion pacing record, lie went in 3:08 J»', lowering the record a quarter of a second. Oceiin Kec-orit llrpken, NK\V YOIIK, August 'J,--The American line steamer St. Louis, has made a new record from Southampton, beating the time of her sister ship, the St. T'aiil, by'moro than two hours, , Mich,,' August 7,— 'Ji'liM republican, state, convention nominated Detroit's famous mayor, 11 awn S. Pingrt;e, for governor, on the fourth ballot. Mvt> UirU Aug. 10.- In the Dupout live bird tournament Uevt Clarage, <jf Baltimore, won the Uilbert, oi' Iowa, fell down. An *>omo parts of the old country, Mirinons are btill preached of more than un hour In length. Froni so to 3."> mijHUei? ih the general rule. ^Wjjoy tKe'UU'»s}»gb of this day, if ,Uod wnt tUvtn. unfl the evils bnar pa?, 4 »iwoow,vj for vhi,s (Jay is wnly, ' \\'p ure dead to .vwhierdav >vt» are not yet bora tp Ui«s Hior- Taylor. ' ' Wisconsin republicans nominated Major Edward Scoflelcl for governor. Richard P. Bland was nominated by the democrats of his old district by acclamation. Xebraska populists re-nominated Governor Holeomb by acclamation, and named .lohn C. Harris for lieutenant governor., .Resolutions were finally passed giving the V-ontral committee authority to name ll " I'ltetoral ticket in conjunction with tho democrats. A GiUhrie, Okla.. dispatch says: Bill Doolin. the outlaw, who escaped from the United States jail in Guthrie four weeks ago, was .surrounded by deputy marshals at Wcwoka. A desperate fight tc>9k place. .During the fusilade of shots Doolin escaped. Deputies T. M. Gregor and Horace Reynolds were killed. . It is said thot extreme, satisfaction is felt among the Christians in Crete at the news that the governor of Candia, whose report of the recent pillaging and burning was not deemed satisfactory, has been replaced by Ha sen Pasha, who formerly established such satisfactory condition in the same district. The various European courts haye received letters from members of the royal family of Greece saying that King George will probably abdicate in favor of Crown Prince Constantioe, Duke, of Sparta, if the. powers compel Greece to desist from her aspirations to make tiie island of Crete a part of the Grecian domains. Cape Town dispatch: Cecil Rhodes displayed great courage in the field while the bullets were rainipg around him, the war correspondent returned Matabeleland reports, -The former premier says he could not see that anything- was to be'gained by his going into a hot corner, but if he did not do so he would be taunted with cowardice. Therefore he exposed himself unnecessarily to stop the mouths of his enemies. The Matabele rebels are surrendering, the correspondent declares. . , Havana dispatch: Antonio Pena Lopez and Narciso Rodriguez Lopez, respectively a lieutenant and a private in the insurgent army, were shot at the Cabanas fortress for the crime of rebellion against the Spanish government, and Nune/, Bravo, the rebel prefect of iSttntiago-de-Cuba, was executed at Santo Domingo for the same crime, Yellow fever and small- j pox are increasing- throughout the island and in certain localities have become epidemic, The authorities are adopting measures to prevent the ' Spread of the disease and to diminish the high death rate. The Chicago Daily Tribune says: "The" speculative deal in Diamond Match and New-York' Biscuit stocks has come to an end. The Moore Brothers have failed. The greatest speculative (leal ever known in Chicago has culminated in the failure of tho people who are behind tho deal," The Chicago Stock Exchange has adjourned, Tho stock of the match company had been carried from 130 to 330. and the t,tock of tlio biscuit company •was ranging high, but the load beuame too heavy for the, men who were backing them and an assignment was made. The capital .stock of the .match company was, $11,000,000 and the biscuit company w.ooo,ooo, At Neilth, Glamorganshire, Wales, an e.\plo!>Um of fire dump occurred in the JJryancoacji caU,ory, Forty miner*, were entombedj but whether they uro dead or oljve is not known. Tlw democrats of Minnesota, decided upon fusio« with the populists. They John land for t»eof>lfi Are fcefclftfllng Apalnst Wat Tfi*eB. MADRID, August 8.—Trouble of a serious nature is being fomented in Spain, particularly in the province of Valencia, by the agents of the Cuban insurgents. The minister of the interior, replying to a question in the chamber of deputies, admitted that ft, number of riots had occurred in Valencia, and said they were caused by the friends of the Cuban insurgents, Who hoped thereby to prevent the departure oi further reinforcements of troops for Cuba. Hitherto popular demonstrations have been attributed entirely to protests against the imposition of new taxes made necessary by the campaign against the insurgents in Cuba. But While the government was only too Willing to admit that the riots had been instigated by the agents of the Cuban revolutionists, it is generally admitted that the roots of the trouble are much deeper and it is being nourished by a natural feeling of alarm and dismay at the apparent utter inability of the government to cope with the situation in Cuba. That the large Spanish army in Cuba must be still further and heavily reinforced is looked upon as a confession of weakness and an admission of the growing strength of the Cubans. In aduition, many letters have been received by relatives' of the Spanish .soldiers in Cuba, and they tell such terrible tales of sickness, privation, incompetency, mismanagement and lack of pay that a dangerous feeling against the government has arisen. Republicans as well as Cuban sympathizers are taking advantage of the situation to push their propaganda, and the combined movements are making more headway with the masses than the government will admit, though it is already betraying symptoms of alarm and has sent stringent instructions to the prefects to promptly and effectually suppress demonstrations in their districts and to have no hesitation in calling- on the military for support. A- number of conflicts have already occurred, a number - of persons having been wounded on both sides and a large number of arrests made. Quay "Will Retire From Politlca. Pm-snuna, August 8,—Senator Quay stated to aPittsburg Dispatch reporter that his present term would be his last in the senate. He said: "It has often been said by others, but I have never said it myself until now. At the expiration of my term in the United States senate 1. will refuse any renom- ination and instead will retire from politics and spend the remainder of my lime getting acquainted with my family. As to the truth of the report that Don Cameron if, to be a candidate to succeed himself, I am not informed, and hardly believe, it, but so far as I am personally concerned I will not under any circumstances be a candidate for re-election at the expiration of my present term." Quick Transportation of Troops. AV'AsiriNGTOx, August (5.—The navy department some time ago ordered 100 men, which were of the crew of the Charleston, at Mare Island, Cal., to be sent to the navy yard at Norfolk. The department desired'to see what ths least possible time in crews could be transferred country. The men have Norfolk, making the trip train in four days and twenty-three hours, which is a record breaker. Tho route was via the Southern Pacific and Seaboard Air lines, The method of .transferring sailors heretofore lias been by the way of the isthmus of Panama, and occupies thirty-five days. CrptuiiR- lacked Mohammedans. CANEA, Crete, August f).—A body of Mohamineda.riK which broke through the cordon of Turkish troops at the third attempt advanced to attack the insurgents near aCirsni, Crete, but were met by the latter and repulsed, The .Cretans captured the arms and ammunition of the Mohammedans. The Turkish troops watched the fighting. • • liald ItreukH a Kel-ord, GKAND.RAJMPS, Mich., August 0.—-In the bicycle tournament Eddie Bald lowered the third mile record held by W. W. Hamilton, of Denver, from 33 3-5 to 3!) seconds flat. He tried to break the two-thirds mile record, but only equalled the stato record of 1:11 3-5. IjXMvas paced by a triplet. was which the across the arrived at by special J. J. JHnwiok for fenecretftry qf state, and Atexander MoKjnjjon for treg,ST ,,8.84 Placed f.ouy d republican , fa strike. CHICAGO, August (i, — Fourteen hundred of the 3,noo employes of tho South Chicago Shipbuilding Company struck, which necessitated tho closing of the yardfa. The strike originated with 300 boys employed to heat rivets, whose wages were cut from 81, no to SI. 33 a day. The men rivitert,, ijpo in number, f oU0\Yed_tl«.'ir example, Me', Augu&t 7. —. Thomas \i. Heed was rouominated for congress by tho republicans of the First district. ____ Jtfary Conkliu, aged ten, an. inmate of too Orphans' ^n,di<striul Home, at TlYQli, N, Y,, Jmd beuufilul gojdejn ringlets, TUey wero removed by ' the otttcewot the JjQino; H. n( j t,l 1P " girl, fearing' they again, idliifd ^J^?^4&J4Sw w j&^ » ,,.,,. — T ™JH' JW JUiiv'. >fe»^JMmlV>vp IN to »**, strttt-t ttfl<>. w ST. PfctKfcBBtjftG, Atig*ust 6,~A dis-- patch' to the J?ov6e» Vfemya ff 0fil Vladivostock announces thatCofeatia* conceded to a syndicate of Americans the fight to construct a railroad ffofn Seoul, the capital, to Chemulpo, the main pott and harbor. The Americans have the right to work the miif erals along the line of the road, anft other concessions have been grantfed t'rahce and Russia. Seoul, it is stated" is now quiet and the British sailors who landed for the protection of tnt consulate of Great Britian have, beeft withdrawn, and the American sailor* who were sent ashore to protect th c United States consulate Will be with. drawn in a few days. SO THEY WERfe MARRIED, Onto* Cornelius Vaiulcrbilt, ,fr., rtnd Minn Wilson Are 'Wedded. NEW Yonic, Auguit 5.— Despite tht determined opposition of his familv and in defiance of the threat of buinjj disinherited, Cornelius Vanderbilt, .lr° has been married to Miss Orucc Wilson. Mr. Vanderbilt. vSr., warned the young man that if he contracted the marriage he would have to depend upon his own resources for a livelihood and he need expect no share of the Vanderbilt fortune. Thus the son, by disobeying his father's wishes, threw away his prospects of inheriting u large lump of the $100,000,000 which Mr. Vanderbilt. Sr., is estimated to bo worth. Not a member of the Vanderbilt family was even invited to thu wedding. PEACE FOR CUBA. tipnln Si.ld to Hnva Opened Negotiation* for Cessation. NKW YOHK, August 10.—The Herald's Key West special says: It .is openly declared here that Captain General YVeyler has reached an understanding with the chief insurgent leaders and negotiations will be begun with a view to the cessation of hostilities in Cubit if the terms are satisfactory to nil concerned. It is also stated that the captain general and his deputy commanders have held a conference in relation to this proposition. Much greater importance, however. is attached to the report that a trueo is likely to occur soon in the island. TWO KILLED IN A STRIKE. Strikers Burn Douse of Contractor Km- ploylug Xon-UiiionifitH. BKIIEA. Ohio,.Aug. G.—The house of Richard Todd was burned. Two of his seven children were asphyxiated. A window was opened and oil poured on an unoccupied bed and lighted. The residence of ,T. R. Woodcock was also saturated with oil. Both Dodd and Woodcock' arc contractors employing non-union men. It is believed that they are victims of the union men. Hot Winds In Kansas. WICHITA, Kansas, August 10.—The appearance of hot winds all over southwestern Kansas has dampened the hopes of farmers for a tremendous , crop of corn. The winds have -been'' very severe on the late pdYh" iind as there is some likelihood of their con-' tinning, prospects for good late corn are discouraging. The heat has been intense, registering 111 degrees at point, Two Cubans Picked Up. KKV WKST, Fla., Aug. 8.—The pilot boat,Iougett came into port, having on board two Cubans, who were picked up in the gulf in a smalldingy, .which was in • a sinking condition • when sighted. The Cubans lef.t Mantanxas with important dispatches for the Cuban junta. They state that Maceo'.s forces are in good shape but lack am- uuition. Frame for Governor of Maine. WATKHVII.T.K, Me., August 7,—At the second democratic, state convention, called because of the declination of lion, Edward P..\Vinslow to stand as candidate for governor and the divided sentiment on the silver question, Melvin p. Prank, of Portland, was nominated for governor on tho first ballot. Frank is a free_silver man. Entombed Jllucrs Rescued. KANKAKEK, JU., August 10.— In a Jlre in the Clark City mine, 300 ujezi were in the shaft when the fire broke out, but all bnt forty escaped easily. Of the forty fifteen were nearly suffocated, but all are recovered. Tin; mine will resume work in four or five days. To North J'ol«> i>y B«JU.iw, August 7. -A dlbpaUh fro-u. Tromso says a message has reached therefrom Professor Anclree, say.ing he is reedy to make a start to thu north pole in his balloon, Andreu says he will either succeed in hi* HHdortaking_o£pensl2_Jn_tho attempt. Prlnw HolienJol»p JtpBigau. nionuK, August S.-Tho statement is published that Imperial Chapt-uljor Pnnce Hohenjojie has robignod and further changes are impending in tlu« ininjstjy p| finance, . "Well, fild Jnnap, FviTsnent ev«-ry fonfrof money Jh, a vein the world on my doctor," <'Po^he}v»o,w jt?" "i JB making- g-rften. apple sauco, pit odd ' * CW1 iB '° WW» « »<W •' « ™w r™ •£***** i'V4 ty 4lf-*t* t«s w»ace 'just bct'oro fro,m tl W fir*. They will bo »W»We»ftet&e wuw. J^WPM&j&WVwew all tU« bad OH flttKt.VnvB/l 1>.,'«.|,« U,.-..ln ,*. .*/'?'" ^,4?wUta% v • -*^'.sffiite^i^^-i«»^w I'I* J ^" • ^ •\.'"l'j r '',' > >' •• '•• '• ; J " "' *?f<w* •p r *V7 y*S?y iW^^MI'jJfleti' ' s , \ i_* '&,£-. «' A^feyK^I Ji r?.

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