Pittsburgh Post-Gazette from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on May 25, 1989 · Page 146
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Pittsburgh Post-Gazette from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania · Page 146

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24 Pittsburgh Post-Ga?cttc: Thursday, May 25, 1989 BASEBALL Major League standings National League Eaat Division W L Pot OB L10 8trak Horn Away Chicago Z4 19 .658 7-3 Won 2 12-10 12-8 Now York 22 19 .637 1 4-8 Loat 3 14-10 6-9 St. Loula 22 20 .624 IV 3-7 Lot! 1 14-8 8-12 Montreal 21 23 .477 3' 3-7 Loat 1 15-10 6-13 Philadelphia 18 23 .439 6 6-6 Won 2 9-13 9-10 Plrat 17 24 .416 8 8-6 Won 2 9-9 8-15 WhI Division W L Pet OB L10 Streak Homo Away Cincinnati 24 18 .671 7-3 Won 2 12-11 12-7 San Franciaco 24 19 .658 V 6-4 Won 3 11-7 13-12 San Diego 24 22 .522 2 7-3 Won 1 8-10 16-12 Lot Angelas 20 21 .488 3' 6-5 Lost 2 10-8 10-13 Houston 21 23 .477 4 6-4 Loat 3 10-16 11-7 Atlanta 19 25 .432 6 2-8 Lost 3 11-9 8-16 American League Eaal Division W L Pot OB L10 Streak Homo Away Cleveland 21 22 .488 5-6 Lost 1 9-9 12-13 Baltimore 20 21 .488 6-4 Won 2 11-11 9-10 Boston 20 21 .488 4-6 Won 1 10-8 10-13 New York 20 22 .476 ' 4-6 Lost 2 6-8 14-14 Milwaukee 18 24 .429 21 4-6 Won 1 10-8 8-16 Toronto 18 26 .409 3'- 6-4 Won 1 10-12 6-14 Detroit 17 25 .405 3' 6-4 Won 1 12-11 S-14 Waal Division W L Pet OB 110 Streak Homo Away Oakland 29 15 .659 6-4 Loat 1 19-7 10-6 California 28 15 .651 7-3 Won 1 18-9 10-6 Texas 24 18 .571 4 4-8 .Won2 13-9 11-9 Kansas City 25 19 .568 4 4-6 Loat 6 16-6 9-14 Seattle 23 22 .611 6' 5-5 Lost 2 15-11 8-11 Minnesota 20 23 .465 8' 6-5 Lost 1 11-11 9-12 Chicago 17 27 .366 12 3-7 Lost 5 6-15 11-12 National League Wednesday's results Pirates at Atlanta. St. Louis at Cincinnati. Chicago at Houston. Philadelphia at Los Angeles. New York at San Diego. Montreal at San Francisco. Friday's schedule Houston at Plratea, 7:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Chicago. 2:20 p.m. Atlanta at St. Louis. 8:35 p.m. New York at Los Angeles, 10:05 p.m. Montreal at San Olego. 10:05 p.m. Philadelphia at San Francisco. 10:35 p.m. Tuesday's results Pirate 5 Atlanta 2 Cincinnati 6 St. Louis 4 Chicago 5 Houston 4 San Diego 3 New York 2 Philadelphia 4 Los Angeles 1 San Francisco 4 Montreal 2 American League Wednesday's results California at New York. Seattle at Boston. Cleveland at Detroit. Minnesota at Toronto. Baltimore at Chicago. Oakland at Milwaukee. Kansas City at Texas. Friday's achedule - Oakland at New York, 7:30 p.m. California at Boston, 7:35 p.m. i Baltimore st Cleveland, 7:35 p.m. Chicago at Toronto, 7:35 p.m. ' Texas at Minnesota. 8:05 p.m. Seattle at Milwaukee, 6:30 p.m. Detroit at Kansas City, 8:35 p.m. Tuesday's results Detroit 7 Cleveland 2 Toronto 2 Minnesota 1 Boston 6 Seattle 5 Baltimore 9 Chicago 3 Milwaukee 9 Oakland 1 Texas 10 Kansas City 8 uaiitorma at New York, ppd., rain. Today's pitching formrecords as starters . National League Yr.lodits Vs.opp.etslte last! starts IMS 1M ins .(H) 04 Tbm W-t. ERA W-L ERA W-l BIA Drabek(H) - 7:40 1-5 2.29 1-0 8 2.25 0-2 18 3.50 Atlanta P. Smith (R) t-t p.m. 1-5 4.79 0-1 Vi 14.44 1-1 17 8.16 NeeYoric Cone(R) - 4:05 3-2 3.14 1-0 7 0.00 1-0 23(4 2.28 San Diego WNUon(R) Pick p.m. 6-2 2.39 0-1 6V 5.68 2-0 22VI 2.42 Montreal Martlnaz(R) - 4:05 3-1 3.05 1-0 7H 4.70 2-0 23V4 2.31 San Fran. Kruno (R) 6Vk-7V p.m. 3-1 3.24 0-0 6 1.50 2-1 15 3.00 Philadelphia Carman (L) - 10:05 1-8 4.08 0-1 4H 7.71 0-2 22Vt 2.42 Los Angelas Belcher (R) 6Vt-7V p.m. 3-4 2.21 1-0 9 2.00 1-2 22 1.64 American Laagua abas l(M) Yr.todate Vi.opo.Mitt Last I Marts lata iaa ism Odds Tins W-i, ERA W4. P ERA W4. P ERA Cleveland Farreil (R) - 1:35 2-4 3 88 0-0 6 1.50 0-3 19H 5.49 Detroit Tanans(L) iW p.m. 3-4 3.39 - - - 1-0 23 1.96 Oakland Stewart (R) E-t 2:30 8-1 3.34 2-0 17 2.12 2-1 21 4.84 Milwaukee Ckjtterbuclc(n) - p.m. 1-1 231 - - - 0-1 22 1.23 California Wltt(R) - 7:30 3-4 4.05 - - - 1-1 24 3.38 New York John(L) E-6 p.m. 2-7 5.55 1-1 15Vi 2.93 0-3 16V4 8.27 Seattle Dunne (R) - 7:35 1-2 7.48 - - - 1-1 16V4 6.61 Boston Smithon(R) eVt-71 p.m. 1-1 5.23 - - - 1-1 10V 5.23 Today's pick: Lot Angeles (Batcher )$i Bottom team Is home team. Favored team Is designated by odds beside pitcher' a name. All pitching data reflect the pitcher's past performance as a "starter." The odds are estimated Una. ii Best bet ii Above average play. 1$ Average play. Pirates calendar Home Thur. Fri. Sat. Sun. Mon, Tue. May 25 May 26 May 27 May 28 May 29 May 30 Atlanta Houston Houston" Houston Cincinnati Cincinnati 7:40p.m. 7:05 p.m. 7:05 p.m. 1:35 p.m. 1:35 p.m. 7:05 p.m. LEAGUE LSABIBS Baaed on 121 at-bata. Excluding yesterday's flames. American League National League v9 .373 Q AB R H Avg LansfordOak 43 156 28 57 .365 Balnea Chi 43 145 21 50 .345 A. Davis Sea 41 143 27 48 .336 Palmeiro Te 41 162 33 64 .333 Steinbach Osk 35 122 14 40 .328 Puckett Min 43 169 23 55 .325 FrancoTax 41 155 20 50 .323 UrtanoTor 40 125 16 40 .320 Gremwell Bsn 40 161 31 51 .317 Surra Tax 41 165 25 52 .315 ftUNS-McGrlff. Toronto. 34: Burks, Boston, 33; Palmeiro. Texas, 33: Greenweil, Boaton, 31; B. Jackson. Kansas City. 29. RBI-Franco. Texas. 30; A. Davis. Seattle, 33; Leonard, Seattle. 32; Sierra. Texas, 31; Kittle. Chicago. 29: McGNff. Toronto, 29. HiTS-Lansford. Oakland. 57; Puckett, Minnesota, 55: Gallagher, Chicago, 54; Palmeiro, Texas, 54; Reynolds, Seattle, 54. DOUBLE8-Puckett, Minnesota, 18; Lans-tord. Oakland, 13, Sierra, Texas, 13; Palmeiro, Texas, 12; R. Henderson, New York, 12. . TRIPLES-D. White. California. 7: P. Bradley, Baltimore, 6; Burks. Boston, 5; Reynolds, Seattle, 5: Boggs. Boston, 4; Polonla, Oakland, 4; Vount. Milwaukee. 4. HOME RUNS-B. Jackson. Kansas City, 1 1: Deer, Milwaukee. 11; McQrlff. Toronto, 10; Whltaker. Detroit. 10: Leonard. Seattle. 9; McGwire. Oakland. 9; Tettleton. Baltimore. 9. STOLEN BA8E8-Esoy. Texas. 19; R. Henderson, New York. 19: D. While. California, 17; B. Jackson, Kansas City, 15; Guillen. Chicago, 15 i PtTCHINa (9 declelone)-Stewart, Oakland. 8-1. .889. 3 34; Ballard. Baltimore. 7-1, .875. 2 19: McCasklll, California, 5-1, .833, 1 70; Montgomery, Kansas City. 5-1. .833, 2 25; Swindell, Cleveland, 4-1, .800, 2 92. STRIKEOUTS-Hyan, Texas, 79; Clemens. Boston. 65; Lsngston, Seattle. 60; Viola, Minnesota. 67; Swindell, Cleveland. 56. 8AVES-Eckersley. Oakland, 14: Schooler, Seattle. 11; Farr. Kansas City, 10; D.Jones. Cleveland. 9; Hernandez, Detroit, 8; Plesac, Milwaukee. 8; Russell, Texas, 8. O AB R H W. Clark SF 43 158 32 59 L Smith All 40 145 30 47 .324 LarkinCin 38 144 20 46 .319 HerrPhl 39 152 16 48 .318 Mitchell SF 43 165 24 62 .315 Grace Chi 43 153 14 48 .314 T. Gwynn SO 46 18S 29 58 .314 Butler SF 42 158 27 49 .310 Coleman StL 37 151 27 46 .305 DoranHtn 44 169 19 51 .302 RUN8-W. Clark, San Francisco. 32; L Smith, Atlanta, 30; T. Gwynn, San Diego, 29; 6 are tied with 27. RBI-Mitchell, San Francisco, 43; O'Neill, Cincinnati, 33; W.Clark, San Franciaco, 33; Guerrero, St. Louis, 32: Doran, Houston, 28; Galarraga, Montreal, 28; Schmidt, Philadelphia. 28. HIT8-W Clark, San Francisco, 59; T. Gwynn, San Diego, 58: Mitchell, San Francisco, 52; Doran, Houston, 51; R. Alomar, San Diego, 50. DOUBLES-Mltchell, San Franciaco, 16; Bonds, Pirates, 13; Guerrero, St. Loula, 13; Doran, Houston. 12; Murray, Los Angeles, 12; Sabo. Cincinnati, 12. TRIPLES-Ralnea, Montreal, 5; Dawson, Chicago, 4; R. Thompson, San Francisco, 4; T. Gwynn, San Diego, 4; W. Clark, San Franciaco. 4. HOME MJN8-Mltchell, San Francisco. 14; Strawberry, New York, 10; G. Davis, Houston, 9; H. Johnson, New York, 9; W. Clark, San Francisco. 8. STOLEN BA8CS-Coleman. St. Louis, 18; T. Gwynn. San Diego, 18; O. Nixon, Montreal, 14; Young. Houston, 13: L. Smith, Atlanta, 12; Sabo. Cincinnati, 12. PITCHING) (6 dclelon)-Glavlna. Atlanta, 5-1. 633. 2 57; Smiley, Pirates, 8-1, JU3, 2Mi B. Smith. Montreal. 4-1, .800, 2 18; Burke, Montreal. 4-1, .600, 3.91; Fernandez, New York. 4-1, .600. 3 26; Myers, New York, 4-1. 800, 0 75; Reuschel, San Francisco, 8-2, .800. 2 06. STRIKEOUTS-Gooden. New York, 63: De-Leon, St. Louis, 56; Scott, Houston, 58; Hurst, San Diego, 53: Herahiaer, Los Angelee, 62; RIo, Cincinnati. 52: Smoltz. Atlanta, 52. SAVES-Franco. Cincinnati, 14; Ma. Davis, San Diego. 14; Ml. Wllllsms, Chicago. 11: Burke, Montreal. 8; Lefferta, San Franciaco, 7; Myers, New York, 7. P83ATES DATA Doug Drabek, scheduled to start tonight's game against Atlanta, will be trying to stop his five-decision losing streak. One of those losses was a 5-2 decision against Atlanta In Three Rivers Stadium May 14. In Drabek's live losses, the Pirates have scored seven runs. Drebek has pitched once In Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium, working eight Innings and allowing two runs In a 14-2 win over the Braves last May 30 Entering last night's game, Pirates starters were 13-15 with a '3 17 earned run average. The bullpen was 4-9 with a 4.84 ERA. Agricultural report: Buffalo (21-22) was rained out against Rochester Tuesday. Harrisburg (16-17) was rained out at Canton-Akron. Salem ( 1 5-27) beat Peninsula, 8-3. Randy Tomlln (5-3) went seven Innings for the win. Left fielder Darwin Pennye (CQ) had three hits and two RBI. Third baseman John Wehner, from Carrlck, had double and two RBI. Augusta (31-16) lost to Greensboro, 3-1. Antonio Felix (4-3) pitched a complete game, allowing only three hits and striking out 10. Quick temper is causing Dibble trouble . .... a.i aan I By Joe Kay Associated Press Writer CINCINNATI - Rob Dibble's fastball sizzles toward home plate at 99 mph. His temper is just as quick. Dibble's fastball has established him as one of the best pitchers in the Cincinnati Reds' bullpen. His temper bas led to embarrassing episodes. The latest took place Tuesday night. Angry at himself for giving up an RBI single, Dibble picked up a bat and flung it halfway up the wire screen behind home plate, stunning the crowd and drawing an immediate ejection and fine. The display also could result in a further fine and suspension by the Reds, who suspended outfielder Kal Daniels for two days last season when he angrily flung his bat into the dugout after a strikeout in Chicago. Dibble, 25, was crestfallen. "I'm not as crazy as I appear to be," he said, as part of a public apology after the game. "Sometimes the frustration gets to you. Sometimes you do stupid things. This ranks at the top of my list." It's a rather long list for a second-year pitcher. Dibble's temper was well-known in the minors. He was thrown out of a game for Class AAA Nashville in 1987 for throwing a pitch too close to a Louisville batter. Angry, be charged the umpire. "I'm not as crazy as I appear to be. Sometimes the frustration gets to you. " pitcher Ron Dibble "I lost my head and went after the umpire," Dibble said. "My teammates had to restrain me. I was fined then." He was fined again this spring after one of his more colorful outbursts. Upset that he gave up a home run during an exhibition game in Plant City, Fla., Dibble dented picnic tables at the Reds' training complex with a bat and flung metal folding chairs into a pond. At least twice this season he's taunted opponents on the field with his gestures and words, drawing angry glares from the opposing bench. He's also been known to fire his glove at the bench as he returns to the dugout after a bad inning. "That's one reason why he's a good pitcher his temper and his temperament," Manager Pete Rose said. Dibble agrees. "I'll never lose all that," he said. "I'm just a -competitor. Sometimes I'm overcompetitive." His competitiveness got the best of him Tuesday. Dibble rescued starter Danny Jackson from sixtn-inning trouble in a 6-4 victory over St. Louis, escaped another threat in the seventh, and then gave up an RBI single to Terry Pendleton in the eighth. As he ran to back up catcher Jeff Reed on the single, he picked up Pendleton's bat and fired it halfway up the screen, which shook with the force of the impact. He was immediately ejected by home plate umpire Joe West, and got a post-game lecture from Rose. The incident stunned the crowd, which included owner Marge Schott, who was sitting a couple of sections away from the edge of the screen. "That's the first time I've ever seen that," Rose said. "I saw him pick it up, and I said, 'What's he going to do with that bat?' " "I've never seen that before," Cardinals Manager Whitey Herzog said. Rose indicated the Reds would take further disciplinary action against Dibble, who was glad the bat didn't slip out of his hands and land in the stands on his fling. Dibble said the incident will help him become more mature in handling his frustrations one of the major hurdles for the young pitcher. "It'll never happen again. I just thank God it didn't go 10 feet higher and go into the stands," he said. "It's part of growing up," reliever John Franco said. "He'll be all right. I've messed up a couple of lockers in my time, but it wasn't in front of everybody." Bo blasts one N f If A 1 E ' - 1 ' 5 v y ' , VC :--v' s y ii '"I iiiliiliMhr i a nr irr..v , ' ' m ' ln llillinilillllll Associated Press Kansas City Royals slugger Bo Jackson rips at a pitch from Nolan Ryan during Tuesday night's game against the Rangers in Arlington, Texas. Jackson, who had struck out every previous time he faced Ryan, hit a 46 1-foot homer off him in the fifth Inning. The Rangers, however, won the game, 10-8. Fates kind to Bucs in win over Braves Gregg brave in face of injury timeout FROM PAGE 23 "I probably had a stress fracture in that foot for a year," Gregg said. "I'd have pain on the top of the foot. That night, I was in a rundown, and when I turned to go back to first base, I felt something sharp in there. The next night, I dove for a ball, and I heard it snap. I thought, 'Well, there goes that foot.' " For the last month, Gregg has been fairly-miserable. "By the third week, it was real depressing," he said. "The foot wasn't coming along very quickly. But then, in just one week, it really came on. I think I can pinch-hit by this weekend and hopefully I'll be able to play by Monday. I've been going crazy starting out so well and then doing nothing for four or five weeks. But I'm not coming back until the foot tells me I'm ready. I don't want to do anything to jeopardize it and have to go through all this again." When Gregg returns, he probably won't be a platoon player. "I've had a chance to see the rest of the outfielders," Manager Russ Nixon said. "When Tommy's ready, I'm going to stick him out there every day. I like the way he plays hard, aggressive and that means something to the team. This turned out to be a real good deal for us." "It's the best thing that ever happened to me," Gregg said. "Nothing against Pittsburgh. The Pirates treated me great. But there's a lot of opportunity here. It's up to me to take advantage of it. Hopefully, I'll pick up where I left off. "My goal was to be in the major leagues. I got there with the Pirates, but I was mostly a pinch hitter. I really didn't feel like I was needed. Here, I feel like part of the team. That's when I play best when I feel like they need me in there. "I feel like that here." FROM PAGE 23 "I was trying to stay away from all those lefties on their bench," Leyland said. "They bad five of them over there waiting to get at Smiley. My philosophy was that he'd held that lineup to one run for eight innings, and I was trying to stay away from a bomb by Dar-rell Evans or Dion James." "I'm glad he stuck with me," Smiley said. "That kept my confidence up. I wasn't giving in to anybody. I thought I could get them out." Smiley jumped ahead of Benedict 0-and-2, evened the count at 2-and-2 and then got the bouncer to third baseman Bobby Bonilla that ended the game. "I felt great tonight," Smiley said. "That's the best mound in the league. I think it helped my curve ball and changeup. Once I got my changeup down, they started swinging and missing. Once they do that, you've got them. You can throw a changeup, come in with a fastball and go right back to the changeup in the dirt." The Pirates did very little against left-hander Zane Smith (1-7) in the early innings. He gave them only two hits and struck out six. But bis luck changed in the sixth. With one out, Andy Van Slyke singled. Bonilla forced him at second base. Then Wilson lined the next pitch to the top of the left-field wall and was more than a little happy to watch it bounce over. Wilson, who singled in the fourth inning, has hit .372 (16-for-43), with five extra-base hits and eight RBI, in his last 11 starts and raised his batting average from .195 to .256. "You know I read on the plane in USA Today that I was hot," Wilson said. "But, heck, it was pretty comfortable on the plane." Wilson's home run, his first-ever in this stadium, was his sixth of the season, one more than he hit all of last season with the Seattle Mariners and Pirates. "All I need now is 12 more RBIs to have a better year than last year," said Wilson, who had a total of 32 RBI in 1988. The Pirates got the three runs that decided the game in the seventh. With one out, Junior Ortiz doubled. After Smiley flied to center, Barry Bonds lifted a high fly deep into the left-field corner. Berroa, playing in the absence of Lonnie Smith, who's on the disabled list with a sprained ankle, chased the ball but stumbled slightly when he stepped onto the track. That PIRATES BOX Tuesday' game Pirates S, Atlanta 2 PWATE ATLANTA abrhM abrhbl Bonds It 6 10 0 Osnl 3b 4 0 0 0 Una 2t 3 111 Blaussr2b 4 111 VanSlvkef 40 10 G Parry 1b 4 120 Bonilla 3b 3 10 0 DMrphy d 3 0 0 0 GWIIaon rf 4 12 2 Thomas sa 4 0 0 0 Radus lb 2 0 0 0 Barroa II 4 0 3 1 Dtstlno 1b 1 0 0 0 Russall rf 4 0 10 ROunna aa 4 0 10 Banadid e 4 0 0 0 Orttze 4 110 ZSmlthp 2 0 10 Smiley p 4 0 0 0 Asnmchr p 0 0 0 0 Ackar p 0 0 0 0 JDavts ph 10 0 0 Pulaop 0 0 0 0 Total 34 3 Totals 34 1 1 Pkatae 000 002 300 Atlanta 100 000 0022 E Russall, Barroa. Q Parry. OP Atlanta 1. LOB Plrataa 6. Atlanta 6. 2B OrtU, GPerry. HR Blauaer (2), QWIIson (6). Plrata pitching Ip h r ar bb as SmlKyW.S-l 8 2 2 1 0 Atlanta pitching Ip h r ar bb aa ZSmlth 1,1-7 02-3 6 S 2 3 6 Asanmchr 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 Ackar 1 0 0 0 0 0 Pukto 1 0 0 0 0 0 Umpiras Home. Engai: First. Rungs; Second, Rennert: Third. Brocklander. T 2:16. A 6,137. cost him. He didn't quite reach the ball, which fell for a two-base error, enabling Ortiz to score. Jose Land lined a single that fell just in front of Berroa in center, and third base coach flana T amAnr uroiraH in Hnnric UViilW UHlllVllb T vy a, a uviiuu, who easily beat Berroa's offline throw. Lind went to second on the throw to the plate and scored when Perry threw away Van Slyke's ground ball deep behind first base for an error. "Certainly, you give the players credit for capitalizing on that situation," Leyland said. "But Gene Lamont made two pretty good decisions, too. He scored Bonds on that sharp single to short left field by Lind , and he had Chico Lind coming around all the way on Andy's ball. It was a good combination. The players hustled, and Gene was aggressive." NOTES Sid Bream, out with a mild sprain of his right knee, said his knee felt better and he thought he could pinch-hit Tuesday night. However, he doesn't think he'll be able to start a game until this weekend. . . . The Pirates Tuesday signed outfielder Albert Hall, 31, to a Buffalo contract. Hall was released by Atlanta March 31 The Pirates made some other moves in the farm system Tuesday. Left-hander Tim Conroy, from Gateway High School, was placed on Buffalo's disabled list because of a sore left shoulder. Right-hander Orlando Lind, who was 4-0 with a 1.96 ERA for Harrisburg, was promoted to Buffalo, along with catcher Andy Hall. And infield-er Jim Pankovits, who hit .183 in 29 games for Buffalo, was sold to Albuquerque. PIRATES STATS deluding ysetardafs gam Batting Al H 2b tb HR RBI Avg. Haaton 16 2 7 0 0 0 2 ,3t9 Bernard 51 4 15 3 0 0 4 .294 Reynolds 117 19 34 8 0 2 9 .291 Bonala 160 26 45 9 2 5 22 .288 -UValhar 25 J 7 0 0 0 5 .280 Van Slyke 61 12 17 4 0 1 8 .279 Wak 22 0 0 1 0 . 5 .273 Bond. 166 27 43 13 2 5 12 .259 Warn 121 19 31 3 1 5 21 .256 Rooks 40 6 10 4 0 0 3 .250 Braam 34 3 9 3 0 0 4 .235 Qmnonas 82 6 16 2 0 2 17 310 Und 148 17 32 3 0 1 10 .216 Ortiz 77 7 18 0 0 0 8 .208 Dtsteiano 37 3 8 1 0 0 3 .162 Orabak 20 1 3 0 0 0 1 .150 Cangelasl 36 6 5 1 0 0 3 .139 Prince 36 1 S 4 0 0 5 .139 Obertttel 40 2 6 0 0 0 2 .125 Csner 16 2 2 1 0 1 3 .125 Bell 20 0 1 0 0 0 0 .050 Smiley 25 0 1 0 0 0 0 MO Kramer 700000 0 000 FoMr 200000 0.O0O Eaaiey 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Kiooar 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Robmaon 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Taylor 100000 0 .000 Pitching III H ER 88 BO ERA '-Gott 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 00 Landnna 0 10 14 6 1 t 6 1 08 Kramer 1 1 0 20 4 14 5 10 9 2 21 OrabeK 1 S 0 83 51 16 22 29 2 29 Smiley S 1 0 69 57 19 12 44 2 48 Kiooar 1 0 ! 17 8 11 18 3 18 Walk 4 3 0 64 46 25 19 21 3 52 Haaton 1 4 0 S1 47 21 17 16 3 66 Mm 0 1 0 8H 8 4 5 4 59 Easley 1 0 1 7' 7 5 2 i III RoMiaon 2 4 4 19 25 14 9 12 61 Fanar 0 1184 11 6 3 4 6 48 Madden 100 58 4 3 47 20 Taylor 010 4 8 5 4 2964 '-On disabled net HOMf ATTEND AMCC (11 gamee) 1989 - 256.257 (Aug. 14.2371 1988 - 337. 159 Ag. 18.731) Griffey Jr.'s neck injury diagnosed as bruise From wire dispatches BOSTON The Seattle Mariners' star rookie, Ken Griffey Jr., suffered a bruise on the back of his neck when he crashed into the center-field wall at Fenway Park making a catch in a Tuesday game against the Boston Red Sox. He was taken to Massachusetts General Hospital for examination of his head, neck and back. Mariners spokesman David Aust said yesterday that X-rays showed there was no break in Griffey's neck, and doctors said he can play. Griffey's neck was sore and it will be a day-to-day decision on whether he will play, Aust said. SAN BERNARDINO, Calif. - Ex-minor leaguer Don Johnson didn't sell his soul for another shot at baseball stardom he just lied about his age. The 32-year-old first baseman declared himself 22 and stepped into the starting lineup at San Bernardino Valley College. But when the truth was discovered earlier this month, his teammates were forced to forfeit 30 victories and their conference championship. "He was just another kid like all of them, so hungry for the game," San Bernardino baseball coach Stan Sanchez said. "I guess baseball was such a big part of bis life and this was a last hurrah." Johnson, who has refused comment on the incident, showed up at San Bernardino this spring with a troubled tale that included jail time. Johnson, saying he had just come down from Oregon with his wife and family, said he was trying to get his life back together. But he left out the part about playing in the minor leagues for the Seattle Mariners and the Oakland A's. His age wasn't checked because transcripts aren't needed to enter the two-year school, and school officials believed the rest of his story. Johnson was hitting .364 with a half-dozen home runs, and San Bernardino posted a 30-13 record. But the fantasy ended when Johnson was spotted by Dennis Rogers, a Cal State Fullerton assistant coach who had managed the Oakland's Medford, Ore., farm team in the early 1980s. Rogers watched Johnson hit and something clicked. After Rogers voiced his suspicions college officials began an investigation. Confronted by Sanchez on May 2 and asked for proof he was not the ex-professional player, Johnson promised to return in 20 minutes with verification. He never did. The incident left Johnson's ex-teammates disillusioned and school officials shaking their heads. "Maybe you'd think of yourself doing this, playing ball again, but how could you not think of the effect this would have on your teammates?" Watkins said. NEW YORK Marvin Miller says Commissioner A. Bartlett Giamatti has no" -I V.I rt S.tArtA Daia UacA "Giamatti, I don't have to tell you, he comes from about the only institution in the country as right wing and arrogant as the baseball owners namely academia, where notions of due process or just cause are completely foreign," Miller said. "They know about as much about due process as the Hottentots." Hottentots are a pastoral African people. The retired executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Association said one of his key accomplishments was setting up a grievance procedure for players, where an impartial arbitrator decides disputes. But managers, he pointed , out, don't have that protection. Giamatti's spokesman was read Miller's remarks, and the commissioner's response was pointed. "With consummate deftness, Mr. Miller manages to insult or defame people's color, . . . teachers and intellectuals that is, core constituencies of today's labor movement," the commissioner saidi through a spokesman. '

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