The Monroe News-Star from Monroe, Louisiana on January 2, 1946 · Page 6
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The Monroe News-Star from Monroe, Louisiana · Page 6

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Wednesday, January 2, 1946
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PAGE SIX THE MO N ROE (L A.) NEWS-STAR JANUARY 2. 1946 MIAMI WINS ON LAST PLAY, 13-6 Hudson's Poss Interception Gives 'Cones Orange Bow! Victory By Wilbur Jennings MIAMI. Fla.. Jan. 2 (.¿Pi-The Cinderella University of Miami football team won a fairy godmother victory, 13-6. over Holy Cross in the Orange Bowl Tuesday with an electrifying 89- yard run on an intercepted pass in the last second of the game. Substitute A1 Hudson, former high school athlete, reached high to snag a forward pass hy Holy Cross' Eugene De Fiiiopo and was off like a bolt of lightning toward the goal line Amazed, the record throng of 38.000 hardly knew what was happening until Hudson raced across to score. Until that moment, it seemed apparent to all that the score would end in a 6-6 tie. Both sides had fought grimly, doggedly. with each looking for an opening. Then the fairy god-mother waved her wand, figuratively, at least, and Hudson was off like a gazelle The magic touch was that the hall fell into the hands of the fleetest man t>n the Miami team. Hudson was Florida State ‘rrint champion in high school Harry Ghaul nut the final accent on the million dollar climax, one of the most sensational in gridiron history, by kicking the extra point as the crowd went wild. So late did the play come that had the hail not been in motion, the game would have ended midway of Hudson's long run. But since a play was underway, the end-of-the-game whistle was held up until Hudson crossed the goal and Ghauls extra point had registered. The first period showed no fireworks and few drives. The second sparkled with two touchdowns, one by each team. Miami gained its six points bv a dash around right on i b\ Joe Krull. Ghaul's kick was low. Big Stanley Koslowski, the Crusaders’ ailing star, snapped a dynamite pass to Walter Brennan to score for Holy Cross. Koslowski’s kick was wide, uid the 6-6 tie remained on the tally boards until it seemed it had to be there permanently. Spectators were saying “this is the first tie finish for any of the 14 annual Orange Bowl games’’ when a magic wand was waved and the University of Miami Hurricanes rode a pigskin carriage to f.tme. The lineups: THE HOY WHO MADE GOOD MöTAU SUCCESS SToR/ES !tJ SPORTS ARB ABOUT 6-FOOTERS.. THERE'S 4..SO THAT LITTLE FELLOE FROM s JS l ES' UTAH ... TRIPPI TRAMPS ON HURRICANES Bulldog Back Leads Georgia To 20-6 Oil Bowl Triumph ' 3s,e DAO HE HOPPED A T7A/F to chic a so to S-E n D UA CAT OKI IA/ i TH hi'S BROTHER, a JOCKEi "A k JO from that if HÜMEL c BEClhlKllh 3 ) JOB DEAN JESSOP ‘ BECAME T m E seasons MOS r T u NH ln S c S T JOCÑ,r NOT ONLV T m ATT RET PA/O HEP ¡T! "HE Li RED horses , took A JO3 /a THE S"AB l ES" A: J. Us/~ ij* Bv Skipper Patrick HOUSTON, Texas. Jan. 2.-bP>- Cha’lev (The Men) Trippi, 180-pounds of football perfection fiom Pi>*ston, Pa . electrifi'd a near capacity crowd of 27,i)>V) Oil Bowl fans here Tuesday as he led his Georgia Bulldogs to a 20 t > 6 victory over the Golden Hurricane of Tulsa University. Kept away from the goal line tor three quaiicrs and with Georgia leading by a single point, 7-6. as the last stanza got under way, Trippi ¿tunned the gallant Hurricanes with a perfectly executed 54-yard pass play to Vards lost by penalties 35 John Donaldson who took the ball eight yards out and dashed across. Wig. seven minutes of play remaining in the game, Trippi grabbed a Tuisa punt on the Georgia 31-yard j stripe, reversed his fi?ld ar.d streaked ! down the south sideline for another j touchde v n. Three Tulsans got them | hands on the Georgia flyer but could not bring him doan. The Build >gs excelled in every department of play, hut the Hurricanes, SUGAR BOWL NEW ORLEANS, Jan. 2.—</F>~ Statistics of the 12th annual Sugar Bowl football game: St. Mary's First downs .................. 8 Yards gained rushing (net) ........................... 61 Forward passes attempted ....................... 24 Forward passes completed ......................... 11 Yards by forward passing ........................177 Forward passes intercepted by .................... 4 Yards gained run bark of int. passes.............. 43 8 Total yards all kicks returned ......................132 Opponents fumbles recovered ..........................0 ALABAMA ROLLS ROUGHSHOD (URTIS DEFENDS OVER SOUTHERN CAL., 34-14 TITLE THURSDAY Okla. A. and !M. 15 217 13 112 Crimson Bowl Into Rout; Trojans Score In Last Period Risks Crown Against Masked Demon ♦Tide Turns Rose yards- That v;n :he ccond pe Liqht-Hcavy Champion iod. A few m.nut u later, the Ala- s bamans scorched 45 yards, right halt Lowell Tew, his broken jaw protected by a leather device, plunging across from the two yard marker. By Russ Newland Hov, compl tels Southern California j PASADENA. Jan, 2.~(/Pi Clcatc-d was held in heck by the lighter Aln- stars trom Alabama purged, poundeci bama team was reflected in the fact and dazzled So them California‘s bul- | the Trojans were unable to cross mid- t» ky Trojans to a 34 to 14 defeat Tues- i field until the third period when tney j Curt: Ah tucli f 1 ;< : ,.<nce of womwj wn le. » on tomorrow nights mal car.! . no will : . >vc quite a magnet) the customers, the return of Jacl^ light-hea vywe i ghM 472 105 2 45 ROSE BOWL PASADENA. Jan. 1.—(zP)—Alabama- Southern California Rose Bowl statistics: Ala. Troj. Total fir.^t downs ...............18 3 Net yardage gained from running plays ...................292 6 Forward passes a 'tempted .12 11 Forward passes completed . 4 2 Forward passes intercepted day while ‘J3.00J fans thrilled to one ! of the most cxcit- i ing Rose Bowl | games in many years. Striking swiftly, scoring the first time they laid hands on the ball, the maroon jersied j swiftie from the Old South outplayed and out maneuvered t h e i : western r ’ v a 1 a Harry Gilmer throughout most of the game. world got. to within thirty yards of goal. I champi will pro t as lUftai t First downs were 18 to 3 and South- the mat addict 1 f th..» ru e, . and Pi°*l crn California made only six yards moter Gus Kallio expects his ,rsj| net from running plays—a department program of the ye r to ‘tract a crowol in which Alabama ioiled the stagger that will bn hard to better throug ^ ing net total of 192. the rest of 1916. Net yards from rushing and passes; Curtis, the Vicksburg, Miss., flash were 351 for the visitors and 17 for who has long been a favorite with old-1 the home guards Alabama’s sixth trip to the Ro.»e Bowl was decisive to say the least. It made four victories and one defeat and one tie for the ’Banians in football’s most colorful and oldest postseason classic. While Gilmer enjoyed the main i, i i ___ , t ,u starring role, with his pogo passu g It was an Alabama rout from the , , ,. . , , . ,, i 1 broken field and close L running, his OKLAHOMA A. AND M. SINKS GAELS OF ST. MARY’S, 33-13 Total net vards gained, i un- ning and passes............ ...351 11 Average length of punt s ..19.50 48.00 Total vardage of punt returns ................................ ...92 15 Yards lost on penalties . ... 35 15 Opponents fumbles revered .............. ... 3 1 COTTON BOWL DALLAS. Jan. 1.— <R) —Missouri- Holv CrossPos. Miami Dieekelman ........LE... Delgrande Donnalley ...........LT.... .... Frantz Kronoff ..........LG ...> • • • . Cameron Stephenson..........C.......... ,,,, .... Levitt Cregar ..........RG.... ... .. Dimacco Stronnv ... ........RT,... • ♦ * . Corrigan Conway ... ..........RE ... • • * i .......... Mell Lemay ..........Q3 ...• • • .. Mazejka Koslowski ..........LH.... » • • • .... Krull Byers .................RH.... . • • • . Bowman Conroy .........FB.... ___ Ghaul Score by quarters; Holy Cross 06 0 0-6 Miami .....0 6 0 7-13 Holy Cross scoring:Touchdowns: Brennan, Miami; touchdowns, Krull. Hudson. Points after touchdown, Ghaul. Holy Cross subs: Ends—Parkei. Durand. Tackles— Spinelli, Desroches, Sicuvanza, Delisle. Donnalley. Guards —Zuaro, Goepfrich, Kronoff, Kelly. Backs—Brennan. Bryson, Codere. Defilippo. Miami subs: Ends—Mell, Hagan. Dibuono. Tackles—September. Guards— Cameron, Whittle. Pinckney. Centers— Smith. Backs—Hudson, Jones, Angelus. Dornigney, Hancock, Injay- choyck. Krasnai, Doyle, Mazeicka. DEAN JESSOP LEADING RACE JOCKEY FOR 1945 MIAMI, Fla., Jan. 2.—(zP)—Jockey Job Dean Jessop, the nation’s oui- standing race horse jockey in 1945 closed the year with 290 winners m the record books Jack Westrop holds the all time record with 301 winners. As he started the new year in the saddle at Gulfstream Park, Jessop said: “1 tried right to the end to beai Jack Westrope’s record, and now that it s all over 1 feel quite relieved. We all start Ihe new year even and 1 hope I’ll be fortunate enough to be leader again in 1946.’’ Jessop is a native of Utah. AT G IS K \ LI.IO’S ARENA MAE WESTON Women's W restling Match Thurs., Jan. 3, 8 P. M. Double Main Event JEAN MEYERS MAE WESTON JACK (TRTIS THE MASKED DEMON ROEI ER SKATING Every’ Night Except Thursday Sessions—7 P M. to 10 P. M. ADMISSION PRICES Ringside Seats ...$i 66 Plus Fed .34 Ta* General Admission School Children $ 2.00 S1.25 Plus Fed. .25 Tax . 83 Plus Fed. .17 Tax $1.00 For Further Information Call 4883 Fenimore, Wedemeyer Thrill South’s Biggest Grid Crowd In Sugar Bowl By Kri» Kret-ger NEW ORLEANS. Jan. 2.-vP)-The Cowbojs of Oklahoma A. and M. were too big and troi g for the Gaels of St. Mary's and won the 12th annual Sugar Bowl game 33 to 13 aft er one of the mus' spectacular displays ofwide-ope.i football ever seen here. All-A rn e r i c a n Halfbacks Boo Fenimore of A. and M. and Herman Wedemeyer of St Mary's lived up to their advance billing and staged a dutd that thoroughly sati'fted the estimated 75,000 fans—the largtst crowd ever to ee a football game in the south. Fenimore had an edge in rushing, gaining 130 yards on 25 trips to Wedemeyer s 29 yards on seven tries. Bui Little Herman had an advantage in the air completing nine passes in 18 attempts fur 155 vards. Fenimore nit w ith only four t ut of 11, for 76 yards. Fenimore definitely had more help m the duel, especially from a big line that opened many holes in the Gael defense and made running plays by St, Mary’s viiUtally impossible. Spike Cordeiro. the little Gael halfback who ran through far western opposition like a nervous gnat, apparently had not recovered from a recent attack of influenza and never could get away for a run of any length. The Gaels, outweighed and out- manned, were definitely favorites with the spectators who yelled and sciearned at the spreaders, down-field laterals, and daring pass plays with which the Californians tried to overcome tneir physical disadvantages. St. Mary's scored first on a sensational Wedemeyer pass after six minutes of play. Fenimore ran and passed the Aggies right hack to a touchdown, and the Oklahomans were never headed thereaftei. The Gaels’ first score came after six minutes of play. Wedemeyer took Fenimores quick kick on the St Mary 25 and iateralled to Wes Busco. who ran it to tire Aggie 47. On the next play Wedemeyer took a lateral from Spike Cordeiro and threw a long forward to Dennis O’Connor, who was behind Fenimore on the 10- yard line, and sprinted on across as the Aggie All-American missed a futile dive at him. Wedemeyer place- kicked the extra point. Fenimore personally engineered a 64-yard scoring drive after the ensuing kickoff He passed to Cecil Hankins for 19, ran left end for 15. hit right tacke for one, missed another fiass, and then looped a long one which Hankins took in as he crossed the goal line. Indian Jim Reynolds tied the score with a place kick, St Mary s got into a hole when Cordeiro tumbled while returning the next kickoff, ana Hankins recoveted on the Gael 44. O’Connor intercepted two passes to stop Aggie threats, hut early in the second period Fenimore returned Wedemeyer’s punt from the Gael 45 to the 31, setting up another score. Jim Parmer plunged to the 19 on two plays; Fenimore took a double lateral to the one and then went over through a huge hole at right tackle. Reynolds again place-kicked the extra point. St. Mary’s brought the Aggie kickoff back to score. The Gaels worked the ball to A. and M. s 44, and from there Wedemeyer slithered around ighl end to the 20. Then hr slipped tiie ball to Guard Carl De Salvo, who went over for a touchdown Wedemeyer’s place kick was wide to the right. The Gaels put on a series of amazing plays on a drive to the Aggie 19. but Wedemeyer narrowly missed with a touchdown pass to Ed Ryan and A. and M. took over as the ‘¡rst half ended. Late in the first period Fenimore’t 65-yard quick kick and a clipping penalty put St. Mary’s deep in a hole. Fenimore took Wedemeyer’s fine punt on the 50 and returned to the Gaels seven where Wedemeyer dropped him. Three line plays took the ball to the one-foot line and Fenimore barged over right guard for a touch­ down. Wes Busch and Don Schultz blocked Reynolds’ place kick and it was A and M. 20. St. Mary's 13. Neill Armstrong, the Aggies' big left end, blocked and recovered a Wedemeyer punt on the Gaels' 34 to set up the fourth Aggie touchdown late m the final period. Reynolds and Fenimore bulled it to the one-yard line in six plays and Reynold.» plunged it over Reynolds again place-kicked the extra point. The Aggies scored again on the la.»t play of the game. With the ball o:i the 20-yard line. Reynolds shot s pass which a Gael back knocked into Bob Thomas' hands, and Thomas went across for the touchdown. Reynolds’ placement was blocked and the final score was Oklahoma A. and M, 33, St. Mary's 13—the biggest margin of victory in any Sugar Bowl game. The lineups: Pos. ... LE ... ,LT .... LG ... C’ ... RG. HT. RE. QB. LH. RH. FB Oda. A. & M N. Armstrong J. D. Cheek J. C. Colhouer M. Wilkerson T. Gay .... Bert Cole .... G. Moore ... N. Watson . B Fenimore .. C. Hankins J Parmer 0 0-13 6 13—33 Touchdowns: St. Mary’s D Schultz ___ A1 Beasley ... C De Salvo .. Vie Cuccia .... Bill Bland .... H. Van Giesen Ed Ryan ......... D. O’Connor . H Wedemeyer C. Cordeiro W. Busch ....... Score hy quarters; St. Mary's ___ 7 Okla. A. and M. .. 7 St. Mary's seo r in O’C 'nnnor. De Salvo. Points after touchdown: Wedemeyer (placement1. Oklahoma A. and M. scoring— Touchdowns: Hankins, Fenimore 2. Reynolds, Thomas (for Fenimore» Point»- after touchdown — Reynolds (for Parmer) 3, (placements). Substitutions— St. Mary’s: Ends. Adkins; tackles. Murphy: Adair; guards, Bryant. Quinn; centers. Farleigh: backs Crowe, Adams. Oklahoma A. and M -Ends; Van Pool, Long; tackles. Monroe, Howell, guards, Duckette, Faucett; centers, Schellstede, backs, Grimes, Loyd. Reynolds, Thomas. TENNESSEE STATE BEATS TEX. COLLEGE IN VULCAN BIRMINGHAM Ala., Jan. 2.—(zP) — Nine thousand spectators looker! on Tuesday as Tennessee State tallied in every period to completely outclass Texas College, 33-6. in Birmingham’s annual Negro classic, the Vulcan Bowl. Ralph Pulley, Holbert, Washington, Wiley Leonard and William Bass registered the five Tennessee markers. Three of them resulted from power plays, one was made on an aerial and the other stemmed from a blocked punt. The T e x a n s’ lone touchdown, chalked up in the final period, came on two passes that netted 70 yards Winters took Robinson’s heave for the tally. Score by periods: Tennessee State ................7 6 13 7—33 Texas College ....................0 0 0 6—6 CLINIC FOR GIRLS' CAGE COACHES SLATED HERE A clinic for coaches of girls basketball teams will be held Saturday at the Northeast College gymnasium here, it was announced last night. The even is sponsored by the women's advisory board of the Louisiana High School Athletic Association, and w ill be conducted by Mrs. Elizabeth Manhein, chairman of tiie district committee with the assistance of Miss Ada Bess Hart, N. J. C. Coaches of all girls’ teams in this section of the state have been invited to attend the clinic which begins at 9 a. m. Saturday. L caches and referees from various parts of the state will participate in the demonstrations and lectures, including Miss Velma Bar bin. Marksville, who has officiated in girls state championship tournaments for the past eight years. A demonstration game between »»jxtets from Columbia and Baskin High Schools will be a teature of the afternoon section rlaying »heir fifth straight bowl game Total vardage gained from made the going lougu all the way. forward passes ................. 59 Cha les ’Rabbit” Smith. 155-pound Total yards intercepted wing back, put Georgia ahead in the passes returned .................... 2 first six minutes of play on a ioucV- | down from the three-yaid line after ja drive on thirty-one vards Georg? Jetmigan kicked the point from placement ar.d it appeared the Bulldogs had things pretty much then own wav until Tulsa recovered a fumble in the sx’ond round and fullback Wilvon crashed over from 2-feet out. Brady Brown, tiie game’.-, stai uunter, missed from placement and Tulsa's ’ .coring was ended. Jernigan Texas football statistics kicked ooth The Georgia charity points. Playing in coal clear weather, Geor gia gol tiie jump on the Hurricanes .md were in »eriaus trouble only once, when their own rruscue set up Tulsa's touchdown. D.rn Edwards Georgia end, returned the opening kickoff 20 yards. Don a id | son -kimmed •ught end to the Bulldog.»* forty-six and Trippi picked up 2-yards in two plays. The threat ended on Tulsa’i 18 when Do-aidscn fumbled and tackle Forrest Grieg, a 290-pounder recov»red for the Hwrri- ; canes. Tulsa coulJn't grin, howeve:. rnd i when Brown’s punt went out on the Hurricane:-' 31-yard »trine. Georgia ■ hammered tor the first touchdown. Trippi get six yards, then Smith moved to the four on three plays and T ippi plunged a foot snort of a score. Rauch lost three stripes at center. nut on the next plav Smith went over and Jerniaan converted Brow i fl-yard quiek-k;ck hat relied over the Georgia goal set the stage for a fumble hy the Bulldogs' Ji hn Rauch and the Tulsa touchdown. Rauch fumbled when he attempted a pass and Grigg covered for fuisa on the thirteen Wilson »mashed m to the line three times and got a first down on the two Brown cairicd to the two-foot mark from where Wilson drove acr,.«.» A 61-yard run by Trippi in the second quarter, which followed a 71- vard punt by Brown that rolled dead on Georgia’s three-yard line, was nullified by a cliLpng penalty. Trippi completed 5 of lj passes for 110 vaids and ruslma the ball 12 times for 59 yards. Bob Hcllinghausen, Tulsa center was the game’s top defensive star Time and aeain the 180-pound veteran nailer! Georgia punt receivers in their tracks. Geoigia led in first downs, 14 to 7, in rushing 178 yards to 69, and in passing. 11C to 79. The lineups: 1 35 11 GEORGIA Pus. TULSA Edwards ........ ... LE .. .......... Phillips Castronis ...... LT ................. Grigg St. John ........ ... LG . .............. Tliomas Cooley ............ .. C .. . Helhnghausen Miller .............. ... RG.. ..............Morgan Sanders ......... ... RT ............. Stanley Tere? hinski .. ... RF Rauch .............. ... QB . .............. Brown Mo.Tex. First downs ........................... 22 19 Yards gained rushing (net) 408 202 Forward passes attempted. 17 14 Forward passes completed 4 13 Yards by forward passing 106 264 Forward passes intercepted by ........................................... 0 1 Yards gained runback of int. passes ........................... 0 2 Punting average ' r o m scrimmage .......................... 37 41.5 Total yards all kicks returned .................................. 92 81 Opponent fumbles recovered ............................ 1 1 Yards lost by penalties .. 30 35 OIL BOWL HOUSTON. Tex.. Jan. 1.— (/P)— Georgia-Tulsa Oil Bowl footbal statistics. (iti. Tulsa First downs ............................. 14 t Yards gained rushing net 178 69 Forward passes attempted .. 15 21 Forward passes completed . . 56 Yds. gained forward passing 110 79 Forward passes intercepted by ............................................... . 0 1 Yards gained run-back of intercepted passes ............ 0 1 Punting average from serimma *e ......................... >6.5 35.6 Total yards all kicks returned ................................. 127 87 Opponents fumble, recovered ................................... . 2 1 Yards lost by penalties .. 29 40 EAST-WEST SAN FRANCISCO. Jan. 1.- -f/P)— Statistics of the East-West ¡tame: East West First downs ............................. 18 14 Yards gained rushing (net) 124 46 Forward passes attempted .. 6 8 Yard by forward passes ... 69 89 Yards lost attempted forward passes .......................... 689 Forward passes intercepted by ............................................. 6 1 Yards gained runback of int. passes ................................. . 64 8 Punting average (from scrimmage) ........................... 29 38.5 Total yards all kicks returned .................................... 51 122 Opponents fumbles recovered ....................................... 23 Yards lost by penalties........ 60 30 | start. Coach Frank Thomas’ boys, undefeated in their regular season. | snatched a touchdown six minutes af- i ter the opening kickoff. Two more touchdowns w'ere posted j | on the score board in the second period as the baffled Trojans grabbed ! at the elusive Alabama backs, led by sophomore sensation Harry Gilmer ol Birmingham. The Trojans simply j couldn’t stop the Alabamans who I rolled up ten first downs to none i in the first half. Ihe count then was 20 - 0 . They came back for a third period yardage march to chalk up then fourth touchdown. That display made the score 27 to Alabama 0 and Southern California’s big team Soutnem C alif looked strictly amateurish by com; parison. Alabama teammates in general mad«' a fine showing for themselves. Tiie lineups: Alabama Pr.s.Southern Calif Steiner ... ............LE .......... Adelman Whitler .. ..........LT .............. Musick Wozniak ............LG. ............ Vasicek Mancha .............C.. Green .... ..........RG. ............... Rea Flowers .. ..........RT. ............ Aguirre Cain .......... ..........RE . ........ Willimson Self .......... ............QB .......... Bowman Gilmer ...............LH. .............. Morris Tew .......... ............RH. ..... Tannehill Hodges ..........FB.. Score by quarters; time wrestling fans and idol of the*; school boys here, is returning to Monroe for the first time in several monthsj|; for a championship scrap with tl Masked Demon. ^ The Demon, unt leniified iny^tery^ man of the t ing. has inlormed Promoter Kallio th t if he is successful in wrestling the title from Curtis he will remove his m r»k and identify himself If beaten he will remain the Mask Demon. The title scrap is one half of also in-C elude, a scratchiest between Jeanl Mvers. colorful worn ,:i wivtler of® Cincinnati. O., and Mae Weston,! 13 0 0 7-34 j 14-14 13. Sugar Bou I Oklahoma A. and M. 33, St. Mary’s 9 When the Crimson Tide rolled to after touchdown, Morrow (for Self» their fifth score early in the fourth j ’• period, spectators began moving for Southern C alifornia scoring Tviurh- the exits. Tiie 31st Rose Bowl classic \ downs; Adelman. Clark (for Aide- had become so one-sided it had; man). Points after touchdown. Bow- reached the stage of boredom—34 to 0 man. Lilly white (for Bowman». | The Trojans saved themselves {rom | Substitutions-A 1 a b a m a: End*. I complete humiliation, however, as the! Grantham, Gibson, tackles, Ca» ly.. minutes ticked off in the closing *u"d*. Burh Fillippine; center Gam- ; quarter. Twice in quick succession I ^re^; backs, Mor row, Corditt, Pettus. j they crossed the Alabama goal. Grant, Scales, Robertson, redak. , „ , . ,l Southern California—Ends: Clark, One was a touchoown pass caught Schinw Rl,ec] Schade; tackles. Recover the goal. The other came fromjrin> pesar Romcr Doornbos. Kuards,, ! Albee. Lardizabal. McGinn. Heinberg; blocked punt, and a short run Alabama's lighter, (aster squad j —M^oYrnkkLba'cks'.'Liilidt'hit;; up to advance notice. they. & 0 Headley. Ragan. Law- lined up in sunny, sultry weather as McNutt Harvcv 3 to 1 favorites. As the contest turned 1 ’ ’ . lived HALL HEADS WRITERS out the odds could have been 10 to 1 | Jack Greene, Alabama right guard | from Steubenville, Ohio, paved the; way for the initial score. Trojan half- 1 DALLAS, Tex., Jan. 2.—oPj—Flem back Bobby Morris fumbled on his R. Hall of the Fort Worth Star-Tele- j own 17-yard line. Greene was there gram was elected president of the to snag the oval. Quarterback Henry I Texas Sports Writers Association at Alabama scoring—Touchdowns: Self (2», Gilmer. Tew, Hodges. Points! Rose BouJ Alabama 34, Southern California 1-1, Cotton Bowl Texas 40, Missouri 27. Orange Bowl Miami 13, Holv Cross 6. Oil Bowl Georgia 20, Tulsa 6. Sun Bowl New Mexico 34, Denver 24. Raisin Bow 1 Drake 13, Fresno State 12. Shrine Game East 7, West 7. (tie). Tokyo Bowl lltli Airborne Division 25, 41st Division 12. ’Gator Bow 1 Wake Forest 26, South Carolina 14. Vulcan Bowl Tennessee State 33, Texas College 6. Coconut Bowl Bethune-Cookman 32, Albany (Gs.) Teachers 0. Azalea Bowl Knoxville University 18, Florida N. VtJtHllH.-IU.H.H ltV.lt v | HilKH t.eeuv.UdUt, n i. j j Self went over from the one-foot \ its winter meeting here Tuesday. He 1 * u* n ,i line on a quarterback sneak. Actually succeeds Weldon Hart of the Austin T . i*wer, , the Southerners gained 22 yards on I American-Statesman Louisiana (Grambling) Normal 19, the scoring series, having been set} Bruce Layer of the Houston Post Lane Col ege 6. __________ back five yards on a penalty. I was named vice-president and Harold Self, incidentally, scored the first V. Ratcliff of the Associated Press was and last Alabama touchdowns. In the re-elected secretary-treasurer. Direc- las-t period he caught a pass from | tors named were Fred Maly, San Ar- Gilmer and ran 14 yards. . tonio Express and News; Jinx Tucker, In between, rubber-legged Gilmer. Waco News-Tribune; George White, the standout of the game, broke Dallas News; Hal Sayles, Abilene Re- through the line for one yard, the j porter-News and Bill Lee, Corpus final effort of ar. Alabama thrust ot Christi Caller-Times. —WHISKEY Package Liquor Store 109 N. GRAND FREE DELIVERY RHONE 2347 T ipp ................. LH................ R. Smith j Donaldson ........ RII............... Simmons j Chesra .................. FB Wilson ; Score by quarters: GEORGIA .................... 7 0 0 13-20 TULSA ........................... 0 6 0 Georgia scoring: Touchdowns, Smith, Donaldson, Trippi PELICAN QUINTET BOWS TO CALHOUN The Louisiana Training Institute’s 0— 6 basketball team, after two pre-Chrurt- C. mas defeats, returned to action yes- Points af- terday to drop a game to the Calhoun ter touchdo.vns, Jernigan (2) sub for High School quintet 30 to 12. It w'as Miller olacenients. Tulsa Touchdown, Wilson. Substitutes. Georgia—Ends, Moseley, scoring: Calhoun's second win over the Pelicans during the current campaign. Yesterday’s game opened a full Sellers; schedule o ften games, three tourna- GAELS SMOTHER GLOOM tackles. Perhach; guards, Alexander, ments, and poss.ble four more con- Pope; center. Plant; backs, Smith, tests vet to be scheduled for the Pels Jernigan, Gordon, Jeffery, Steiner, it was announced. Frank- Tomorrow the Pelicans will meet Tulsa—Ends, Lot?, Mendel; taekeLs. the Okaloosa High School Indians Worthington. Hayes; Guards, Arm- here, and next Mondav they invade strong. Morgan. Lagreca; center, Pre- Oak Ridge. On January 11-12 they witt; backs, King, Perkins, Boone, will be participating in the Columbia Kowalski. | tournament. Other regularly scheduled games include Oak Ridge, here, Jan. 14; WITH FLURRIES OF SONG í?raysor- ,hJreA Jan 172 ol;al00^ there, Jan. 21; Grayson, here. Jan. 24; ¡ lwrmr nonrive t i m Lake Providence, there, Jan. 28; Lake j NEW ORLEANS, Jan. l-MV-The Provldcncc, hw Jan „. 0Ua.sta„d- Gaels of St. Marys filed into the,, ard 0„ Fcb . Qlla-Standard. dressing room, some slamming their r» k -,n „ ’ ... , n vu here, i*eb. 11. lTiey will play in the helmets onto the floor, some sobbing, vr, A ,, * . it,' , i e, ., • , f Northeast Junior College tournament ?n. íi 1 C ! ’ nf? Feb. »-3: and «.„ter the North Louiai- in* by a b,gger and stronger Okla- ana Ra„ ,(| f Fed 22.33. homa A and M. team in the Sugar j, ^ Bf)wl 6 Open dates on tne L. T. 1. schedule For a minute no one spoke, such ®re. Feb’ U*18-25'^ any teams was the gloom of defeat after a gal- deSln,‘K pames on ^ dates are rt*' lant fight. Then someone shouted ,“Aw. it’s just another ball game, fellow's.” A voice? began singing. It was a school song, 'On To Victory.” Other voices took up the tune. Then came “Tiie Red and Blue," Alma Mater of St. Mary’s. Spontaneously, the boys went on (o ‘‘Workin’ On the Railroad.” As the quested to communicate with Princi- pa1 Kermit Youngblood. L. T. I. (12) Pos. (3fli Calhoun Vincer.t <8) ........... F......... (15) Pipe» Landry (1» ........... F........ (2) Walker i Herring (3) ............ C............ (8) Calk | Pleasant G (5) Frost Hanson ................... G Humble Substitutes: L. T. I.—LeVasseur. Valentine, Davis, Michelet, Futch. volume of song grew, the blues dis- ^uen- (-Mhoun Nolan, White, Graves appeared. The sound of rushing water c:nd Chatman. START QUALIFYING TODAY in the showers blended with the harmony: “ ----------- someone's in the kitchen with Dinah, “Strummin’ on the old banjo.” FIGHTS LAST NIGHT »Bv A«soc'a'.«?ri Press» MILWAUKEE—Doll Raffen, Milwaukee, outpointed Dave loux, 135. Montreal, 10. LOS ANGELES. Jan. 2.-(/P)-Goif- dom's near-great Degin qualifying rounds over seven courses Wednesday for the $13,333 Los Angeles Open Tournament starting Friday. The 136, "great” don’t have to qualify. Casti- Tiie qualifying round, over 36 holes, I will determine the 60 to 70 positions ; LAWRENCE, Mass.—The blond ti- remaining to be filled on the player j ger, 129, Lowell, outpointed Archie roster. Gibbons, 133, U. S. navy, 8. \ Tournament officials report that SALEM. Mass.—Tommy Greb, 133, | most of the big names of the spoit Boston, outpointed Steve Beilus, 137, will be on hand for the opening Toronto, 8. »round. Remember it’s "A TREÀSURt IN BEER FROM TNE CELIARE OF FORTUNE Listen to CARSON ROBISON and his Buckaroos every Tuesday, 7:15 P. M. over Station KMLB

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