The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on August 12, 1943 · Page 9
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 9

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Algona, Iowa
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Thursday, August 12, 1943
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Page 9
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The AlgonS (type* ftifc Moirtes, Algottfl, Iowa, August 12, 1943 TheBaiiteof North Africa by Corporal Harold Banwart (Continued from last week) Then our troops started to move the last part of March. They reached Fonduk with little resistance. It was here they mot stiff enemy resistance and were forced to stop. Here we saw plenty of enemy planes and could see them shell with their artillery. Many of the shells came close. Again we rested. This time for only^a Very few days while more . men" and eqquipment moved into place. At last the time came to crack this Fonduk pass. The artillery, infantry and armored units did the job well. Here Captain Cady and I' visited Trosa, a small mining town. Then we also hitch-hiked a ride with the infantry to Karanyan, the holy Arab city. Seven trips to there equals one to Mecca. It is a typical city for over there. Very old and dirty and filthy. The very few French there were very glad to see us. It was here that I got my fir.st look at the great British Eighth Army. They had Rommel on the run, from-Sfax to Sousse, and they were keeping him moving. There were brown desert vehicles and. the soldiers were dusty and looked tired, but they only stopped long enough to get their pot of tea brewed (typical of the British army) and they were off again in their lorries. The first large group of prisoners I saw was near here. / We were told that our part of the campaign had ended and we would be given a few days to rest. It was a very few, because soon we were on a secret move from this central front to the northern front. During the last phase of the battle our division took Hill 609. This hill looks more like a giant rock jutting up in the air 1800 feet. From this hill one has around, and it helps to have that observation. The capturing of this hill was a close miracle. Tha British are still wondering how the infantry could take it. The sides are almost verticle and are solid rock. Now we camped ' near Matuv. So far we haven't seen Bizertu or Tunis, but hope it will be possible. There were many prisoners taken, and please don't underestimate the enemy. They do have a fine army, but we have a good army also, and after a little experience at the front, we dev^- oped a fine army. Another thing some people think the British can't fight. Well after being with them and knowing them, I'll say they are some of the finest soldiers in this world and they can fight. Now about the prisoners. They have told us that they expected to* lose Bizerta and Tunis, but the Allies could never get Oran and Algiers; they were too heavily fortified, so with North Africa entirely in the hands of the Allies, it is easy to see how little they actually are allowed to hear. Enough for the war. There are many side lights that developed along the way. Some of the hardships we have had to face are the following. Overloaded supply routes that found only room for food and ammunition, so the obtaining of new clothes became out of the question, except in cases where one's clothes were no longer of any value. The food has been very plain. Often we have lived for days on the "C" rations. These consist of five crackers, a can of soluble coffee and three lumps of sugar. Then a can of hash, stew, or meat and beans. This diet becomes very tiresome after weeks and months of it, but we didn't mind. The only fresh meat we ever had was chickens we got from Arabs and that was only twice. We were short of water many times having only enough to drink and so went days without shaving or washing. Our clothes became filthy between washings. We are all getting a chance to take showers now During the battle of Fonduk our artillery' shot up 487 tons of ammunition in one day, and towards the last few days and weeks of the war saw many allied planes. The sky almost continuously had some planes in it. (Continued next week) IT'S HARVEST TIME AT SUPER VALU • UPCR VALU ITOREB OFFER A HARVEST OF VALUES IN ALL AVAIL. ABLE FOODS AT EVERY DAV LOW MONEV-SAVINQ PRICES. CHECK THE VALUES LISTED HERE. SEE WHAT VOU CAVE. MARY STEVENS KITCHEN FRESH SALAD DRESSING r<" 21< GRANDMA'S SUGAR SAVING 4* Jfe ' 4* 4fc MOLASSES K 23< a 39< BREAKFAST CF CHAMPIONS —* ~- -». WHEATIES 2 » 20< RICH, FUU FLAVOR, SATISFYING ' «ti& 4%4t 18K COFFEE '« 28 ( 32* MARGARINE 28< POST TOASTIES 11 OZ. ^«[> PKG. PRIQCK I* THIS AD, EXCEPT ««' PEflfSHABL1«; HUARANTEED-" A> 1 ...r*...»V> THRU THURSDAY. «UO. 1»Ul.'• •" . < TRU VU ..?• i$> EVJOW OLD DUTCH MACARONI REGULAR OR QUICK COOKING QUAKER OATS • OR SPAGHETTI 1 LB. CELLO PKG. 48 OZ. PKG. 11 22< Cleanser 7< SWEETHEART Soap3-19c 29c Tenderoni 2^ " " ISe Queen Thrown Pack Burry'i Olives e.,.j.r23c Crax Van Camps _ . * ,. . J •» Arlitocrtt Soda IIC Crackers N BM . Pk » 11 Polnu Each 2 No. 2 9Qf> ' "Ho'ton"' RtD. *r lodlicd ID oz. on, BjWv Cfllf 9 wdll • £ okoi. Oolleoe Inn 2 Point! Each , * "" Chili Dinners 2 01/1 2Tc Ll '" uld «••««» umii Dinners z ., lie pekfo 2 AS 25c 24 01. pko. 8C Burry'l § Miplt 8yrup_MH PretZel StlX 10n. Ptg. 15C Macamix 3 P k ( i. I3c o«n.r«i m.>on 2-po. I Mary Lynni Vltamlitd Aind. Jgf COVCrS doitn SOUP MIX Z'/, 01. Hail I3C oomplew Ration Dalryland Evaporated 1 Red Point Each If.Q DnO* Moal .1 7 ° 1 ' Uili. O 14V4 01. t)e M •» B WWg lOBBI «t pkgi. MIIK 3 cam COC U I Sunrlch l\'9 D0£ 11681 2 Ib. pkg. I 9C Wheat Flakes a... Pk ,. 8c No RU b SUN RICH, FRESH, CRISP Com Flakes PKG. Hominy Grits FIAV-O-RITE IMITATION VANILLA BOHLE _, . Bran Flakes i B o, P k 0 . ln 1 Oc Shoe White • n . bM u. I5c Sunrlch Wheat Cereal Reg. of B-Mlnul* Cr. off Wheat Mary Sleveni 1 I4c Gloss Starch i, 6 . Pk o. 6c WhIU Laundry Soap ' '' - 24c Wash Well I0 u r4lc Faihlon, 650 Sheet Corn Starch i,b P k,. 6e Toilet Tissue 4 ,„,„ 19c MAGIC BAKE ENRICHED FLOUR ^ IB SACK GOLD MEDAL tf! 1 ! QB FLOUR " LB SACK Ifl.99 BALL MASON TOP SEAL FRUIT JARS QUARTS $2.45 SUPER VALU STORES SAVE YOU MONEY Creamery Butter £l d j Ib. 46c U. S. GOOD ROUND STEAK, 13 Pts. - Ib. 39c CHOICE CUTS BEEF ROAST, 9 Pts. - Ib. 29c SMALL WEINERS, Grade A, S Pts. - Ib. 29c FANCY SLICED BACON, 8 Pts. - - Ib. 36c FRESH PORK LIVER, 4 Pts - - - Ib. 19c •VV' ':*.:•>'.• • ••••'• '"-;. ( "•• * "-•• -v-f.- < • •" -.,,,••'-•.,. .•.-.- ^«r &> JSj| ifiL^a v& >mTS^ J^iJK QfM Vouir Meig'Hbosrlioodl F«>«o>d Store Algona WAC Promoted Miss Mray E. Grubb, Algona girl who joined the WAC at Des Moines last January, has been promoted to the grade of Technical Corporal. She is stationed nt McChord Field, Washington. Miss Grubb is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jess G. Grubb, Route Two Algona. Local friends will be pleased to hear of Miss Grubb's advancement. -K THOMAS E. FARRELL NOW IN ALABAMA AIR CORPS Thomas E. Farrell is now at Tuscaloosa, Alabama, where he ic taking a course of instruction of approximately five months prior to his appointment as an aviation cadet in the army air corps. He will take numerous academic courses as well as elementary training in flying. After complet* ing the course he will be classified as a navigator, pilot or bombardier, and will continue training in these specialties. Eleanor Bormann and friend from Des Moines pent the weekend at the home of Eleanor's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Nick Bormann. Notice of Probate of Will STATE OF IOWA KOSSUTH COUNTY, ss. IN DISTRICT COURT No. 5057 March Term 1943 To all whom it may concern: You are hereby notified, that an instrument of writing purporting to be the last Will and Testament of William Rusch, deceased, dated July 10th, 1930, having been this day filed, opened and read Tuesday, the 7th day of September, 1943, is fixed for hearing proof of same at the Court House in Algona Iowa, before the District Court of said County, or the Clerk of said Court; and at 10 o'clock A. M- of the day above mentioned all persons interested are hereby notified and required to appear, and show cause if any they have, why said instrument should not be probated and allowed as and for the last Will and Testament of said deceased. Dated at Algona, Iowa, Auguat 4, 1943. HELEN WHITE, Clerk of District Court. 32-34 Alma Pearson, Deputy. LINNAN & LYNCH, Attorneys Notice of Probate of Will STATE OF IOWA KOSSUTH COUNTY, ss. IN DISTRICT COURT No. 5058 March Term 1943 To all whom it may concern: You are hereby notified, that an instrument of writing purporting to be the last Will and Testament of Amelia Wermerson, deceased, dated June 30, 1941, having been this day filed, opened and read Tuesday, the 7th day of September, 1943, is fixed for hearing proof of same at the Court House in Algona Iowa, before the District Court of said County, or the Clerk of said Court; and at 10 o'clock A. M. of the day above mentioned all persons interested are hereby notified and required to appear, and show cause if any they have, why said instrument should not be probated and allowed as and for the last Will and Testament of said deceased. Dated at Algona, Iowa, August 5, 1943. HELEN WHITE, Clerk of District Court. 32-34 Alma Pearson, Deputy. LINNAN & LYNCH, Attorneys Notice of Probate of Will STATE OF IOWA KOSSUTH COUNTY, ss. IN DISTRICT COURT No. 5056 March Term 1943 To all whom it may concern: You are hereby notified, that an instrument of writing purposing to be the last Will and Testament of Dell Reibsamen, deceased, dated Feb. 6, 1939, having been this day filed, opened and read, Tuesday, the 31st day of August, 1943, is fixed for hearing proof of same at the Court House in Algona, Iowa, before the District Court of said County, or the Clerk of said Court; and at 10 o'clock A. M. of the day above mentioned all persons interested are heifeby notified and required to appear, and show cause if any they have, why said instrument should not be probated and allowed as and for the last Will and Testament of said deceased. Date at Algona, Iowa, August 4, 1943. HELEN WHITE, Clerk of District Court. HUTCHISON & HUTCHISON, 31-33 ' Attorneys. Joe Dunn, salary H. S. Roth, salary C. U. Pollard, salary... Ira Kohl, salary Adah Carlson, salary Bertha E. Johnson, la. bor Diesel Service, gas Norton Machine Works, mdse. „ Westinghouse Elec. Supply, mdse. —. Graybar Elec. Co.', mdse. Northland Elec. Supply, mdse. Iowa Blind Products, mdse. Theo B. Robertson Products Co., mdse. Malleable Iron Range Co., mdse. . Panama Carbon Co., mdse. R'y Express Agency, express . Dutch's Super Service, service Kossuth Oil Co., gas .__ Algona Laundry, service Laing & Muckey, repairs Kohlhaas, Hdw., mdse._ Pratt Electric Co., mdse. F. S. Norton & Son, mdse. Botsford Lumber Co., mdse. Brown's Studio, mdse.__ A. H. Borchardt. mdse._ Treas. of State, sales tax Northwestern. Bell, service Western Union, service- Tax fund, tax WATER FUND Harry Barton, salary Frank Ostrum, salary __ Joe Dunn, salary Ray S. Barton, salary.- C. U. Pollard', salary .. Ira Kohl, salary Laura Mitchell, salary. _ Neptune Meter Co., repairs Culligan Zeolite Co., mdse. Brady Transfer, freight. R'y Express Agency, express Norton Mach. Works, repairs Buffalo Meter Co., mdse. Kossuth Oil Co., gas Matt Parrott & Sons Co., mdse. Treasurer of State, tax- Tax Fund, tax ' GENERAL FUND A. R. Moulds, salary Tim O'Brien, salary Cecil McGinnis, salary. Alvis Hill, salary Kossuth Motor Sales, repairs Algona Hdw., mdse. N. W. Bell Tel., Service Ernst Moe., gas Tim O'Brien, expense. _ Jesse Lashbrook, salary r Elliott Skilling, salary.. .Chas. Harvey, salary __ Fay Minnard, salary John Helmers, salary __ Kohlhaas Hdw., mdse C. S. Johnson, mdse. ._ The Chrischilles Store, mdse. Algona Implement Co., mdse. Botsford Lmbr. Co., mdse. Kossuth Co. ImpL, mdse. Algona Hdw., mdse. Brady Transfer, freight- Dutch's Super Service, mdse. Chas. Heard, repairs 50.20 79.00 100.60 43.7 78.40 6.26 319.40 83.77 31.71 3.35 132.59 39.47 29.31 1.37 10.09 2.55 13.29 25.24 6.97 3.86 1.49 5.95 4.59 1.97 10.20 3.98 462.20 22.15 1.31 55.59 78.38 72.40 11.20 39.50 25.00 22.50 61.20 2.93 111.16 7.69 .26 2.15 210.38 12.28 25.90 61.62 15.52 73.53 69.89 69.89 65.12 8.21 1.18 6.13 20.06 22.00 80.80 81.71 51.71 51.71 51.71 6.69 1.79 3.84 6.34 1.02 1.17 .91 8.93 16.51 24.25 Continental Oil Co., gas 14.52 Ken Frank!, gas 1.75 R. P. Irons, mdse. ^ 2.00 Algona Upper Des Moines, publish. _.L__ 10.95 Advance Pub. Co., publish. :.._•.— 57.29 Geo. Dettman, salary 40.00 Tax Fund, tax 9.05 SEWER FUND C. U. Pollard, salary ._ 20.00 FIRE MAINTENANCE FUND Algona Fire Dept., serv. 96.00 Kossuth Oil Co., serv.. 6.00 Mike's D-X Station, gas 3.06 Dutch's Super Serv., gas 6.80 N. W. Bell Tel., service 4.34 COMFORT STATION FUND Mrs. A. M. Collinson, salary 20.00 F. E. Sawyer, rent.! 25.00 DEPOSIT FUND B. B. Baldwin, Sec., refund 5.00 Alfred Schultz, refund. 5.00 SWIMMING POOL FUND M. C. Nelson, salary... 49.28 Mary Helen McEnroe, salary 31.20 Inez Harris, salary 29.20 Charlotte Johnson, salary _ _, 27.50 Earl Bowman,, salary 51.70 Botsford Lmbr. Co., v mdse. 9.14 Theo. B. Robertson Products, mdse. 44.47 McKesson & Robbins, mdse. 11.37 Kohlhaas Hdw., mdse. .45 Algona Laundry, ser- vice ,._-.,_—. X lt.13 N. W. Bell Tel., 8C*V... . 3.48 Advance Pub. Co., mdse. _._>.. ^..s.^i. 14.89 Treasurer of State, tax 18.28 Tax Fund, tax — 3.12 Passed and approved this 29th day of July, 1943. FRANK KOHLHAAS, Mayoi 1 . ADAH CARLSON, . City Clerk. IT'S Balance THAT PAYSI GIVE YOUR HOGS Balance your^orn ration—reduce your feeding costs. Mlnrol M«af Meal contain! minerals, proteins, and conditioners all in one bag—the elements experts say can save 5 • ' - •- -• •- bu. corn for everv 100-lb. gain, compared with • IPhone 631 East Stale Production for Victory starts on the farms All America is justly proud of the production achievements of our great war factories. Too few Americans, however, realize the tremendous blow for victory now being struck by the fanner. Never before in history have the farmers and stockmen of this nation been called upon to produce so much—not only to feed and clothe our fighting forces and civilian population, but also to help meet the heavy requirements of our allies. . Despite the serious shortage of manpower and the drastic priorities on materials and equipment, the men . . . and the women . . . who work the soil are winning the vital battle of production. Our Agricultural Agents and other Milwaukee Road workers keep in daily contact with the men and women on the farms, the ranches and in the orchards along our lines. We know our neighbors — and they are giving their utmost in time, thought and effort to meet every demand for the products of their land and labor. For this they deserve everlasting honor and credit. •. • - . The farm families along The Milwaukee Road may never win individual notice in the headlines—but they are getting the job done. 'MILWAUKEE^ ST. PAUL I THE MILWAUKEE ROAD 11,000-MILE SUPPLY LINE FOR WAR AND HOME FRONTS " 'WHAT DOES MEIN TO US ?' I' COUNCIL MINUTES July 29, 1943. The City Council met at the City Hall in regular session. All councilmen were present The minutes were read and approved. Permits to construct sidewalks were granted to Dana Paxson, T. H.. Chrischilles, and Mrs. J. T. Chrischilles. City employes' salaries were fixed as follows: C. U, Pollard, $335; Adah Carlson, $175; Laura Mitchell, $145; Ira Kohl, $145; F. C. Dailey. $185; 'Leo Bellock, $170; Tom Halpip, $170; W. Gorman, $170; H. Barton, $170; E. Bowman, $140; C, C. Wright, $130; W. Ludwig, $145; Alvis Hill, $125; H. 3. Roth, $175; H. E. Stephenson, $165; -Frank Ostrum, $165; Ray Barton, $130; C. Webb, $135:'Joe l?unn, $135; A. R. Moulds, $155; C. McGinnis, $147.50; T- O'Brien, $147.50; J. Lashbrook , $170; E. Skilling, $170; Chas. Harvey, $110: F. Minard, $110; J. Helmers, $110; Mrs. A, Collinson, $25; George Dettman, $50; Bertha Johnson, per hour, 50c; E. Theil, per hour, BOc. , Appropriating Ordinance • No, 601 was passed ' Adjourned. BILLS ALLOWED ELECTRIC LICJHT FUND L. M. -B^lqfffe saiary P . 74.40 F. C. Dailey, salary _ r . 8J.OO torn Helpn, salary 77.00 Walter Gorman, salary, , 78.38 C. C. Wright, salary __, Earl Bowman, {salary — Wm, o, Ludwig, sslaiy-' R. S, Barton, salary,,-, H. E. jj^tepfcfinsjpn. sal* - 78,90 . 63.40 14.55 ASEKGFA/W... A HOME-MflKER... AN /OVM WKMEK give their views on this timely question SAYS THB SERGEANT: "Butter's an important part of our fighting-radon—and it represents the way-of-life (hat we're fighting for, "Don't gel me wrong. In the army, or any branch of service, we CAN eat our bread without butter^and plenty of us . have done it, 38ut good food s«re helps keep our men in fighting trim—and pne thing we real'y go for, is Butter, We're proud to come from »land that l»Heves everyone is entitled to butter, instead of tinororing jj j||J f 0r jj ^ CW • SUpeiTTien'. A'**A Af\tnrf all vmrA ^*rm tft *?«%A^^4 4-lUa And we're doing all we can to speed the <Jay when our nation can again get all we want of good things like butter that *re part of the American way of life." SAYS THE HOME-MAKER: * "Butter is one of our greatest helps in making ration * meals more nourishing and appetizing, "Of necessity, unrationed foods play a bigger part in our meahplanning this year-^foods like potatoes, fresh vegetables, bread—and butter makes them so much more palatable. $o we buy butter every week—and enjoy some at nearly every meal. Of course, if it would help any toward winning the war, our whole family would do without butter from now until the day of Victory, put we're glad that, even after our service men Jiave had all they need, there's butter for «s here at home, too." SAYS THE IOWA FARMER; "Butter brings me over $500 a year in cash., and cows provide increaseJfer* tility that keeps my land in'shape, "Milking cows just naturally goes with good Iowa farming, Last year, dairy foods brought Iowa over $lOp,09t>,00Q cash income—^and three dollars,out of every four ca,me from butter, Most 9! us Iowa farmers aretft equipped or located so thai we can seB whole, fnjfe But our local creamery provides a. good, market for our buUerfat, 904 front there, our butter goes «U ever tb« wwwl' In fact, butter is |be badkHiong gij^ff : year when crearo-ci»ec£? kepj u? p In ipodern diversified farming t» practised in Iowa, butter ha«i an important place, since butter provides the logical market-outlet for most of Iowa's dairy production. More than 150,000 Iowa farmera^receive cash income from bj||« comes contribi*tiQ» IOWA DAIRY INDUSTRY COM

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