The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on September 29, 1942 · Page 1
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 1

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Algona, Iowa
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Tuesday, September 29, 1942
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• X « ) f< '! i V PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH PACKED _ _ v6| Inspltatfon^. akd Weil Attended; Sixteen Members on Roll The three day program lw ob^ i serving the 86th anniversary of the Algona Presbyterian church reach- 1 ' ed' Inspirational heights Sunday "wrien sixteen new, members we're • fece'fVed into the church and six Infants baptized following the annl- • versary sefrrton delivered by the pastor, Rev. C. Cv Richardson. Opening on Wednesday evening with Dr. Wm. Ji Bell, Minneapolis, speaker, and John McDowell, reading a history of the church, the celebra- 'tlon continued through to the morn, ing services Sunday. . , Thursday Sessions With the Fort Dodge 'Presbytery, in session here Thursday ah interesting meeting was held in the afternoon with Dr. Wm. Howell, Naw York, the principal speaker. In the evening an Informal "birthday party" was held In the basement of the Church. 'A large birthday cake, carrying 85 candles, was cut by Mrs. C. B, Mtirtagh and roses were presented to the two living charter "members of the reorganized church, Ji>hn Magnusson, 88, and Mrs. John Olson, 91. Sunday Services The church was filled to capacity Sunday morning when the pastor delivered: the anniversary sermon. At this service, too, sixteen new members were received into the church and six Infants were baptized. The new members were Miss Phyllis Frasler, Miss Betty Tumor, , Mr. and "Mrs. .Chas. Wolfe, Mrs. John Guderlan, Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Kurtz, Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Hackbarth, George Pollard, Claud 1 ^ Pollard, Russ Waller, Marjorle Mitchell, Mr. and Mrs. Dwight Hartl- grove an<jl Mrs. lola Bell. The li f - tle ones baptized were Cynthia, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Hardy;'-Thomas Jerome, son of Mr/and Mrs. Brown; William, son of Mr. and Mrs. Dwight Hardgrove; James, son of Mr. and Mrs. liloyd- Pratt; Pamela, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. .Russ Waller; and, Mary, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Bell. Church Receives. Gifts Birthday gifts ; were announced given as follows: New American flag by, Mrs. C. B, Murtagh; new 'Christ'an flag by Mrs. Hugh Herman in memory of Mr. Herman and Lenora;. hew pulpit light by Mn and Mrs. Dennis Pratt; birthday cake toy Mr. and? Mrs,. L r .F. Rice; anniversary: flowers by-Mr. and Mrs. August; 'Huenhold; and new altar cloths, the giver asking name to be withheld. REV.HJPURNS VOt. 71.—NO. 3!) ALGONA, IOWA, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29,1942 Established 1865 AUTO CRASH FATALTO WEST BEND GIRL . . . • 'v-' '"-. '••"•:.; ; ••• " .;'•'•—' ~~ ..••• _ ~ ^~T~L *T~ --. • ., «i. i HELEN FORD, 22, Reported Missing In Action Get In the Scrap and Do It Quickly 18 Carloads of Scrap lion Shipped Out oi Here In Thirty Days ' Mr. and Mrs. Theodore O. Thompson, 60*8 S. Minnesota, received a message from the war department in Washington Monday stating that their sqn, Donald V., was missing in action. He was in the Phillip- Ine Islands, had been there since late in December. On March PASTORATE Following jhis pastorate of the Methodist church here for two years, Rev. Harry M. Burns and family will leave Friday of this week for Sioux City where Rev. Burns has been assigned to the Whitfleld Methodist church of that cjty. The Whit- flelfl congregatfon is one of the larger of the eleven in the ,clty and the^church is located on North Fifth street in one of the finer residence districts. .Rev. .Burns came : here from Humboldt where he was the M. B. pastor for six years, and prior to "that served In'the M. E. church in Webster City; The;Burns, family made many friends durlngr residence in Algona and their leaving Is regretted by AJ«ona residents. "Bill' Burns,'popular s and musical senior, will take up hU work in Sioux Cf-ty, With an eye to the higher learning in MorningaJd* college there. «ev. N. A. Price,-,successor to Rev. Burns will arrive in Algona this week and'preach his first sermon here Sunday morning. • The Price family consists of four younger children. •'-•;"••.;'.* ;.;, .;i ;''• ••• COMBINE OWNERS TO HOLD ever, he returned to service. The family had not heard from him since in January. And the let-. ters they had written to him were returned here with the notation uncalled for, the first word received of him was that which came Monday. He may be a prisoner of the Japs now holding the Philli'pi.nes. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson have another son, Maurice, serving in the navy. "' Jens Sorensen, prominent V. F. W. member and Union township farmer, has conluded he 'will wear white shirt for a week if he and the farmers in his township and their sponsor, the Veterans of For- e?.gn Wars, can't dig out more scrap iron from Union township than can be' rounded up in Qresco township with the help of the 'Junior Chamber of Commerce headed, by BiU Sharp. On the other hand Bill is betting on Cresco and the Jaycees so' strong""(sinbe" the latter have already demonstrated their ability .'•n getting the junk out of Algeria) that he says he will wear a trainman's cap for a .week if he can't outdo Jens. Sponsor for Each Township Any way, the boys are raring to .go in the Scrap Drive,which Is being launched to get'every bit of olc iron and, scrap metal out of the area of six south Kossuth townships. Algona is taking the responsibility, for helping the farmers gather up their scrap .and members of the service clubs will personally aid Ijx-ihe drive by making a farm to farm canvas. The townships ant sponsors are as follows: Union townsh.'.p "by the^Veterans of Foreig Wars ; with Jens Sorensen', chairman; Cresco, toy the Junior Chamber or specific details as to how the crap can tie handled. The farmer •an take his scrap to a junk deal- »r and sell it for the prevailing rice, BUT HE IS ASKED TO TURN HIS RECEIPT OVER TO THE lOLLECOTNG UNIT IN HIS n! ff tneSfifier ot,"^ ^j , /the army* air corps since" 1939," , joining up in Des Moines, and is an aviation mechanlce. AU combine owner* are requested by the Kossuth' County USDA War Board to attend a meeting at the Court Room. Algona,' Tuesday evening, October's; at 8:00 p. m. The purpose* of the'raceting Is to, discuss ways and means of harvesting the soybean crop most efficiently. The War-ippard is desirous "of ^knowing what th« owwern'have now planned so It will kt»o* *•-*ter. what the harvesting-pro 1 are, apt to be, Every eJTort be made to get the Igoyisan harvest^ in frypfewJWWB^ ELEVEN COMPLETE INSTRUCTORS' FIRST AID COURSE Under the direction of -Herman Arrasmlth, a representative from St. Louis, an instructors' course In Red Cross, first aid was completed here lasfctf&ki; Members of the class, of eleven' who finished .the course' are how certified .Instruci tors and are authorized to conduct classes In junfor, standard and advanced Red Cross first aid In Kossuth county. The new Instructors sinclude .Ralph rElbert,' Harlan Frank!.' Raymond Har. 1 *, Eugene Hutching. Vallo Naudaln, JFrank Russell, Lola Scuff ham, Mrs. Elizabeth Schenqk, Earl Sprague, Ernst Thlel of Algona; and Irene McVlcker of Swea'City. , Lola Scuffhamhasbeen v appointea Kossuth chairman for Accident Prevention for Home and Farm, a branch activity of the Red Cross. Are You Planning on Christmas Mail for The;Boy*in; Service Postmaster Wade Sullivan would stress the importance, of get* Ing Christmas mall for the boys In the armed forces Into the* P<»t office ' r t especially to those serving ov- LS. 'Re urges the very latest w ,wwa«JMf foreign letters and packages to be November let. Flag Tag Day here Saturday, Oct. 3 '••Next Saturday, October 3, will be l^ag Tag.Djty in Algona. Funds raised will be turned over to the;. Civilian Defense '.Council' which .has *een operating without./funds . % at 'a ^distinct disadavantage. Buy a flag for your lapel and help the Defense Council in its necessary war effort .ftian; Riverdale by KIwanls','','BYank -.Ze'nder, chairman; Plum Crej8k"ljy Rotary, Gene.,Murtagh, chairman Irvington, by the United Service Women of America, Mrs. J D. D Monlux,: chairman;, the east half o Reading left to right, Don Cook, Frank Cook. TOWNSHIP FOR CREDIT TO SEE WHICH TOWNSHIP GATHERS THE MOST SCRAP. Or, he can take it to the collecting depot at the corner of State and Philips street on the. Northwestern right of way and donate it. Or astly he can make arrangements with the .collectors to'gather thfi junk aitd haul it away, etther don-, itlrij^it 'or, being.paid for it. Farmers were very busy at the time the first scrap drive was,held In August and many were not able to get their old metals and scrap iron, etc. out of the groves at the time. Now the need for scrap threatens the closing up of melting furnaces where half scrap and half new metal !s needed for onaklhg every plane; tank, gun, etc. After the present drives for scrap are completed say by the middle of October, it will be UNPATRIOTIC FOR ANYONE TO HOLD VITAL SCRAP MATERIAL. Right now there is only a two weeks' reserve supply of scrap. Climax Columbus Day Tlie drive will be climaxed on Monday, •when thi Algeria. The (W:-th the government asking for 17,000,000 tons of scrap iron before the first of the year a decided drive Is being made to gather in the scrap in which all American clt'- zens are taking part Junk dealers all over the country have been urged to put forth every effort to gather and ship this scrap to smelters and Algona dealers have cooperated most excellently in this regard. ' During the month between August 26 and September 26 the Fran-k Cook Scrap Iron and Metal, city, has shipped 18 carloads to the 'east. This means a total of 1,336,000 pounds or C6S tons. This would seem an in- d'cation that Kossuth residents have been active in scrap collection and the county stands 16th from the top in the state with an average of 250.7 pounds per capita. As a result of the activity of the Cook Scrap. Iron and Metal the War Production Board has issued a scrap producer emblem to the firm in recognition of its cooperation.' r 1J2, Columbus Day bli^ro'agBl 5n'=to Chamber of . .. merce is cooperating with the group and will arrange for proper festivities for the occasion with all due honors going to the winning town- "The Greenberg Auto Supply was also issued a l.'ke eiriblem by the War Production Board for the co- American Legion, Ralph Miller, chairman. Ralph Is perhaps on the spot trying to make a whole township but of two halves, but he can be depended on to come through, and so can the townships. Solicitation Starts Oct. 5 Solicitation starts October B, and the groups will visit each farm In the townships- and have farmers sign cards In regard to the scrap they .have and • how they/ wish to dispose of it. Everyone should read the page ad elsewhere ta the paper of scrap. The Algona newspapers join in the drive with continued publicity throughout the drive and are thereby cooperating also in the national newspaper drive to make people realize the dire necessity of getting in the scrap now, before snow flies. •Kossuth now has an average of 250 pounds of scrap metal turned in per cap.'ta. Four other counties have an average of 400 Ibs. per capita. Ours is not good enough. It must be better—and it will be. RED CROSS SEWING has JJC tiw tfefe oompawi to pf combines J|V«ttabfo, * , Another Yjctory EWT Of Com BrQM^ht In by Duck Stamps on Sale At Post Off ice Now The duck, season opens In Kos- suth.Oqtober 10th. :DuoW stamps are on sale at'the post office now and Postmaster Sullivan suggests that hunters' inake their purchases; now in orde rto avoid the usual last minute rush, ,The office bw b.een allocated a number pf stamps and when the are sold several days will elapse before another supply can be received* Because of war regulations stamps wijl not be. sold after the regular closing hours each day. Quarton Says We Must Finally Crush son Oct. 5, las_t y.e.w.and^yjig JOHN SMITH, 70, PASSES AT ALTA ' (LuVerne: Word received "at Lu- Verne announces the death of John Smith, 70, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. L. L. Anderson, at Atta, Iowa, Thursday night. 'Funeral services were held and 'nterment made at Allta Sunday afternoon. Mr. Smith is survived by his wife and daughter, Mrs. Andersoij, two grandchildren, Merlin and JBetty, and five brothers and two sisters, :\ • ,7&»Verne Pioneer"''~; '• < Mr. Smith, was born and raised In the LuVerne neighborhood, his parents coming there in 1858, He farmed south of LuVe/ne up to the first of January last year when he and his wife moved to AUa to make their home with their daughter. Attending the funeral from the LuVerne neighborhood were Mrs, Wm. Ellis, a sister, and i K. Smith of Harding, and.Geo. Smith of Dakota City, brothers. Jenkins in Signal Corps Joseph \A»- Jenkins, Algona, is ft member of a class, of 10 candidates certified' by headquarters of 'the Seventh Service Command for three rnoajhs training as .a junior repa'-r- Red Cross Moves Into Arlo's Grill The Red Cross headquarters have been moved to the main floor of the T. H, Holmes building formerly known as Arlo's Grill, where the women are now working on the 60,000 surgical dressings which are to be made here in the next two months. Mrs. L. G. Baker and Mrs. F. E. Kent are in charge of the work. The group previously work-, ed in the former Metropolitan office. Anyone who is interested and willing to work on the dressings is asked to come to the headquarters. Those who attend are requested to bring a clean wash dress and changi from their street clothes when they arrive. They are also asked to bring somethtog to cover their hair and a hand towel. J. D, Lowe's Request For Active Duty Denied J. D. Lowe received reply Monday from the headquarters of the Seventh Artoy Service Command of the Arroy at Omaha, Nebr., rejest- |ng his application for assignment to active duty in the army, He had held a reserve commiss.'on in the Coast ArtUHery Corps following the last world/ war and was place on the inactive Jist some years ago. He had requested that his name be restored to the active list - that he be assigned tp active Reading from left to right: ChKS.Fommerenlng, Joe Green^erg^ Del r mermnFauk;Be operation extended by that firm. f. T. McCann, representing the Board was in the city Saturday and made the presentation to both firms. DIED SATURDAY Auto Crasl^Oceurred Near Bode dn^SiglitiWiy 160; Car Cdtiidefd With Semi, Trailer Truck Helen Ford, 22, of near West Bend, died at the Kossuth hospital here Saturday forenoon from injuries received in an auto cplIla'iOn Friday morning on Highway 223 north of Bode., It seems that the car Mi which she was riding with her brother, Gene, Ronald Bleuer> of West Bend, and an aunt front Minneapotijf, had stopped alongside the pavement while drivers were bring exchanged and in getting back onto the Highway a collision was had with a semi-trailer truck. Miss Ford to Hospital Of the group !-n the car 'Miss Ford was the only one to be seriously injured. She was rushed, to the Ko9- suth hospital in'Algona but was unable to survive her injuries artel passed away Saturday forenoon. Funeral services were, held .from the Catholic church in "West Bend Monday morning and interment was in the Corpus Christl cemetery at Ft. ' Dodge. . ,4 •, ' Bad Visited Ifert Dodge Miss Ford and her brother had visited the day previous with another sister, Mrs. Harvey Mertz, in. the MeCreery hospital; at Whittemore, where the latter had giver* birth on the 16th to.'a son. Mr. Mertz, in the army, had sailed for overseas duty on the 6th, and Miss. Tord and her sister had planned on the mother and baby mov!.ng in. with their mother, Mrs. J.M, Ford, just south of West Bend. Following this visit the group drove to Fort Dodge and it was on the return Friday that the accident happened. Survived by Mother < ( Deceased is survived by her methi- er, Mrs. J. M. Ford, andiSeveral sisters and brothers. Two years ago another slider, Mrs^Gladys - Sftutte, of Minneapolis, was fatal^**"*-' ed^in an tfuto,accident near - - -"WjB^QKSM^ a^lrimit>e>^&ypara< ajW ' ; .m M \ ' WINTER OUTLINED .„„_. Women Take On Big Job; Hold Three Day Sessions Weekly; Committees Selected Willing workers and nimble fingers will take up the job of sewing for the Red Cross this winter at Legion Hal} when Algona women start on the sewing program which has been outlined. The sewing room is open to the public for sewing each afternoon at 1:30 on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday of the week. Those wishing may get their sewing and do it in the!* homes. Committees Mrs, S. Medin heads the cutting committee made up of Mrs. E. W, Lusby, Mrs. Alma Nelson, Mrs. H. Post, Mrs. C. H. Swanson, Mrs. Ted Larson and Mrs. Gale Towne. This committee meets all day 01 Tuesdays and does the cutting for the workers. The Wednesday sewing committee is made up of Mrs. Ella Padgett, chairman, Mrs. E, Theil, Mrs. a. Patterson and Mrs, Art Schweppe. The Thursday sewing comm'.t- tee Is Miss Irma Davidson, chairman, Mrs, Wm, Barry,, Sr.i Mrs, Stanley Keith and Mrs. Joe Kelly Sr. The Friday committee, Mrs. Wm, Dau, chairman, Mrs. Pearl Pot ter, and Mrs, Arthur Falk, Big Order to Sew ' At the present time the sewing room is turning out sWrts for boy.s, aged 8 to 12. The next project wlM be eewf-ng kits for the soldiers' uti- Application Forms Direct to Truck Owners The Office of, Defense Transportation has sent out notice that all truck owners will receive application forms direct from their Detroit rfFice and that these are ' tp ,'be filled out and returned to the same office,from which the certificates will, be-issued. ,,- . The first information regarding the issuance of these truck certificates was that the. application forms would be obtained through the Mason City office/ The fact still remains that all truck own- ers'are required to have their certificates on or about November September Term of Court Light in Cases peen uctiu a;«M*«w»* v^,/^**— —*—/• i j the boya have Veen ( operating the -^ Ford farm'. C. M. Doxsee and son Here from West Coast O. M. Doxsee and his son, W. H. ' Doxsee, are here from Redwood! City, California, where the-Doxsee- „ family located after leaving Al- l gona 40 years ago. Mr. Doxsee, who is a brother-in-law of Editor f Harvey Ingham of Des Moines, la at the head of a title .and'abstract company. Redwood City Is only a shirt distance from San 'Francisco, and near the ocean and they are; prepared for bombing if it comes. s The Doxsees are here to look after • their farm just west of Algona, and ? will leave Thursday. <2arenqe,Dox-,. , see la one of the finest men- who > have at some time made Algona their home and'toe Is always a wel- w come visitor here among his old, * friends. y - \ ,? & , , Colwell Promoted \ *^of^Septe^t^ «-J oficourt seems to'be very light The pe$it jury was to have set Tuesday of-this week but no cases were ready for trial and the jury was excused for-the week by Judge Stillman. The/jury has beert called for next Tuesday. / Mrs, Hugh Colwell, has been promoted from first ojaas seaman $o third class petty, officer.' He enlisted in October last year. After" receiving basic training at Great Lakes he has been stat'oned at Sari Diego, California. , , September Bieaks AU_ Past Weather Records lity bags, which of a small cloth in which are needle," thread thimble and sundries for repair purposes. 'The sewing roqm will also take up the making pf ladies blouses and boys' overalls, ages 9 100 wW 'be finished. ot which more than The weatherman must have bad a peeve on during this month judging irom the variety of temperature, rain and snow he dished out to us | during the past two weeks. Not' being satisfied with the Ineqnven- i«oces he caused the human 'race lie also broke eight records just to show us that it epuld be done, Even old timers back up on the records for the month. Anew low temperature, an all time low, was estab? lished yesterday, Monday with. 3& It Is tbe lowest record since 188Q. The records for the same period u September since 1907 follow; September }6, September |6, September JJ Eight Records Shattered . Nonchalant)* but .ew^cajy. on, , " training school in Aberdeen, S. P. The class l?e«Bn etudy this week, with Japan's ' he was, HWWW4 Work On Pmfar -Ai ifi?

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