The Saint Paul Globe from Saint Paul, Minnesota on September 8, 1888 · Page 5
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The Saint Paul Globe from Saint Paul, Minnesota · Page 5

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OH, WHAT A GAME! young Mr. Swartzel Gets Amply Even With Long James Duryea. two Games at Dcs Moines, the Hawkeyes Taking Both of Them. Davenport Onion Weeders Take a Thrashing" From Corn Hunkers. No Errors in the Omaha Game —Results of Other Contests. Played. Won. Lost, ccntasre pcs Moines "»3 61 32 * .655 It. Paul . !'.-> HO 35 .« 31 Omaha 94 55 39 .5*5 Kansas City 91 53 39 .571 Milwaukee. 103 48 55 .406 Sioux City 50 20 30 .!" Chicago.. its- 38 60 .3«7 Davenport 93 28 Si .304 NATIONAL LEAGUE. Per- Played. Won. Lost, cennv/e [few York. 104 68 96 .653 Chicago 107 60 47 .560 Boston 106 57 49 .5:17 Detroit 103 •'•"> 48 .533 Philadelphia 101 01 50 .501 Pittsburg 10l 49 52 .485 Washington 104 38 66 .3(15 Indianapolis 103 39 00 .301 AMERICAN ASSOCIATION. Per- Played. Won. Lost, cciitn^e Pt. Louis.. 104 70 34 .670 athletic 103 66 37 .610 Brooklyn 108 154 44 .592 Cincinnati 103 60 43 .582 Baltimore 107 45 62 .433 Cleveland 102 42 GO .410 Louisville 105 38 67 .361 tansasCitv 104 33 71 .311 SUCH a SLAUGHTER. Cyclone Jim Hammered Out of I Shape by the Cowboys. Special to the lobe. , Kansas City, Sept. 7.— Only twentyeight St. Paul men faced Swartzel today in a game that will so on record as the worst St. Paul has ever played. The thirteen errors with which they are credited were mostly inexcusable. Duryea, who has the record of having shut out Kansas City with a single hit, was pounded unmercifully for eighteen bits, With a total of twenty-seven. A curious coincidence lies in the fact that Swartzel Was in the box in the game referred to. fit. Paul should have been shut out, but n the fifth inning Karle hit a grounder to Manning, who let it go by him, letting the runner to first. Then Earle tried to si. 'a! second, and Reynolds, In throwing to catch bun, threw too high to Manning. Ilassamaer, who was backing up second, dropped the ball, and threw to third, but it was a very bad throw. The ball went away by Johnson and Swartzel, and before it could be recovered Earle crossed the ' plate. In the last half of the seventh Morrissey. the second man at bat, fouled a pitched ball, and in trying to catch the tip Reynolds broke the little finger of bis hand exactly as he broke It a few weeks ago at Chicago. lie was replaced byGnnson. When the List hall' of the eighth inning came around, Morrissey wont into the box and Duryea to first. It didn't seem to make much difference about who riitehed, for the Blues pounded the ball I list the same. It was such a one-sided contest thai it was hardly interesting, the only point of interest being as to Whether the visitors would be able to get a hit. Score: KANSAS CITY. AH KIBISBTOA E Long, ss 0 4 3 10 4 0 Manning. 2b.. 6 3 4 113 1 Bradley. 1f.... 6 13 0 0 0 0 treig, if .... 6 110 0 0 0 Johnson. 3b.. li 0 10 0 10 Dan wright, lb 5 2 1 1 12 1 0 Bassamaer.rf. 6 12 0 3 0 1 Rwartzel,p»,. 5 2 2 0 0 12 1 Reynolds, c.;. 4 21 10 8 0 1 Eunnison, c. 10 0 13 0 0 Totals 51 16 18 4 27 21 4 ST. I'M L. All nIBSBPOA X Murphy, ... 4 ' 0 0 0 2 0 I LVrroli'. rf... .3000313 Morrissy, lb.. 3 0 0 0 11 1 1 Pickett." ss... 3 0 0 0 14 0 Earle, If 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 Heillv. 3b 3 10 113 1 Broughton, c 3 o 0 0 4 4 0 Corbet*. 2\>.. . 3 0 0 O 4 4 6 Duryea, p 3 0 0 0 0 6 1 Totals 28 1 0 1 27 23 13 f.insas ritv...i 0 5 2 2 0 0 6 o—l6 St. Prtiil..." 0001000 o—l " ;:ameil runs. Kansas City 5 : two-base bits, Long. Manning Bradley; three-base hits. Manning, Kreig. Johnson; double plays. Umughton and Morrissey 2; first base on balls, off Duryea I : first base on errors, Kanfas City 9. St." Paul 1 ; struck out, by Hwartzel B. bv Duryea 2: passed ball. Broughton ; wild pitches, Duryea 1, luorrhsyl; tune, i:00; ami ire, Cusick. MORTON'S MEN MANGLED. Dcs Moines Does Up Chicago Twice to a Turn. Special to the Globe. •>ks Moines, 10., Sept. 7.— lies Moines blade a good start on the Chicago series this morning, and with Smith in the box won the game with hands down, lie received good support from Trafney and the entire team, not an error beint, made. The visitors were fresh from a Victorious lour at Omaha, and played with a winning gait, but Dcs Moines got in some timely hits, and thus won the game. Dyer was the only man to score for the visitors. His base on halls was followed by a two-base hit by Turner, and a single sent him home. Two hits and an error gave Dcs Moines two runs in the next inning. In the t-i\th a base on balls, a two-base bit and two singles gave Dcs Moines three more runs, and in the eighth a base on balls, a single and a stolen base sent Van Dyke home. The game was called at the end of the eighth inning. The score: I>E> M 'INKS. I AHi KIBSBPOA E llolli.lav. cf... 3 O 0 0 0 0 0 Chafer. .... 3 2 10 2 0 0 Alvord, 3b.... 3 12 0 3 10 licit, lb 4 2 10 110 Mnciillar, ss.. 4 ! 0 2 0 1 1 O Van Dyke, If. 4 1 10 6 0 0 I'hi-lan, 2b..„ 3 0 0 2 10 0 Tnifflev c I 4' o 0 0 10 1 0 fc:,ii:. "p ! 3 0 0 O 0 0 0 Totals 131 0 7 2 24 13 0 """ CHICAGO. ABU IBBBPO a c llanretu ,as 10 0 12 11 Dunes, rf 4 1 1 0 I 0 o Turher.cf 4 0 2 O 0 0 0 11.np1e,2b.... 4 0 2 2 2 11 Jlhcims, 1f... 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 Milton, 3b.... 3 0 0 10 10 Keogau, p.... 2 0 I' 0 1 10 0 Duxdale. c v.. 3 0 0 0 8 3 0 jjcoti, ib ;;j 000800 Totals 30 1 5j 4 24 16 2 Dei Moines 0 0 0 8 o 3 o I—o Chicago 0 0 10 0 0 0 o—l Earned runs, Dcs Moines 5, Chicago 1 : two-base hits, nllar. Turner; three-base hits, Sbafer .Macullar; bases on called balls. Ninth 1, Keogan •_'; struck out, by Smith 7; time, 1:43; umpire, Fessenden. RUBBOra IT IX. In the afternoon game the Maroons could not hit the ball, Milton and Dwyer being the only ones that got safe hits. ]< ,yer also kept the hits scattered until the seventh inning, when a base on balls and five singles netted five runs, and three more were batted out in the ninth. The visitors, with the exception of Ivheims, fielded well. Score: IIKS .-."IMS. ABIIIIIBSBrO A X Hollidav.cf... 5 1 2 0 2 0 0 Kh..fer,'rf. ...4240000 Ma, ullar. ss... 3 2 0 114 1 Alvord, 3b.... 5 12 O 3 2 .0 'Iron, lb 4 O 2 0 10 0 1 Van Dyke. If.. 5 0 0 0 2 0 0 Phelan, 2b.... 5 0 2 0 16 2 Traffley.c 4 2 2 0 8 11 Cushman, p.. . 4-1 10071 Totals 39| 9 15 1 27 20 0 _ ... ■ ■ _______ CHICAGO. KB] KIBSRPO A T. Ilarvahan. ss.. 4 0 0 0 10 3 Keoirnn, rf.... 3.0 0 O 1 0 0 Turner, cf.... 4 0 0 0 2 0 0 Hencle. 2b.... 4 10 2 5 5 0 Llnims. 1f.... 31 0 0 0 110 Milton. ML. ... 401000 0 Dl ,-vit. p 4 0 10 3 3 0 Hoover, c 3 o 0 O - > 5 0 Scott. 2b .... 3 0 o 0 9 9 0 Total 32 li 2 2! 27 12 3 1> > Moines .0 0 1 0 0 O 5 0 3-9 Chicago 0 0 0 OO 0 o o I— l Runs earned, Dcs Moines *: three-base bit, tshafer; two-base hits. sbafer. Alvord, Pbelao ; base on ball*, Cushman 1; struck out, by Cushman 7, by Dwyer 3; time, 1 :40; umpire. Prone nden. " ■- :>-■ DAVENPORT DOWNED. Corn Huskers Calcimine the Onion Weeders. Special to the Globe Sioux City, 10., Sept. 7.— The home team met the "Onion Weeders from Davenport to-day for the first time. The local team has been away for several days a d lost three straight games, and to-day went at it to win victory from the Babies. They won it by not allowing the visitors to make a score and only three base hits. The home team played a very pretty game, and got in their work at every point where It was needed. Score: -nil X COT. a « 111 i; I I iii a E Sneed. it 5 2 3 1 1 0 0 Keccius, 3b... 5 0 2 0 2 0 0 Powell, 1b.... 5 0 1 19 0 0 Broanan. 2b.. 2 10 15 2 0 Veach, If 4 2 2 0 0 o 0 Force, ss 4 10 0 10 0 Genius, cf.... 3 2 12 10 0 Seibel. p 4 0 1 0 0 10 0 Nicholas, c... 4 0 1 0 8 2 0 Totals 30-8 11 5 27J 20; 0 DAVENPORT. ab IS 1 IIIBfO A I E Forster, 1ib.... 3 0 0 0 2 2 0 Fisher, ss 4 0 10 15 0 MeCaulev, lb. 4 0 O 0 8 0 0 Maver, cf.... 4 0 1 O 3 0 0 Pagan, rf 3 0 0 0 10 1 McCnllom.lf .3010200 L.Man. 3b.... 3 0 0 0 0 2 1 Snyder, c 2 0 0| • 0 0 6 0 Stephens, p.. 3 0 01 0 7 O 3 1 Totals 20 0 31 0 24 15 4 Sioux City 1 1 1 O 0 4 l o *— 8 Davenport 0 <» 0 0 1) 0 O 0 o—o Famed runs, Sioux City 2; two-base bus, Powell, Veach; three-base hits, Sneed, Veach ; double plays, Force, Broanan and Powell, Forster, Fisher and MeCaulev; struck oat, by Mel>el 9. by Stephens 4; ba^es on balls, oil Siebel 2, off Stephens 4; passed balls, Nicholas 1. Snyder 2; left on bases, Sioux City 7, Davenport 4; time, 1:45; umpire, Hasan. WITHOUT AN ERROR. Omaha and Milwaukee Put Up a Fine Exhibition. Special to the Globe. 1 Omaha, Neb., Sent. 7.— Omaha and Milwaukee played a beautiful game here this afternoon in the presence of about 1,500 people. Ever player did himself credit, Not an error was made on either side and the contest was about tve cleverest witnessed here this season. It looked up to the seventh Inning as if Milwaukee could not be beaten, but in this inning the Omahas found Griffith and made six of their hits, earning lour runs. Walsh's fielding and McCabe's slick work were the features of the game. The score: OMAHA. A B all B|S X c M A E Rums, If 5 0 2 13 0 0 McGarr, rf.... 3 10 1110 Crooks, 2b.... 3 1113 4 0 Cooney.sa 4 12 2 14 0 O'ConnelL lb. -4 0 1 0 10 2 0 Annis.ef 4 113 3 0 0 Tebean, 3b.... 3 110 2 2 0 Natfle, c 3 110 3 0 0 Kennedy, p.... 4 0 0 0 15 0 Totals 33 ~~0 9 8 27 13 0 MILWAUKEE. AB X 1 P. I 8H 1* (> > E llawes, 1b... 4 1 1 1 15 0 0 McAleer, cf... 3 10 110 0 Lowe.lt 4 1 10 10 0 Strauss, 3b.... 4 2 11 2 2 0 Walsh, as. ... 4 0 0 0 2 8 0 .Musk rev. rf... 4 0 10 10 0 McCabc, 2b.... 4 0 3 <> 2 4 0 Griffith, P 4 0 O O 0 3 O Mills, c 3 0 0 O 3 2 0 Totals 34 5 71 3 27 19 0 Omaha. 0 0 O 1 0 0 4 1 o—o Milwaukee 1020 010 1 o—s Famed runs, Omaha -1, Milwaukee 2; twobase hits, Tebean, Maskrey; home run. Xagle; bases on balls, off Kennedy 1, off Griffith 3; struck out, by Kennedy 3, by Griffith 3; time, 1 :45; umpire. Quest. AT THE ELEVENTH HOUR. Chicago Gives the Beaneaters an Unexpected Drubbing. Chicago, Sept. Chicago won today's game in the last inning and is still In second place. The game was about the most exciting that has ever been seen here. Both teams started to bat in the beginning and both kept up their hitting to the end. Baldwin was wild and Clarkson ineffective. Boston was ahead till the eighth, when Chicago made two runs. Then Boston made three runs, Quinn's home run hit bringing in Johnston and Brown. Finally in the ninth inning Chicago batted out the game. Duffy began with a three-bagger. Anson followed with a double, and Williamson and Burns with a single each, and then Daly made a three-base bit to left field. The features of the game were the field work of Williamson and Pfeffer, and the batting of Quinn and Kyan. The attendance was 5,500. The score: CHICAGO. ABU IRSBPO A X Rvau. cf 0 3 3 0 10 0 Yanllaltren.lf 5 2 2 0 0 0 0 Duffv.rf 5 2 12 0 0 0 Anson, ...51401100 Pfeffer, 2b.... 5 0 117 3 0 Williamson, ss 5 110 17 1 Burns. '3b ..5120051 Baldwin, p.... 5 0 10 0 0 1 Daly, c 4 12 0 7 10 Totals 45 llj~l7 3 1 27 22 3 BOSTON. AB all BIS I " > B Johnston, cf.. 5 3 10 2 0 l Drown, rf.... 5 3 2 10 1 Quinn, 2b.... 5 2 4 0 15 0 i Kellv, c 5 110 3 3 1 Nash, 3b 2 O 2 0 O 3 1 Ray. ss 5 0 10 3 7 0 Wise, If 4 0 10 3 0 1 Morrill, 1b.... 3 0 1 0 14 0 1 Clarksou, p... 5 0 0 0 0 5 1 Totals 39 9 13 1 27 23 7 Chicauo 2 o 10 0 0 2 2 4-11 Boston 3 101 1030— 9 Earned runs, Chicago 6. Boston 7; twobase bits, Rpan 2, Anson; three-base hits, Duffy, Daly. Quinn 2; home runs, Ryan, Johnston, Kelly, Quiun; double plays. Bums to Pfeffer, to Anson; first base on balls, Johnston, Nash 3. Wise, Morrill 2, Daly; first Base on errors, Chicago 2. Boston 2; struck out. Wise, (larkson 3, Baldwin 2; wild pitches, Baldwin 1; time, 2: 15; umpire. Powers. JUMPED OX SULLIVAN. Athletics Take the Starch Out of the Cowboys' Pitcher. Pim.ADEi.vniA, Sept. 7.— The Athletics and Kansas Citys were to have played two games to-day, but rain put a stop to the second game at the end of the second inning, when the score stood 4tol in favor of the visitors. The first game was won by the Athletics, who jumped on Sullivan from the start and 'earned four of their seven runs. The visitors earned a run in the first inning, but after that they were unable to do anything with Seward's pitching. Score : ATHLETIC. AB H 1 H 8 H P O A E Welch, cf. ... 5 2 2 0 3 11 Stover. If 4 0 o 0 4 0 0 Lyons, 3b 5 12 110 0 Larkin. 1b.... 5 0 1 0 10 0 0 Bierbauer. 20. 5 0 2 0 13 1 i.leason. 55.... 4 2 3 10 3 0 Robinson, C... 3 0 0 17 11 Seward, p 4 2 2 0 0 8 0 Footman, rf... 4 0 0 0 10 0 Totals 39 7 12 3 27 It? 3 KANSAS CITY, A B « 1 BJS POl A E McTnmanv, cf 4 1 2 0 3 0 0 Berkley. 'Jb... 4 0 2 0 4 2 O Jionohue, 3b.. 4 0 0 0 2 4 1 Phillips, 1D... 4 0 1 0 11 0 1 Hamilton, rf.. 4 0 10 10 0 rliue.lt 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 Brennan, c... 3 0 10 4 4 0 Ktterday, hs.. 3 0 0 0 2 8 2 Sullivan, p.. . 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 Totals. .33 1 7 0| 27 18 4 Athletics. 2-1 1 O 0 2 0 0 I—7 Kansas City 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o—l Earned runs. Athletics 4, Kansas City 1; two-base hits, Welch, Lyons. Uleasou; threebase hit. Seward; first base on balls. Stovey, Robinson; bit by pitched ball, Brennan; THE SAINT PAUL DAILY GLOBE: SATUEDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 8, FOURTEEN PAGES. first base on errors. Athletics 4; struck out, Phillips, (.'line, Esterday, Sullivan; wild pitches, Seward 1, Sullivan 3; time, 1:30; umpire, Doescher. "■/.;;.. AVON BY HARD HITTING. Louisville Sends the Kentuckians to Grass. Nkw York, Sept. 7.— The Louisville and Brooklyn teams played an interesting game at Washington Park Brooklyn, to-day. The home nine won the game through hard hitting at opportune moments. Foutz pitched in good form, and was well supported. Score: LOUISVILLE. AB II 111 SB CO A E Mack. 2b 4 12 0 3 5 1 Collins, m.... 4 110 3 0 2 Decker, lb ... 4 1 l O 12 0 0 Stratum, rf.... 4 110 3 0 0 Werrick, 3b.. 3 0 O 1 10 0 Cook, If 4 0 0 0 0 O 0 Pinner, ss.. . 4 0 o 0 0 3 1 Vaugbo.c 4 1 0 o 2 1 2 Swing, p 4 O l 0 0 0 0 Totals 32 5 (i 1 21 15 0 BROOKLYN Ali It If P. < I; PO A E Pinckncy, 3h.. 5 0 2 0 12 0 Burns. s> 5 1 10 2 5 1 Kent/. |> 4 0 0 1 1 0 1 O'Brien, If.. 4 2 1110 0 Orr. lb 4 0 1 O 13 2 0 < Brothers, if* 3 10 1 1 ! 0 0 Badford, cf... 3 2 2 1 2 0 1 Clark, c 4 2 2 14 3 0 Burdock, 2b. 4 0 0 0 2 3 0 Totals 30 8 9 5 27 21 3 Louisville 1 0 10 0 2 10 0-5 Brooklyn 0 14 0 2 0 0 *— Earned runs, Louisville 4, Brooklyn (5; two-base hits, Collins, Hooter, Orr. Clark; home runs, Mack, Burns; lirst base on bails, Werrick, Caruthers, Clark, Radford: first base on errors, Louisville 3, Brooklyn 3: struck out. Mack, Werrick, Cook, Towney 2, O'Brien 2, Vaughn, Orr; passed balls, Vaughn 3: time, 1:35; umpire. Goldsmith. HOO.SIKKS HAMMERED. The Giants Continue to Advance Pennant ward. Indianapolis, Jnd., Sept. 7.— nines' muff in the ninth inning lost to-day's game, for Indianapolis. sin-eve pitched magnificently, and was well supported till the ninth. Bassett made the greatest play of the game by a stop In the eighth inning which saved two runs. lie also batted fairly. Attendance, 1.200. Score: - tKIHAKAPOLIS. AB RIBSBPO A E Dines, cf 4 0 0 0 4 0 1 Denny, 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 1 Beery, If 4 0 0 1 2 0 0 Bassett. -_'b.... 4 13 13 5 0 Glasscock, ss. 4 0 O 0 l 3 0 McOeachv, rf, 3 112 10 0 Schoeneck, lb 4 0 2 0 12 0 0 Buckley, c 4 0 10 2 1 0 Shreve, p...... 4 o l 0 0 4 0 Total 35 2 8 *25 15 2 raw TOBK. A It It llt IS B I' o a E Hatfield, as... 4 10 0 0 2 1 Bicbard'n. 2b 4 1 10 4 4 0 Tiernan, rf... 3 1 1 o 1 0 0 Connor, 1b... 3 0 0 0 10 0 1 Whitney, 3b. 4 0 0 0 3 2 0 Slatterv, cf... 3 0 10 2 2 0 O'Rourke, If.. 3010200 Brown, c 3 0 10 4 3 0 Keefe, p 3 0 0 0 15 O Totals 31 3 5 0 27 IS! 2 Indianapolis... o o o 0 0 0 1 1 o—2 New York 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 2—3 *One man out when winning run made. Earned runs. Indianapolis 1, New York 1; two-base hits, Bassett, Richardson, O'Kourkc, Tiernan: double plays, Bassett, Glasscock and Schoeneck; first base on balls, McGeachy, Conner; first base on errors, shrive, Hatfield, Whitney; struck out, Denny, Buckley, Hines, Beery 2; Tiernan, Hatfield; passed balls, Brown 3: Buckley 1; wild pilch. Keefe •1 ; time, 1:50; umpires, Daniels and Valentine. Postponed by (tain. At Philadelphia— l'itsburg. Two games to day. At Detroit— Washington. At Baltimore— St. Louis. Two games today. At Cleveland— Cincinnati. At Philadelphia— Kansas City. (Afternoon game.) (lames To-Day. St. Paul at Kansas city. Davenport at Sioux City. Milwaukee at Omaha. Chicago at Dcs Moines. Boston at Chicago. New York at Indianapolis. Philadelphia at Pittsburg. Washington at Detroit. Cincinnati at Cleveland. Louisville at Brooklyn. St. Louis at Baltimore. Kansas City at Philadelphia. Rural Cannonading. Special to the Globe. - * Owatonna, Minn., Sept. About 300 people witnessed a game of ball this afternoon played on the old fairgrounds between the Blooming Prairie and Owatonna Athletic Jockey nines. The game was played for a fourth and sixth per cent of the gate money. George Reynolds, of Blooming Prairie, was umpire. The game resulted in favor of Blooming Prairie. Score: Blooming Prairie.. 8050 10 6 6 4—30 Owatonna.... 4 2 6 10 9 10 5—28 A' Challenge. A nine composed of journeymen plumbers of Minneapolis would like to play a game of ball with a plumbers' nine from St. Paul to-morrow at either city. A reply addressed to Henry Kaston, IS Fourth street, Minneapolis, will receive prompt attention. . * Claims the Championship. Special to the Globe. Toronto, Out., Sept. 7.— William O'Connor, of this city, to-day claims the title of champion sculler of America. Teemer's representative and partner arrived here last night and announced to O'Connor's backer that Teenier is either unwilling or unable to find the $1,000 stake himself. ~~ ~~ ~~ ~~~ T The Featherweight Battle. The interest in the Needham-Myers match, which takes place at the Washington rink, Minneapolis, Thursday nteht, is very great. There has been little betting so far, but when Alf Kennedy, Myers' backer, arrives he will find plenty of takers, as Needham is in splendid condition and his friends have every confidence of his winning. Scraps of Sport. The "Big and Little Pills," represented respectively by the allopathic and homeopathic physicians, met on the Minneapolis diamond yesterday to try conclusions with the bat. The Big Pills went to bat first and pounded out two unearned runs, through errors, when the storm came on. The game was postponed to Monday. An athletic and boxing entertainment will be given at Clark's boxing academy, 153 East Seventh street, to-night Prof. John H. Clark will second Needham in his tight with Myers. MEYER'S MILLIONS. Disposition of the Vast Estate of the Jersey Croesus. New Brunswick, N. J., Sept. 7.— The will of the late Christopher Meyer was made public to-day. It leaves to his daughter Margaretta $200,000; to his son Howard, for maintenance during life, a sum not to exceed $7,000 per year, and to Howard's daughter the sum of $100,000, with interest until she attains her majority. The balance is divided equally among the children of his brother and sister. The estate schedules between eleven and twelve millions. 0m Engineers Elect Officers. Special to the Globe. Milwaukee, Wis., Sept. The National Association of Stationary Engineers at to-day's session elected the following officers for the ensuing year: President, R. O. Smith, of New York; vice president. Joseph Feherendotch, Cincinnati; secretary, John Moore, Minneapolis; treasurer, William H. Crownley, Jersey City, N.J.: conductor, S. L. F. Edge, Atlanta; doorkeeper. Joseph Bailey, Omaha. Detroit was selected as the place for holding the next convention. Fruit and Corn Damaged. Special to the Globe. Waterloo, la., Sept. 7.— A violent storm prevailed in this section for a few minutes this evening. Fruit was somewhat damaged, but the ereastest injury was to corn. ON TRACKS FAR APART Fleet Trotters and Pacers Contest for Purses Worth Winning . Bosque Bonita and Abbie Do Some Record Breaking-. iafi Nonpareil Dempsey Gives Big: Bully Jake Kilrain the ; J Laugh. Cycling at Buffalo-Federal Sharpshooters at Fort Niagara. ; Paris, Ky„ Sept. 7.— Bosque Bonita beat the world's three year-old halfmile track record a quarter of a second at the Paris fair yesterday, trotting the fourth heat in the 2;30 class purse in 2:2 i> 1 4 and winning the race, she having previously captured the first two heats in 2:33^ and 2 ;:*)>£. The performance was all the more remarkable When the fact is taken into consideration that she defeated ■ field of older horses. Abbie Q also made a sensational performance in the Paris stakes, she winning the last two heats and race in2:3o»^ and 2::;r,'_,, which is the best average two heats ever made by a twoyear-old over a half mile track. Bosque Bonita is a bay filly by Mackey's Hambletonian, dam by Legal Tender, while Abbie Q is a gray filly by Aberdeen, dam by Pcarine. ON THE NUTMEG COURSE. Roy Wilkes, Captain and Gossip, Jr., Take the Honors at Charter Oak. Hartford, Conn., Sept. The weather was warmer than yesterday at Charter Oak Park, and at 11 o'clock, the hour set for starting the unfinished 2:30 pacing race. Summary: Insurance guarantee stake for 2:20 pacers, value 54.800— Roy Wilkes 4 111 Emma 1 11 10 9 El Monarch 2 2 0 3 Lady Wilkin 3 3 8 2 Allen Ward 8 4 '_' 5 Balsora Wilkes 6 8 3 10 Doctor M 0 6 5 0 Harry Wilkes 7 10 7 4 Bessemer 11 7 4 8 Johnny Woods \ 9 5 11 7 Joe Jefferson 10 9. 9 11 Harry dis. V • Time 2: It; I':!, 2:15*4, 2:l7Ua, 2:17. 2;2f class, trotters : • • Captain 6 3 3 112 1 Company 5 2 12 2 12 Wm Kearney ....1 12 4 5 3 3 Frank Buford 2 6 5 3 4 ro Jeremiah 3 5 6 dr Charlie Gibson 4 4. 4 5 3 ro Time. 2:211*, 2:2oti, 2:21. 2:21 Ml, 2:22t4, 2:24%, 2:29. Free to all pacers Gossip, Jr 2 4 111 Jewett 1 2 2 3 3 Arrow 1..:... .3 14 2 2 JoeL 4 3 3 4 4 L.C.Lee 5 5 dis Time, 2:15%, 2:15, 2:17%, 2:15*4. 2:17%. It was after (i o'clock when the last event of the meeting, the 2:29 trotters, was called. The first heat was won by Eph and the second by Oracle B, when the race was postponed to 10 o'clock tomorrow morning. Best time, 2:22%. This has been one of the most successful meetings in the history of the association. . - MARRED BY WET WEATHER. Last Day of tho Fall Meeting of the Detroit Driving Club. Special to the Globe. Detroit, Sept. 7.— Owing to in- i clement weather and a heavy track the j last day of the fall meeting of the Detroit Driving club was not as much of a j success as had been hoped . The races i came off on time, however, the small : attendance being the most marked result of the disadvantages. Following is a summary: J. L. Hudson stake, two-year olds: Home Rule 2 2 1 Dora Cossack 1 2 4 Braudoliue 5 3 2 Astoria 4 4 3 Master 3 sdis Asnwood 7 dis Time, 2:39, 2:40%, 2:87%. Second race, 2:23 class, $I,ooo— Fugue 3 111 Flush 1 4 2 3 Nellie V 5 2 5 2 Clipper 6 3 4 4 Alrov 7 6 3 5 Emma E 4 7 0 6 Lynn \V 2 5 dr Time 2:23t5, 2:231:;. 2:23, 2:22V2. The National Association ot" Trotting Horse Breeders' stakes for six-year-olds, valued at 8140, and the National Trotting Sire stakes for three-year-olds, valued M 51, 175, were awarded to Williams and Mambrino Dudley, respectively, without a contest • Trotting; at Indianapolis. Indianapolis, Ind., Sept. The Indiana trotting and pacing races closed to-day with three contest^, Grace Lee winning the first for trotting foals of 1885 from William Lindsay and Keller Thomas in order named. Time, 2:999£, 2:39)1, 2:35%. Critmorc won in the 2:30 pacing class, defeating Flora W, Helen Cougar and Vanensley. Time, 2:80K, 231. 2:31%, 2:31. Luella won the race of pacing loals from Roadmaster. It was a walkover. Trotting at Anoka. Special to the Globe. Anoka, Minn., Sept. Two excellent races were trotted at the county fair this afternoon. The 2:50 class was won by Stinson's bay Tom, with Stetson's Big Logan second. Gove's David third. Woodward's Dick Turpln fourth. The special race between Dunsmoe's Gleuwood and Ives' Eclipse was hotly contested, both horses being pretty evenly matched. Gleuwood took first money. . Sheepshead Entries* Special to the Globe. NEW York. Sept. 6.— Following are the entries for Saturday's races at Sheepsheadbay: First race, hnnkicap - sweepstakes, one mile— Egmont, 123: Climax. 117: Niagara, 115; Urisi'tte. 114; Bordelaise, 115: Pasha, log; I.eoH, 107; Amalgam. 107; Kaloolah, 106; swift, 105; Bess, 104; Little Minnie, 103: Volunteer, 97; Benediction, 96; jack Cocks. 93. i -..-. Second race, Flatbnsh stakes, seven-eighths of a mile— Carroll, late Juauita colt, 115; Chump Charley, 115; Fresno. 115; Heron, 115; calieute, 110; Eric, 110; Madstone, 110; Philander, 100; Salvator, 100; tiypsey Queen, 110. Third race, Reapers' stakes, one and threesixteenths miles— Santolene, 114; Her Ladyship, 99; Prose, 99; Hypocrite. 119; Cruiser, 117: Loos; Branch, 117; Little Jim, 112; Kaleidoscope. 112: Judge Murray. 126. Fourth rflce. New York handicap, one and one-half miles— Terra Cotta, 120; Exile, 123; Eurus. 117: Kaloolah, 117; Lclex. 106: Rupert, 105: Fog Womngton, 105 ; Hyprcrite, li l : Pee Weep, 100; Bohemian. 95. < ; Fifth race, handicap, one mile and threesixteenths of a mile— Little Minute. 119; Brown Duke,ll3; Housatona,loS: Los Angeles,lo9: I'niipie.lOO: Pee Weep, 100; Joseph,' 97; lollus Don, 97: Gallatin. 95. , - 1 1 ; Sixth race, handicap, one mile and onefourth of a mile— Eurus, 140; Rupert, 132: Cambysna. 133; Aureus. 123; Los Angeles, 125; truest, 125: ( onnemara, 125: Long Branch, 125; Thetia, 125; Aretino, 127; Tennyson, 120: Ten Book'er, 123; Lologas, 123; Little Jim, 120; Longitude. 120; Littrell.ll*. -■■-■: WASHIXQTOX I'AKK RACES. ; ;•'; ■• Special to the Clone. Chicago. Sept. Following are the entries and weights for the opening day of the fall meeting at Washington Park: First race, one mile— Pink. Cottage, 115; Jim Miilibolliiiid. 101; Lapland, 103; Ed Hack, 108; Aristi, 10S. Second race, three-quarters of a mile- Moonstone, 1< 0: unfv Hamphill, 104; Banbov. 105: J. B. Hardin, 115; CoL Hunt. 105. third race, Glcndale handicap, one and one-quarter miles— Dwyer, 9S; Polein, 116; Comedy, 103; Wooderaf. K'4. Fourth race, selling, seven-eights of a mile — Renounce, 105; Mlrih, 97; Cupid, 106; Doubt. 106: Bonnie King, 07; Ilhodv Prln«le. 107; Faustic, 104: Firmest Race. loo; Glendiiia. 107; birthday. 110; Malaria. 110. Fifth race, five-eighths of a mile— sioriing, 115; Blessing, 112; Montana. H5; Longbide, 108; Cascade, 112; Gladiator, 115} Zoolite, 112; Cherry Blossom, 112; Gentility, 1i .5; Gladstone, 103; Mrs. McAllister, 105. ' - ' '-%'S?* DEMPSEY IS GAME. The Nonpareil Makes Jake Kilrain Back Down. New York, Sept. Jake Kilrain called on Jack Dempsey at the latter's saloon on Front street yesterday, and almost as soon as the pugilists met hot words ensued over Mitchell, the English lighter. Kilrain repeatedly asserted that Mitchell was a better man than Dempsey. ' This nettled the Nonpareil," and he asked Kilrain If he would make a match. He replied that he was not authorized to do so, but he was willing to bet $100 that Mitchell would make a match. Dempsey at once wrote a check for a like amount, but after a good deal of talk on both sides nothing but a silk hat was bet that there would and would not be a match. Dempsey told Kilrain that he feared no man, and would light the heavy-weight to prove it. BOYS IX BLUE. They Make Numerous Bull's Eyes at the Army Competition. Special to the Globe. Fort Niagara, N. V.. Sept. 7.— The army competition preliminary practice commenced here this morning. The following are the competitors, with their aggregate scores at 200, 300, 500 and WW yards to-day: Missouri Division— Lieut. Garrard, 163; Lieut. Day, 106; Lieut. Stewart, 102; Sergt. King, 179; Sergt. Palmer, 161 ; Farrier Hughes, 102; Lient. Macomb, 158. Atlantic Division— Hall, 103; Corp. Hamburg, 166; Corp. Nihill, 157. Pacific V Division— Sergt. Leal, 167; Sergt. Miller, 149; Corp. Doll, 148; Private Foley, 152: Lieut. Ilolley, 153. Practice will continue to-morrow, and the competing shoot will begin on Monday. ARCTIC GALES. It Blew Great Guns and Small Arms Aug. 3, When Many Whalers Were Wrecked. Special to the Globe. San Francisco, Sept. The seamen rescued by the United States revenue cutter Bear from the wrecked whaler in the Behring sea on Aug. 8, describe the storm as something teriflic. The vessels were anchored between Cape Smith and Point Barrow on that day waiting for the breaking up of the ice so that they could sta»t on a whale hunt. During the afternoon it began to blow from the southwest. All of the vessels, with one •„ exceptiou, immediately set ! sail for the northeast side of the point, some of them anchoring between the shore ana a ba located on the east side of Port Moore. On the bar the water is only two or three fathoms deep. The wind increased in violence and swung around to the north, making a heavy sea which broke on the bar. The first vessel to part her cables was the schooner Jane Grey. She struck an iceberg, which knocked a hole in her. She sank shortly afterward. When the storm had subsided several efforts were made to raise the vessel, but without success. The Bear lay at anchor with the other vessels and escaped unharmed. She supplied the vessels with all her spare anchors and chains and rendered all the assistance possible. The shipwrecked sailors were transferred at once to the Bear, and she, being short of provisions, Started at once for San Francisco. All of the rescued sailors speak in the highest terms of Capt. Ilealy. of the Bear. The, three barks which were lost belong in New Bedford. The Young Phoenix ai d Mary Anderson were owned by J. P. Bartlett & Sons, of that place, and were valued at $30,000 and $2">,000 respectively. The Fleet Wing was owned by J. & W. Wing, of New Bedford, and valued at $30,000/ The schooner Jane Gray was owned by Wright, Brown & Co., of this city, and the Ino by S. 11. Frank & Co. They were valued at $20,000 each. THEY GRIEVE AT PIERRE!. Gifford Had Thrown Them Snaps, and They Wanted Some More. Special to the Globe. Pierre, Dak., Sept. 7.— The delegation that returned from the Watertown convent. this week were not in exactly that angelic frame of mind that would conduce to perfect peace and blessedness. Having gone thither to triumph in the laurels of the man trom Canton, it was surely a sore disappointment to know that their labor and enthusiasm In his behalf had been utterly in vain. Many a growl and scarcely audibly uttered Imprecation is heard when the matter is referred to. but this is best illustrated by the words of the more than illustrious Col. Billiard, one of the main pillars of the g. o. p. of Pierre and this section, who, when the news ot the nomination of Matthews was lirst carried to him, very aptly represented his and party's feeling hereaway over the situation by RELATING A YARN which is one of the colonel's peculiarities in such trying situations. Said the colonel: "I remember one morning, as the train was pulling out from the depot, a man and woman, each carrying grips, were coming down the hill on the rnn. Turning in on the track, they made a last desperate effort to overtake the train that was fast leaving them behind, until, finally exhausted, they stopped and the man exclaimed, 'Damn the train, anyhow!' Turning to him. the woman said: 'Thank you, sir, for so fitly expressing my sentiments.' I wish," the colonel added, "that I had that man here now to express my sentiments." Gilford has always gone out of his way to DO PIERRE A FAVOR. and she has looked to him in case be went back for another term to do many odd jobs that would redound to her advantage in the future, but this pie is all dough for the present ; and while Mathews, perhaps, is all right in their sight, and they will support him as best they can, the Republicans of Hughes county still in silence shed a tear over the fate that befell Gifford at Watertown. and feel as though they had lost a friend, if not a father. NIPPED BY JACK FROST. Great Damage Done to the Wheat and Tobacco Crops in Connecticut. Special to the Globe. j Gheat Bakiuxgtox, Mass., Sept 7.— ltcports from Monterey, in the eastern part of Berkshire county, r eport all j wheat and tobacco crops in that section destroyed by last night's frost. Sjecinl to the Globe.. : j Danbury, Conn., Sept. 7.— Reports from various parts of the state show widespread damage by last night's frost 'to corn and tobacco. 'The damage to the tobacco crop in the Connecticut valley, which was of unusual promise, is estimated at thousands of dollars. 01 j, i Lumbago. J^f CHRONIC GASES ■ m. YEARS STANDING. Ify NO RETURN OF PAIN. I "i$M At DrngcUni and Dultri. f^** THE CHARLES A. VOGELER CO. fj£\w. Baltimore. Md. *: CTW R.EJ A.DTT. The SEASON for October. Lapiks' Illustrated Magazine. The Oc'i'cr part contains: A He; lew of "Novelties" and "Xew Pane? Work," Richly Illustrated: 3 Colored : Plates: 'JNaibnul Costume Pictures: 167 Illustrations cC Press and Needlework : 21 Flat Paper Patterns; 18 Embroidery De- I signs and Initial Letters. . Tor Sale by ail Newsdealers. Price, 30 cents. I 1 1 4k i 1 i " I BHBfii" |B £a a g aIS! ihiHiH The Mammoth. Wholesale and Retail Dry Goods House of W^^m 213-215, Nicollet hi, Minneapolis, £7^7 'B 1 1 -4S'(iiflfi| m Now are showing- the largest siosk in their twenty-five *i^ R M sltlr^» lt?f S mam retail departments ever placed under roof in the great 4fjA S^i^S^sSfeß Northwest. Our facilities for cash purchases are unsur- SBv fjl &' 4 '■'?' PtratS passed. Owning- and controlling* all our great departments, U| Ml ffillMi^^^Sffl covering" four great floors, we have obvious advantages whf 'c.U.i over those alleged dealers who have only one or two and mf %i « a*. jfib. a ■ & 9Ar% sub-let the rest. Our expenses are at the minimum. The S lira O o\~Ml liv V profits belong- to one man. No partners, department owners, w\ IT ITH I IiaJ n0 P arent concerns to divide with. ©213.215 -Nicollet OUR WHOLESALE DEPARTMENT IVVIIiriEAPOXaIw lls replete with many remarkable bargains, which should * • I j enlist the attention of the close-buying- retail merchants. Every visitor to the city cordially invited to call. No one will be importuned to buy. S. E. OLSON & 00. SILKS, SATINS, PLUSHES AND VELVETS! Fair week only comes once a year. We intend giving all callers a picnic in this department: Note the following: Faille Francaise, in all colors, 22 inches wide; these goods warranted all silk. Regular $1.35 goods. For Fair week si per yard. 22-inch Black Gros Grain Silk, warranted to wear. Regular $1.35 goods. For Fair week $1 per yard. Satin IMiadames in all the new fall shades, 21 inches wide, soft finish. Regular $1.15 goods. For Fair Week 85e per yard. Corduroys in Cream, Navy, Wlne.Seal, Grays, Fawns, Myrtle and Browns, 27 inches wide. Regular $1.15 goods. For Fair Week 70c per yard. Novelties in Silk: Velvets, two tones in black, brown, blue, green, wine and fawn, for combinations and wraps. Regular $1.50 goods. For Fair Week 75c per yard. Dress Plushes in all shades, 16 Inches %ide. Regular $1 goods. For Fair Week 55c per yard. 18 inches wide; regular $1.25 goods. For Fair Week 75c per yard. 19 inches wide; regular $1.50 goods. For Fair Week $1 per yard. 24 inches wide; regular $1.75 goods. For Fair Week $1.25 per yard. This department is now complete, with a full line of Novelties and Dress Silks, in plain and evening shades. We call your special attention to our new display of Silk Novelties for Combinations, both with silk and woolen goods, at the lowest prices. DRESS GOODS impossible to tell you what we have in store for you. We shall give a few of the many bargains offered for the coming week in Domestic Goods only: 2 eases double-fold Mattelasse Suitings, iv solid colorings, new tall shades; elegant 10c quality; this week price 7JiC per yard. -.:- -^ S cases 3G-inch English Cashmere in all the fall shades; 22c goods; Fair Week 16c per yard. 100 pieces 38-inch Cloth Suitings, elegant mixtures, also gray and browns, extra heavy; 37Kc quality; Fair Week 25e per yard. 250 pieces 38-inch fine quality Dress Flannel, in gray and brown mixtures; just the thing for traveling suits; elegant 50c goods; Fair Week 31c per yard. '■'■■■':. ■ , .V 300 pieces inch all-wool Cashmere Flannel, in very desirable colors; 05c goods; Fair Week s<>c per yard. • 400 pieces 54-inch best quality Ladies' Cloth, heavy and fine goods, solid and mixed shades; 85c goods; Fair Week price 62)£c per yard. 100 pieces 54-inch Brown Cloth, a gem. all the newest fall shades; very line; extra heavy; $1.25 goods; Fair Week BUc per yard. IMPORTED DRESS GOODS. Our line of French and German Dress Goods cannot be matched outside of New York mrrkets. Every conceivable weave, style and color, both in plain and high novelties. As for prices, we giarantee to be the lowest. We na.e prices for the Twin Cities. Others try to follow. BLACK GOODS The largest stock west of Chicago; all the new and choice fabrics. Make a call and convince yourself, or send for samples. $3^Those who find it inconvenient to visit us in person should order their goods through our well-known Mail Order Department. We guarantee satisfaction. Send for Samples. ':-■ v : %:■. '$■ -\ s. el ox^sojst c&,co. B^utf*^ ■a&BEQEtiri O BuDBSZffl IrabnCCri^ PlP '" • 213-215 NICOLLET AY. CLOAKandSUIT PARLOR. We are now showing the largest and most complete assortments of Cloaks to be found in the Northwest. We have over 100 Plush Cloaks in stock to-day, all new and good. None left over from last year. We do not carry anything but the Pure Seal Plush. Every garment is perfectly cut and fits to perfection, and all have extra gocd qualities, of linings in them. ■HJI Oui^U.U/ 1 Plush Sasques and splendid quality of Seal Plush, extra good lining, full cuffs, four sealskin loops and chamois pockets. Our Plush Sacques at $22.50 and $25 are made from a very fine and good quality of plush and hair; extra good trimmings. * We show 37 styles of Plush Sacques and Newmarkets, ranging in price from $19.97 to $75. We are showing extra good Plush Newmarkets at $34.87 and still better ones at $38.50; finer one at $40, $43.87 and $45. We are showing nearly 150 styles of Cloth Newmarkets in stripes and plain colors. Starting with a fine striped Cloth Newmarket, with puff back, bell sleeves, fancy cuffs, at $5.98, better ones at $7.35 and very good ones at $8.50, we have a great variety at $10 in the new colors, both plain and striped. A few cloth, full cape, nicely braided, at $11.38. Handsome Plain Beavers in all colors, handsomely embroidered, at $14.50. Heavy cloth, striped, with angle sleeve, satin-faced, for only $17.87. *,;\U>, We have Fancy Newmarkets in all grades, from $14.50 to $138.50. Any desirable style of Cloak we have, and all will be sold at the very lowest' prices. In Children's Garments we have an immense stock, starting at $1.50 for a good Plaid Cloak, and a fine Wool Plaid . Skirt, belt and clasp, for only $2.75, and from that up to $30. Our stock of Shawls surpasses anything in the Northwest. Starting at $1.38 for a good plain all-wool Shawl; $1.98 for a good Beaver Shawl; $3.50 for a good allwool Double Shawl; $4.87 for an extra fine, large, heavy, all-wool Double Shawl; a very fine Velvet Shawl at $3, $3.50, $3.87, $5, $5.98, $8.50, $9.68 and $10. ?:v : We have an elegant line of Ladies' Cloth Suits. Starting at $6.50 for a good colored Cassimere Suit; $7.50 for a good Flannel Suit; a few Flannel suits at $8.98; a handsome all-wool, braided Tricot Suit for $10; a handsome tailor-made, braided Suit for $12.50, and from that up to $38. 5 UPHOLSTERY, BLANKETS AND COMFORTS. Bed-hot bargains. First pome first served. Prices made this week that are corkers. 75 pairs extra fine quality Lace Curtains, 3 yards long-, regular §1.50 goods. For fair week, 93c per pr. 10 pieces 51-in. fancy Ik, cross stripe; new and very desirable goods for long curtains; regular §1.50 goods. For fair week, §1 per yd. 25 pairs extra heavy Chenille Portieres; regular §10 goods. For fair week, $7.50 per pr. 20,000 Opaque Shades, all colors, mounted on a good spring roller, size 3x6; regular 75c goods. For fair week, 4.2 c each. Extra Heavy 10-4 White Blankets; regular §1.25 goods. For fair week, 75c per pr. The Finest Line of White and Colored Australian All- Wool Blankets ever shown. 10 Bales Print Comforts, full size, gray wool filling; regular §1.25 goods. For fair week, 75c each. Better grades of Cretonne and Satteen Comforts, full size, extra fine quality, at prices ranging from §1.50 to §3 each. CARPET DEPARTMENT. Gigantic Stock, covering one entire floor 150 by 50 feet A Perfect Marvel., Styles and Prices Unmatchab/e. Inspect before buying. Great bargains in Carpets for the coming week. - Those visiting the city for pleasure and profit are cordially invited to inspect our large and elegant stock. All carpets sold costing over 50c per yard made and laid free of charge. Union C. C. Carpets at 50c per yard. Cotton Chain Extra Super Carpets at 60c per yard. A Wool Extra Super Carpets at 65c per yard. Tapestry Brussels Carpet at 60c per yard. Body Brussels Carpet at §1 per yard. Wilton Velvet Carpet at §1.25 per yard. Royal Wiltons, new designs and shades, at §1.50 per yard. Extra Fine Moquctts at §1.65 per yard. A Fine Smyrna Rug, 26x54 inches, only §1.50 per yard. Linoleum and Oil Cloths, in all colors and designs, at lowest prices. Bargains in Basement Bazaar Only six months old and we are doing the business of the city. We make the prices. Hence our success. Handsome Decorated Chamber Sets in new patterns, high colors; 10 pieces; regular §5 goods. For Fair week §2.68 per set. White Stone China Cups and Saucers, with handles; regular 60c goods. For Fair Week 30c per set. White Stone China Cups and Saucers, without handles; regular 50c goods. For fair week, 25c per set. Crystal Glass Water Sets, fancy patterns; regular §1 goods. For fair week, 75c per set. Fifty-pound Flour Cans, handsomely decorated; worth §1.50 each. For fair week, §1 each. Three-quart Nickel Teapots; regular 25c goods. For fair week, 17c each. i> Kirk's Laundry Soaps: Admiral, 10 bars for 25c; Imperial, 8 bars for 25c; Savon, 6 bars for 25c.

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