The San Francisco Call from San Francisco, California on February 14, 1899 · Page 8
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The San Francisco Call from San Francisco, California · Page 8

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Tuesday, February 14, 1899
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8 BICYCLE RIDERS START ON THEIR LONG SIX-DAY GRIND Score of Men of Various Na= tionalities Commence the Won= derful Test of Endurance. Pierce, Chapman and Barnaby y Lead by One Lap. at End of Ihe First Hour. The six-day bicycle race is on.. Forthe .remainder of this week a score -c.f riders will pedal night and day In a contest Which will try the stoutest -.-arts and demonstrate the remarkable strain that • 'hi- man. being can. withstand. ■'"., •....'.•'; '-.' Eighteen' men were lined upon the Pavilion track and were started by Paul M. '■■ Nlpp'ert;,. president California: Associated Cycling: Clubs, shortlS* before 11 o'clock. They commenced their journey, which is . expected to" reach a total of .over _o*;iO miles. ; at. a .'fast clip. : varicolored costumes , •of the; great bunch of riders : presented a striking picture as th.- m-n circled about? • the' - steeply banked track. 7 They? were soon. spun. put in a long, waving line like the tail of a huge kite. • : Miller was the/first man. to shake; up the. crowd and. start them sprinting-;. -He opened up a. small gap which he gradually .increased . to half a lap before his oppo-. rie'rits .' a woke*, to '"-, the: necessity "' ■ going after aim. . Some of the bunch helped, one: • another and went out after the flying j /'leader, whom, they gradually. overhauled.;! Chapman then went after a lap and gain- ; . ed:it.. He is not looked upon as a stayer, I so the big men paid no heed to him. ,-'- . 7 •• --Frarik" Waller, carrying, the emblem" and., the. hopes of the Acme Club -.WllCfilrtieni j is easily the favorite of the crowd. A. crowd of Acme rooters headed by Lou. ?Hardie, the rubberneck. clim digger, were present to cheer Waller o*i his war, Hardie had composed a number. 01 <yells for theleather-Uir.ce 1 athletes *r->in across; the bay. -Their favorite, cry was; .'. Now. .7 ';■ - ; ' "'■■•? '. -Y-y -':'■■ •■'.'■ :' . ■::■;:■'. ■'• 7 ,■'-■■ '"■ "Waller! Waller! Waller! : ■ ; Hi. Up! Hah!:-: V:'.-:/: ■: '.>*■'":•'. ••"''.. Y.y / . Zip! Boom' AH! - Acme Wheelmen of Oakland! Waller had a: discouraging experience;: at the start: Before he ; had .ridden., a ; lap his -addle came, loose -'under, him and he was compelled .to dismount.- . " Before, he could" get going he had lost two laps.: ■ As the accident: was not brought about by himself? he was allowed .the. lost '.laps and thus started - level, with: his. field. : - An army of ' men will. .be. required' to . handle the race. Each rider, has three . or more -assistants- who prepare his food I and in. the closing hours' of the race keep ■ him on the track. In addition to. these -there are two scorers- for every .rider:. They relieve.; each,. other at intervals for food and sleep, . y , Before the race the men made their . preparations quietly. -.-'■ Machines were :• overhauled and food made ready. . This ■■;. will consist: chiefly of liquids, the. favorite. • sustalner being koumis, a Russian drink.". ■ They will also consume large Quantities of, fruit and of the: salads chicken. is first Choice. ■•' :'?'*..•>" ■'-••'"'" y-y:"'- '"'.-. '-.".:. '■/-.'■':/■':/ "- The big men in the rare will get HO , Bleep. during the first twenty-four hours, and during the. six days will secure be- : tween nine and ten hours'" rest. -7 ? .'->7 ■'""- The attendance •.last. .'■ night: '-'. was 7 the largest of the season. It was made up chiefly of ladies; whose brlghtgowns lent ; color to the grim Interior of ..Mechanics'! Pavilion. Preceding .the long race a num- ': ber of short distance contests: -were- run : off. The pick. of tliebunch was the fivemila match ' between ' Floyd ..MeFarland 7 and . Teddy Goodman. The latter was paced by . Fournier and -.: his. ;■ petrdleum-driV-h machine^ while the . tall California-" had a., quartet- of speedy tandem teams. The latter man won handily , his tithe.-" for the? five .: miles being 10 06. • ' Harry Elkes rode a mile in 1:50— moving on a small Indoor track. The score at the end of. the first hour 7 Was: ... follows: . y,, "'•• ;//■/■:; ///-■■ :'.•.?.";■; •Ojmm : -",. ...... ■„ ... ;■ ■■-,.,.- ,:-.„„,... .22 miles * laps "A.. Iter. .■-. ... ... ■■-„ ..» - ..».,-,-. ■:...- .... mile. 4 laps Pierre. „.-,,„..,;.„,.„, „22.m iles .'. laps " Alberts „,, ,i, .„„,-,..,-,.= ,22 miles 3 laps 1-a.wsoir i .»;.-„ „,;.,„.•,..,-,..„ .v:., 22 -tallies 4 laps Kasii .„■.„,'.;,»■, -„., „,,.,.,;»,,»,.: .2 miles 4 laps- Miller- „,.„,„,,„.....„-„., .:,;.^ = .22 miles 4 laps Aronson , „- -...,.,,,. , 1= :, „.22- miles 4 lap's Hale ; , , , , „ -...- ........22 miles 3' laps Julius .. ;'.:,, ... '„ .,..»-. 22 miles 4 laps " Frederick ■'. .<"..'. ....'. ... •?...-.-.-: . ... ..>.': '. ': .22 miles 4 laps." TurVlhe ...,:,-,, „. „- .»-.- ,,, „ : 22 miles 4 laps . Stevens' ...:. ..-. .-. . .2 miles 4 laps ■ Chapman... ...: . . . .....- .. . ;' . ... ..-:;.; ; ,722 m lies 3 .laps Barnaby : 7 , „,, ,„..,„.„ .22 miles ■"- laps : HastsA^t y: -.:,- „:.-.-i .... ._ miles, Asr-'v-icsr . ... 22 miles: 4 laps Pflklrigton. ...,...: „.».;„,.,,.„ .22 miles 3 laps .'• Coming. down to details, the event of the : evening , in- the -short- events was a •-fivemile paced match race between Floyd .A.- MeFarland --f "San/Jose and Teddy- Good-" '■ man o.'.i '■• -N.tw York McFarland'a pacers . were Coulter .7 arid Stevens, Lacey and Lawson.. Birdsall and Theiseh; Goodman had -Wells 'and Champion Kikes, Cotter and Downing. • and Founder's ''infernal machine."" Everything went well until the third lap. when MeFarland gained a lap on his opponent, caused by Fournier setting, too hot a clip for Goodman; . resulting, In. the" latter dosing bis pacemakers for several-laps. At this stage the race was wdldly exciting, and continued so for a dozen. more laps. MeFarland continued to gain-gradually for the next two miles. The first mile was ridden in 2:' l-",', ' and two .-miles in 2;50 2-5. MqFarland gairied another lap on the fourth mile; t,ut Goodman kept it up gamely to the finish. Me-- Farland sprinted the last lap and -won by' two laps and several lengths. The : third mile " was: ridden .in 2:08: total - time 6:04 1-5; four miles In 8:03 1-5, arid the five miles In 10:06 2-5. : . " '""' c : The race was one of the best ever -seen on a California track, and both riders were liberally yapolauded.; The multipacing, was ; a novelty to San Francisco race-goers, and every one .was- Id. lighted: I with the novelty. ..-..---; .The one mile- open, professional, was I run in three heats and a final. The winners of the three heats were Jay Eaton: i of New Jersey. Hardy of San Jose, and Orlando L; Stevens of towa • \V- G. Furman. of Los Angeles arid Teddy Goodman of -^w York were: seconds in I .the two fastest heats, arid qualified With • the. winners for the. final. Downing took the pace at the start. Steven, gofng' up on. the second lap. Eaton took the. third? • Goodman... the-, fourth and ..Furmftri the j fifth. Stevens then started an early THE CALL BICYCLE CHART. Mechanics' Pavilion, Mondau Evening, February 13---1899. Third Evening of the Winter Season - •• .*' of Bicycle Racing. sprint, nearly -leaving Eaton, asleep. : The "indoor king:' would not have it that way, however and was soon after the leaders. Getting himself in front. Eaton had only Stevens to deal with, and after securing the pole on the last lap had the race well In hand, though "Stevie" gave him a hot brush to the tape, landing second. Downing was. third, Furrnan fourth. • The time was 2:16 3-5. ./. '•'" - • • . - . ■■'■' 7 The winners of the heats of the halfmile handicap, amateur, Were Walter J. Davidsbri of . the. Bay City : Wheelmen, Ralph Robinson of the Road Club and Milton M. Cook. ' The seconds were: E. F. Russ ": '(Olympic). '.C.--.M. Smith (Bay City) and Arthur Davidson; (Bay City). These qualified for the final, including A. T. Smith '•'. (Acme), who was third in the fastest heat. '•'_'?■ : Walter . Davidson, from ..fifteen, yards, made the ride of his life In the final. Rugs from the scratCh : mark passed his. field and came up even with Davidson. who had secured the lead. For two laps they had it out' together, neck, and neck, Davidson . finally winning by two lengths. Russ the same -distance, ahead of Robin- Son, Who ran third. The seven men racing around the banks excited the audience to a high pitch of enthusiasm, and the safety of the track -was evidenced when they finished, without an accident. . ■ . Fournler's exhibition on his -'-'Infernal machine" developed the fastest mile he has ridden on the. track. He covered the half in 56 4*5? and the mile In 52 3-5. Fournier continues to be one- of the, big- gest • attractions of - the races, ;. i• - hopes to get the, mile down to 1:50 In another trial or two, and explains" that It is pttt the machine's fault, as its speed. is pr - . t lea lly unlimited, but is: due. to his -:; caution, which he is about ready tothroffl to the : winds. ■ 7. . y - : Harry "Elkes rode a pretty mile .erhioition, paced by tfro tandems. ; When the time was announced the Crowd went Wi.uy for, a new world's indoor paced record of 1:50 2-5 was Created by the gritty Is'ew York rider. He covered the halt in 77 Seconds flat- and beat out his pacers on the last lap of the mile. Kikes is improv. ing every night and his ? appearance Is warmly greeted. „-•- . Eddie "Cannon" Bald,;- the favorite of the grand, stands, rode; a half-mi exhlbitibh. in 56.3-5 seconds, Improving his previous • exhibitions by several se__r.(3s. Bald is fast rounding into form, : and i.iS friends look for a new half-mile record In a night or two. ':•"-'.-•*; : " . . Jimmy Michael,. : the : World middle^ distance champion, rode, a mile paced by Fournler's machine in 1:55 3-5, not equal to Eikes'. time? but rio one questioned but what Michael could have done better after they; saw the way : he beat Out Fournier by h&lf a lap on. the last Heat. .Michael; like the rest of the riders, is becoming thoroughly familiar^ with the track, and when, he -is called upon -to. ride a match with Elkes or some, of the other, middledistance cracks, they : will know they : have been in a race. Y. Notes of .the Meet. "... Judge Kerrigan, and Charles --. Albert Adams* : rehash the Old: Bay City and Olympic troubles every night in the . officials* stand. ■'. '■'■■"■■/ .- "• ;" y . . ". ; ■•'•". - Eddie Games, the • well-known book* maKer, "Skeets" Martin, Ed Purser., the' Qulrin boys arid other, celebrities of the horse track have not missed a night .so far. .'•?■ . ''■--■ : ''■ V ■'' ■■ l y .-."•"■ : (Hint Coulter.. holder of the: world's unpaced mile record,, tried his luck: at tho game again, after a year's retirement, ; and did well. "•7 : "- :-.-",--= : ' ' -X- -'■■■-•.- * -•' ' .*■•'■• Harry Austin Goddard, the hero of. the famous Goddard-Battles race, which stirred -local cycling circles so .two years ago?., again .honored the officials' .box by IV. presefiee. :: ■• Mr Goddard's recent .tripto Australia has developed some English : ideas as to cycle, racing, but he is still .an enthusiast at. the game. AI Swain brought a delegation from . across the: bay-; to cheer for.- the Acme Club's riders, and Waller in particular. • Jay .Eaton : has struck. . a - winning gait at. Last. .-His-' win of 7 the mile open Showed a Vast ImproVemehtVover. his form thefirst two nights. Eearrder Peckham of the Reliance. Club and Austin Goddard exchanged reminiscences about the good old days In "the THE SAN FB AN CISCO GALL, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, ./ 189$ colonies." Mr. Bond, the new purser of the Moana, was their guest for the evening. '-. After seeing the McFarland-Goodman match last night Champion Elkes said that he Would give MeFarland two laps in a ten-mile match and agree to beat him. The lanky San Josean will probably take up this "deft," and it should prove a great race. ' "Dutch" Waller, who started In the sixday race last night, met two of his old opponents :as he came on the track. When he rode his novice race at Stockton on the 4th of July, IS9O. his opponents were Walter F. Foster, who. later became the coast sprinting champion and crack road rider, and David Marshall, who achieved fame on the high ordinary. Foster won the novice race, Marshall second and Waller was distanced. He was not disheartened, however, and to-day ls one of the long-distance champions of the world. The other two have long since retired from racing. RESCUED FROM LAKE MICHIGAN ICEFLOE CHICAGO, Feb. 13. — After being adrift on an Ice floe In Lake Michigan for over fifteen hours, the five people who were carried but Sunday evening by the breaking of the Ice were rescued, and It .Is not expected that . any of them will be much the worse for the experience. ; The castaways were discovered . at daylight by . two young men. who had ventured nearly four miles from the shore in search of the missing persons and were joined a few minutes later by Captain. Fountain and several Of the oarsmen of the life-saving crew from the mouth Of the Chicago River, Miss Orel Manley, the only girl In the party was unconscious from the cold and exposure and the rescuers were obliged to carry the Insensible body of the half<-frozeh' young woman to land. But the four men, though stiff and frost-bitten, were still able to walk, and with -the help of the? fresher members of the band of life-savers', were quickly hurried ashore. : 7Miss- Manley was almost dead when the- life-savers .'came. and for five hours . after .she. Was? brought to j the land she did hot regain her senses; : The. five People tramped tip. and down all : nleht in the. eft or f to keep : warm and finally whet) Miss Marti ey- became unconscious. they made a bed for her of their overcoats. : ; "• y ■"-;-■.;■'?. ??■ ' •:■"■ .'?■ . : -.. .7 "."' ■ SPANIARDS REFUSE TO AID THE FILIPINOS LONDON. Feb? 13.— Reuters Telegram Company has received the following'"dispatch from,' Manila, dated February 13, 3:45 p. m.: ■ y 7 "?;.'■:• -V? 'After the capture of Caloocan a Spaniard who had been a prisoner there came to the Americans, holding up his hands, and said that the Filipinos had offered to release the Spaniards, especially the artillerymen,. . if they would undertake? to fight against the Americarts at' s4 a day. -.Most of the Spaniards refused, and. even those who accepted the offer did so- in the hope of effecting: an escape. The rebels, according to this. informant, are discontented, unpaid;, unfed and thoroughly disillusionized, the talismanic wafers being of no avail against- wounds', hunger' and. fatigue. On Friday Aguinaldo visited . Polo, j a few miles northwest of Caloocan; . arid addressed the. Filipino troops there?, claiming that" he had won a vietbry and asserting that 2300 Americans had been. killed." .' '■■:. DASTARDLY CRIME OF A HOBO AT BIGGS Attack Upon an Eight- Year-Old Girl at the Public , - y ??.'• School? '/'.;' BIGGS,: Feb. 13.— After the morning recess of the public school screams were heard In the girls' room, and, upon Investigation, a hobo was found attempting to make an assault upon an eight-yearold'school girl. When discovered he ran away, followed by the larger boys on horses. He threatened to kill any person who attempted to capture him. 7 Professor Stout and others procured guns and the villain surrendered quickly. He was taken before his little Victim, who identified him. Then he was locked up, pending an examination to-morrow. This afternoon he attempted to cut his way out of the lock-up with a large knife that had been passed to him from the outside by some person. A bunch of skeleton keys was In his cell. Upon: searching his blankets the oincers found an overcoat and two laprobes stolen from the school building earlier in the day. The citizens are very much excited to think their young daughters are not safe, even while attending school, from the assaults of hobos. There is strong talk of. teaching that clement that Biggs from now on will not be a safe place for It. De Lacey Ranch. Sold. SAN RAFAEL, Feb. 13.-The De Lacey dairj* ranch of 1600 acres, with improvements, near. San Anselmo, was sold . today to A. R. Lee of 3Q Montgomery street. San Francisco, for $60,000. It was owned by A. P. Hotaling and Warren Duraon. • FOLLOWING A DOUBLE. Some of the Troubles That a Drumy mer Had: to Contend With. .. "I never realized before," said the man who was telling the story, "the disadvantage of having a double, particularly so when that double happens, to be disreputable. ' . ' ' . . ' "My business takes me about the country a. good deal, arid there is hardly a hotel of any consequence where I am. not known. Three weeks ago I started on one of my regular trips to: interview my customers and get things In shape for a good winter's trade. " "From the very start my troubles began. Instead of /meeting with a cordial welcome from the hotel clerk when I registered, as was usually the case, I was greeted .with a cold stare; a bill was pre- SOME OF THE SIGHTS > AT THE BICYCLE RACES sehted that I never contracted 4 and a threat made to send' for an officer at once If the bill was not promptly paid.. .It took m. some time to get at the bottom of the matter, and when I did I ..was., fighting mad. . ' . . • •■':-, * '.'lt seems that some scamp who looklike, me, and who must have been familiar with my habits and the route that I generally took, kept "Just ahead of me, registering under my name and contracting bills that would have bankrupted me to pay. Nothing was too- good for -the hi-fernal scoundrel. He tooK the best, room ihthe house, had his meals In his room and acted like a nabob, prince on a vacation. :■■".'. '"'•'• ' • ■•• , ."My. name Was good for anything he might order, and he deemed to realize it. When; he: had stayed. as long as he dared he left for the next place without tak- Ing the trouble to pay the bills that = ho had contracted. You can readily Imagine the. reception that I met with when 1 arrived a feW days later. I have been arrested three times, presented with ''a number of bills that I knew nothing about, and chased by. a wronged' husband?.'.'.: "I Was rapidly driven: into, a nervous decline, so I threw up the remainder of my trip and .came, home."— Detroit Free Press. ... ■...-• y ' • Ardup ; Frees ; His Mind. "No, sir, Not a cent i" -was the reply of young Ardup's opulent but untoucha. .relative. • "I've lent you more money already" than you-, will ever pay back You can shift for yourself henceforth. The difference between us is that I am provident, and. you are improvident. ' ..-:'■ ; "The difference between us," vengefully retorted young Ardup? with' his hand ■on' the- doorknob, "is that I'm. a man of"moderate means and you are a man .of immoderate- meanness!" ' '". . Then he fled. yy A SHREWD LOVER. Miss Quickstep— Oh. • wouldn't, you like to live the World's Fair year over again? He— What ! Go back to. a ■ time when 1 didn't know you, dear glrlTWell., I- should say not!— Chicago. Tribune. • -:-,- .' » ■ ' I . Gimm rides an 'Eldridge bicycle. " *•' •:• * . ■"- •■ • ' . ..- • . „.-■ .•' -... ■• :■-,-.;■ 'y TOM SMITH IS A PROMISING GEN JUMPER Caused a Commotion at Ingleside. TYRO, THE FAVORITE, THIRD A BAD AFTERNOON FOR FAVORITE FLAYERS. Mistleton Captured the Distance Event Cyril Beat a Fast Crowd . ■'. of Sprinters— Winyah Won . Two-Year-Old Race. ,■ Nine Jumpers started in the mile hurdle event at Ingleside yesterday, and. rash as the : assertion may seem, it really looked as if eight of them were, trying for, the long end of .the. purse. Joan refused the first jump, and Ballister. fell in taking this same obstacle. Tyro, the Corrigan entry, went to the post favorite, with T. Murphy up, and the stable connections spread the coin about the ring.on "the lepper" In liberal potations. The gelding finished third, after once looking a promising candidate? In ! taking the last leap, y well bunched, Joe Cotton, Tyro and Major S. knocked the abbreviated piece of brush and fencing down. Mattier, on Tom Smith, an outsider? took advantage of the opening with the green one, and outfooting the others on the" flat, . downed Major S a : neck, with the favorite only a head further away. . The whole thing was a revelation, and caused no amount of talk. The favorites spent a dismal afternoon of it. All were rated and corked up tight, with the exception of Prompto, and he was a sluggish choice. Only a fair crowd was in attendance, and the betting .was rather light. y Louis Ez.U's Hanover-Eloise filly „ Winyah. took the three-furlong scramble, starting at odds of 5 to Tanobe and the favorite, St. Agnes, leu into the stretch, whefe-Heririessy oh Wlnyah slipped to the front and won easily. . In a. drive; the first choice, led Tanobe out. a head for- .the place. .--...---- The Eaklns people -again played Dave Gideon's big disappointment for a . i mi "killing," and cashed. . The chestnut glid- . ing was among the twelve starters in. the third number, : a • five furlong . dash, - .- d was. backed down from 6 to 3 to 1. Get* ting away well to a poor start. Hennessy. kept him in front? and he. won ridden 'out. from 7 Silver State. Einstein, the. favorite, away badly, finished in the. show. : 7 The six furlong, selling affair that: followed was a most open : betting race, Prompto with Martin up r having a slight call in the ring at post time. Martin was away well With his mount, arid in front most of the time, downed Good Hope at the end in a hard drive.: The • -Fretter. looked dangerous, at the stretch *urn, but tired, taking the small end of the purse. .The Capture of the. mile and a quarter selling run by' Mistletbn, 7 ridden.by. Bullman, was not . wholly Unexpected; .The Brutus; horse; at odds of 7.t0.2, headed his field In the stretch, and though; given -an argument by Lady Hurst, disposed of .the mare cleverly by a length. The Bachelor, a receding favorite; contented himself with the show. ■ Everybody. strung their checks pn-Mon-' tallade In the final six furlong sprint to get even. Ryan's horse never looked dangerous, finishing In third place. Butler on Cyril rode a very pretty, race, and; getting up to Mldlight shortly before the wire was.' reached, earned the verdict by nearly, a length. The winner was 5 to i in the: betting.. : ■".:-. ■ '■ ' • Track Notes. ..-Spencer has been In the. habit. of accepts ing engagements and then breaking them, Mr. Spencer, the late-comer, was reminded of the fact yesterday with a $50 fine, from the stand. : CrOmWell was ordered scratched, from the rrilleand a quarter run by order of the judges. In an event at Oakland he was a record breaker, but. at Ingleside some days ago : could not untrack himself. The matter will be referred to the board : of stewards, and- his entry may in future be refused altogether. James E. Butler, the millionaire merchant of New York City, was a spectator at the races. Mr. Butler Is a great lover of the harness horse, and. his. East View stack farm is one of the model breeding establishments of the country. He is the owner of the game turf .hero and sire. Direct, and of the noted campaigner. Directum Kelly. y Seventeen books cut In yesterday,: three less than at the previous drawing. 7 On February 6, when Monita was played ; for such a good thing, and was beaten by St.. Jacob, Tom Smith Was among the entries. He was ordered scratched, by the judges as being a dangerous element In the race through his inability to jump. . To-Day's Entries. ? ; First race— Three furlongs; two-year-oldsmaidens. . : ■■'.*'••" ' •' 646 Mountebank — 118 661-Bamboulla .... 118 606. Tanobe .."...:.. 110 646 Pldalla ......... no ... Tar Hill — list 553 Sardine .....110 y Second race— One mile; selling; three-year- I olds. . . . .... (656)M11t. Y0ung.".... ,1081 632 Ballsta ......... 112 ! (6"6)Stamlna ...- .108 (854)Raclvan 105 656 Merops .108.1 632. Strongol l ........ 108 j • Third race— furlongs: selling. 660 Merry 80y... ....112 636 Cava Ho ..?...'.'. ■ 636 Schrritz '..;' 115 507 Cutaway .'.- 115. j .440 McPryor 112 653 Joe Mussle 112 ' '669 Two Cheers .112 640 Cab.rillo .........115 ; (648) Credo ......<. ....'109 653 Una C010rad0.... 112 619 Wyoming ........112 : Fourth race— Seven furlongs; selling; threeyear-olds and upward. . 637 Judge Stouffer...lo6l.(6So)Orlon ..■ „..il2. 643 Imperious- ...105 655 Highland 8a11.. .108 (657)Tam'.ny Hal 11.-. 109- (649*Ferrler 11l 655 Bonnie .....104, 531 Joe- Ullman.. ....109 643 Guilder . -.... 106 648 Don't Skip Me... 104 ..Fifth race— One and an eighth miles; gelling. 658 Topmast- . „.107 j(s4B)Rey del Tlerr_;.._o4' 658 Morlnel ;. „,,,„ 94 1(663) Espionage ....... 83 ?lxth race— and a half furlongs; three- . : ear-olds and upward. .602 Dl&ra ".,...:....,. .1061 668 Little T. 0...... ; 107 : I 565 Ulm "..-.. ......106 647 Lime-water "..■.:■'.. 106". 1 • 645 Storm King... ...116. 539 Sombre."'. ....101 i '■ 669 Allyar .-..-.. Wfji 687 Ed Gartland.....io9 | 601 M. Burnham,:..lll| 617 "W-hl-tcotfiß .......113 . .671 Novla .. .- .-.■■-. 106 1 649 Lord Marmlon,, 112. /Selections for To-Day. First race— Sardine, .Bamboulla? .Mountebank? ■ Second race— Batista. Milt Young. . Strohgoii.? Third race-^Credo, Wyoming, Cabrlllo. Fourth race— Joe Ullman-, Orion, Imperious Fifth: race-^-Esploiiage, Rey del Tler'ra, Top? i mas*. ; : i Sixth rAce^-Ailyar, Sombre, Storm King, j Mrs. Sweeney Used a Gun. Mrs, Sweeney, who.keeps a saloon audi grocery at. 23 Clementina street, was ar- J rested last. night on a. charge of assault to kill. 7 Her. story Is that William Sears arid " Ed Lee were in her store. She ordered: them to go out and one. of them threw a ! scale Weight at her; They, then left the I place,- but later returned and.broke a win- ! dow. -She then fired four shots at them, i . but hone took: effect. , The two men were ■ also arrested and charged with malicious i i mischief.. "•.'-' ."..-. • " : ——. ' SHARP PRACTICE AT THE HUB. Brown .'lived between Gray and-Green. Green was .as Quiet a Neighbor as you could wish to have, and so was Gray "for that matter, but he had . a barking dog that- was the torment of Brown's life. One day in his. desperation he told Gray that "if he would get rid. of the dog he would give him. $5? "AH' right," said Gray,"l'll do it." Meeting Gray downtown that af- ' te.rnocfn Brown : asked,- "Have you done wharyQu agreed to do. and got-rid of 1 that dogT' Gray—Yes, I've got rid.of him. Brown—Thank goodness. Now. I shall sleep nights.' By the way, what did you . dp with him? Gray—l- sold, him to Green He gave-me $3for him. Not so bad, eh— Transcript.. ; '• ■•••■ ... .' ■■• ■ .*">.■. . '..'.= '...'-.' . Hale rides an Eldridge bicycle. '•■'*•■ j 'mfflmU-. .. ' . . ' ■ ' - . • • THE CALL'S RACING CHART. ■ - INGLESIDE : RACE TRACK, Monday, Feb. v 13, 1899.-Forty-fourth J day of the Pacific Coast Jockey Club meeting.; Weather fine- last, y, EDWIN F. SMITH. Presiding Judge. 7^y__ ■ \ " JAl^~ F. CALDWELL, Starter. 7 y PARLIAMENTARY HARD LABOR. Congressmen Will Sympathize With ' What Is Expected From En g'"•'. - , lish Commoners. i 7 - \' •'"- ? ■" Speaking at the annual dinner of the : Oldham Licensed Victualers' Association recently, • Mr. Ascroft. M. P.. said the! following were . a few of the ..things ex- | pected from members -of Parliament to day: (1) He- must be always -1n.;., the i. House of Commons/and at the; Same time never away from his ;-. constituency. ( (Laughter;). ' (2): He must support every religious, philanthropic and charitable object, assist football, cricket, swimming, athletic clubs, patronize, all theaters, and concerts, be ready to open every bazaar and sale Of, work. . (3) He must watch every question that affects the ; place ; he . represents " and secure It-- fair treatment, i (4) He must be ready to speak sensibly, j at a moment's notice on every question. : (Laughter.) (5) must be able to prophesy every change that will occur in' the next twenty years, and vote accord- i ingly; (6) He must be able to obtain. in- i te'rviews for his constituents ; with every f public department whenever the same has ' been refused. (7) He must advocate ; free trade and at. the same time abolish prohibitive foreign tariffs- (8) : He must -have thorough knowledge of all acts of Parliament affecting public health, poor law, police, school board, voluntary schools, municipal affairs, trade, army and navy, labor, and licensing. (9) He must keep his eyes; open and call.attention in the House to every grievance from which his constituents suffer. . (10) He, must see that the constituents have a fait share of gifts and . appointments at the disposal of the government. (11) He must be ever ready to speak In any constituency when asked, and at the same time not neglect his own. (12) fie must never take the wrong view of , any question which may suddenly come to; the front-. (13) He must know. every town, river, port, railway, and canal, whether constructed or in. course of; construction, in Europe, Asia, Africa and America, and . every treaty of : concession affecting the same. (Laughter.) (14) He must read every blue book, bill, or other public paper issued, and be ready .to answer and explain all i questions, (15) He must always be able to grant interviews to his constituents .'no ■■'•' matter what other appointments he mayhave. ; (16): He must ■' never ill nor meet with an accident. (17) He, must arrang-- ?; and introduce deputations to Minister-* and sensibly ; advocate their . requirement*.' ? (18) He must pay his own election expenses and keep himself while in Parliamerit. <19.) must not give offense by not answering letters; 7 whether they re- • quire: one or -not. ; (Laughter.)-' " (20:). .He must never make an enemy, and be more popular when he retires than when he was: elected,. and not he surprised if he finds a stranger captures his seat. (Laughter;)— London Telegraphs .-"■ - :< ' — ■ — ■ ■ :_»■■«-. — ■'• - — Progress in the Philippines. ' People who; .think that. American civilization will be slow in obtaining a foothold in the. Philippines should subscribe for the American Soldier, a. paper that is pub-: lished at Manila, and a copy of which has just been laid upon our desk. In a. fiery article, on the first page the editor, explains why no man should try to enter . the - dining room of any first : class, hotel in his shirt sleeves. . As may readily be guessed? he makes : but an. In-- "•■ disputable case • .On another page the following advertisement. is printed in bold. type: ■--. •.;-:--' : "PIES! PIES! PIES! ' ... "Home-made pies-, doughnuts, biscuit." 7.. ■ ■ *"*"■*" ■ **> * ! 1 . ; Presence of Mind. "That woman showed wonderful presence of mind when her horse ran away " "Is that -what you call it? She threw down the reins and yelled?" "I know she- did. and the horse ran straight down the street; If she had held ' on to the reins she would have doubtless : steered him into the fence."— lndianapolis Journal. y :r> ■■ '■■ - - ' — ■ ♦ « — '■*-■ — i ' ■y'-y/y ": ' No Compulsion. ?y :v. :! .;7-V-."-; Hicks— What was it, anyway, that drove Browne to drink? Wicks— l never observed that Browne had to be driven.— Somerville Journal. „-■".. — <-'■—• — «■•_».'«' y ':.;.'-' ''.?■• Miller -rides an Eldridge bicycle. * Half ' A.m&t ; ' Won By. .7 I ■ - ■■ '' __. ■--'■■-. Second. '.-.- -• Third. .: . Time. ":-• First heat.*.4........... : *A*. J. Davidson- 05K. I Second "heat -„.'.........: R. Robinson (25J..;.. .Thlrd.'heßt;"w......v...aM.:M, Cook r50j.. : . . I . FINAL HEAT.;. .».>.. i W. J. Davidson '■'->..■ ',' F. Russ <scr.)...i '. __, gnaitli .fscr ) . "." .Davidson -(38) .3 .* *. F. (ttcr.)... I [y £ 1:02 I 5 1:03: .1:03 4-5" I*ol 3-5- One-mile Open, Pro- '■.:■'■ ■'./ i " -. ■;".*•'■.- . ■ -fessional-r. •- > I •'■ .- ■ ■:■.■.-.:;'•. '..-:■'' First heat..;- ..-.> • ..-.v.'., .v. 1 Jay Eat0n.. ..,.,.. ■".,. . Charles S. •'VV.IIb'.': . ; - Ke<*,ond\lieat... ; ■ . . ... •>.-,• j" Hardy Downing. .* .'- "V. G." Furrnah., ,....'. Third- heat .". ... . *.." .v." '*'.".'. ,* O. L. Stevens...... :. Teddy. Goodman.;-;. : ... FINAL HEAT,....." .".-.! Jay Eat0n.., .„:.,...-; P.?.*.: 5teven5........:. I Lawson ai .223 F. G.-.Daoey.y.. • ?:15.«-5 F. J. Cotter..;.... 2:17 3-5 H. Downing ■„ i. .2:16 3-5 Five-mile, match race, paced, between! Floyd A. Mct"_rlan<" of San Joee and Teddy • "Ooodrha'n-.'of New York — ■.:,: \ .■■■;.-■■■" - : ' '.■•";■" :"'.' : •.'••'-' •'*. '•■:•-■■? —.:.';.: ■'■;•■.■- Won by McFarland.. ...7.. .^... „.......: : : :.y. '.:.,./,■ ;_."•..;.•."... ...??."..«- .7 10:06-1-5.' One-mile exhibition by Henri Fournier ori hts motor 'cyc1e...... ..,.,;;....;......:..; 1:52 8-6 One-mile 'exhibition,- paced, by. Harry Kikes, Glen .Falls, N: Tv ...'.:.....,.......... 1:50 2-5 Half-trille exhibition : toy Eddie Cannon Bald- chahipioft : short-distance^- rider .of the - v.V ° W0r1d •..'....: :..: .... ,-...,.."..,; i; ;... .-. '..;....<,:-.'-. .•..,—'•..,.:-.■;■'.. v.v. ; ;..- ...•:.:...'. ............ :56 3-6' One-mile exhibition .toy- Jimmy Michael, champion- ' middle-distance* rider of the 7 " " ° world",-,. .■;,. t »w--i..,.»..ij.(....»t.M.» J .....« o =-■■>-. ■■..... .-..,..."... „.. y. .'..;.-. ......... —v : 1:55 3-5 Score at 2 A. M. CONTESTANTS. 2 .5* I "t Waller .i . . .:. ........ . ... . . . Miller ...... .... ..." • ....... Glmm . ... ........ ....... .. . Pierce : . .V. ... . . . .;. . . . . ... . Albert* . . ..... . . . > i . . . . . . . I n \i •>■> u i . . . . ..', . . . . ..... .-. >»>vn' ... ..... ....,'. . ■ i ... . i . An roil. .... . . Hale .. . .;....::... ....... . Jnliati ...'. . .'. • .•■. ....... . . . . Frederick ....... . . . . . . . . . , Tnrvllle . . . . . . . . . ...;..... j venn .... ... . • . . ........ Chapman ...... . a . ..... . . . . i Mil r ii ti t) v .................. Habitant ... .... ............ \ * l- i ter . ..... . . . ...... i. . | PIP las ton . . . . . . . .......'.. j I 63 I 5 I 68. 5 j 03 | 3 | «3 | « j 83 | 4 | 03 | 5 I «3 (. 0 | 63 | 6 j 03 | G | 03 ; ft i 5r i 2 j 03 j 0 03 | 7 I 64. 0 | 63 | O i 08 |,3. 03 12 666. FIFST Index.. Horse. DDD. ' -■ - ■■ ■■■•■•-;-.'■ - -■ -■••■:■--• /..;.... 1 Betting. index Horse. I Weight. St. Km. ; . ■ %ni:.. %m. Str. .^ Fin. < __JoCkeys__,Op_Cl. ! 661 Wlnyah ,...:.I~109 4 .... •; ... ... m St. Agnes...... ......m 3 ,. - ••; ; . . ... • 11 , 1 1 , SnJder .■.„..» jo 25 646 Tanobe i. — J« ? .."• *.*•.■■ \\ . 44 nutter ..;..... -i- *- ... Tantlc ....... £•>• J« » — — . "' .. J *;• I * . ■ : iiman ...... 3-2.V&-2. :\ •661 Belle of Palo Alto.. 110 1 ■■■ »•■■ ■-•-•■'■ 5_ JL_ — " u^ . — r^da'^UU':; i Tlme-H -12^F%~:37:""winner..L. H. Evil's ch f. by Hanover-EIoise. ; Good start. , ; ; started for pick-up money. , . ■ . ■ - ■ " '■ ■ ■ , . .■ ' lV___ .;_^_. . .^_l- rJ^rr^=: Weight. ; «m. . %m. \,m. Str. Fin. Jockeys. T CLCf7 SECOND~BACE-One mile; four-year-olds : and upward; over four hurdles; purse, ***>** $4oo.:- : - . - ■■:■■-■•■■ '■••••■• ■-. •• - ■•; ■■/;■■■■■-■■_ , :..'::'.':';.' pBeTtl^i: Index Hor,, Age. Weight.jSt. ' ' ' 14m. . : " W %m. ; ! Str. Fin. Jockey ! _jOP L _Ci: 248 Tom ; Srnnh; 8 .r-jp | ' ■ £ , ;g . \, > % \: , Wify M4 Major S. 6.........-125 8 .;.-•.■•»; |J. , | h . ; V. .. 3 i:: c T.vMurphy;.^ 6-5, :yl v 844 Tyro, a ...139 .7 .... • 4 n ..-:.*-" ...*«.. . • .' ■ : 4 G ,.,: . Kerri|1: ,.;.;..;., ... 4 : ; ... 6 : ;v. : 644 Joe Cotton, a.... 133 3 2 1 in .** : ..... . • r. ■ ; -5x4 -McAuUffe >..;., 5'2-,::;J.^,--, . 631 Monlta, a. ......12J 2 64 • i 1 41 • : 6 6 Henry ,■.:••■> 10 ,15. 639 Arundel. a... 1« *• . J £ «*. ; I. ' : •' < "'" -: : "-= 7 -^ irOppefson ..... 10S. 12 ■ 603 Billy McCluskey, 6..129 6 ..•» h. . 6,2 . -.7 ■ ••• . ,.;■■:■• •- Lenhsirt ...... « 15 : 654 Ballister, >..... ....... |7 1- .. * . : -. ■•'•. •. ;•■•;•.-..., ;" • V ... .'; Tr imiets ....-■■ 20 : 60 ' 644 Joan, a..... — ...... 129 » t ■ ■ jl^v_ — _n^ — _-■ ■ — ■ ■ ....- — - :.'.■.•'■■■: ;■"..:.., .^ ■■.:■.'?:■■] ' ; TTme-rM-r^Wlnner. A. M. ; Linnell's blk. *.': by Clarendon-Sparrowgrass. Good start. .. Won flrat three 'driving. '• '■•.,• • v ,. y.iiv.,1 : i n ludk • Cld not. have': to take :. the last .. ton was bumped. -:■• : : "•,• ■•■ • ;>, / ■ .• V. ; - - . ■ V:'a ■:: '.v , : : :-' ■ \ ;.- : -: : ; • . Scratched— Our Johnny 125. . : :..'.. ■ ■-.- . ■■■--. ' -■■: . :/■;:: :^^ ■■' '■,'•■■' 667. . ! Index. Horse. Age. Weight.! 157 :iV: 7 •' 5.2. > ... :;Mi-;." 1 62 4 4 34 ..- 2 h I ?. .4 h : 2 h ■ - I h ... :■•• .3 1.. 3 2 1 lh 2 4 ;.. 4 G I 64/ ! 5 4 :.; 6-6- •: . ... . ,-..6 4. - It. • • 3 I'. .Jl;. .■ ... .. : -,-6 6..." I 6 -8 h ■••*.*•; .;•*:■ ' ' . "••■•■ -■-■ 'I - ; i., •■■ . ... . : : y«.;.; .■;<♦'■:•:>.>■ ••?:?' 9 ■;;.. t -:■ .- ■....•-•■■.>..:..•■• ■•;■•■ ■ ■• >»•-■> Mm. : 1/ » tI * w Km. ; Str. Fin. . .. . ...^ _. ,; ....... ■ Jbekeys. j Mattier .V^ J. RoulUler ...... T. Murphy...- [Kerrih •-.-;.:- r,-. McAuUffe. \\.~.:.- Henry ........ Epperson .•-■• Lerihart ..;■.....• TiHmlaii .y.:: ftfift ™ IRD BACE-Flve furlongs; Belling; four-year-olds and upward; purae, 1400. - - ~ I %m. j; %ni... Str. Fin. Jockeys. I. Index. Horse. Age. Weight.' 648 Eakin P v' 5 ..U.:^r^ 661 Silver State., a... ..,,106.1 ......:, J.V4 || 4 « [. Z .. H.Martin ; ■ 18-5 ■ . 660 Einstein. 4... -104 1 , ... * r: «■:•. 2 h i 4 'A ■ I Pwell 20 8 475 Little T O. 4.. 02 3 ... 3.1 S3 ?h 4 5* fc-BrtSeM 60 100 • 660 Non«, Such. 4.,..,... 06 10 ... .- M.V ; 1 1 - .. "} 4 . « h . : Beauchamp .- 8 . 15 ■ II Ch.pol, mil fill i 1 1{J |l|pili II |^g=SJI ■ : g gy; 8 ' I' ■ ■ I llffi J_^S Tlme^% -24'j- %,.:36H: %, 1:02. Winner. C. H. : Koblcke's ch. g. by Iroauois-Carlotta, ■ G0 °E4^-^"d fl pfen t ty r o'f fced.^ Silver State ran an improved : Pint's showing \ I, to be regreued. Martin was careless at the barrier. Don lose him Midas, was be-, : . calmed He likes a etlff breeze. Chappie forgot his eyeglass. Distinction almost left. . ■ ■ ™c 0 ratch P e d- Crawford 108, Ball verso 104, Uncle True 104, Zora«0. 111, Mocoritb 102, Jim ; • Bozeman 108. . ■■ ■ ■■ : ■■.'■'. ■.■■'.'.' '■■' : .-"■'■• . ■ ■■'■'■ ~ : ' 'j__ ■; .'■' . '.--.'. •' - ' —^-1—^-." .- . f»f»Ck FOURTH RACE-SLx furlong* ; aell Ing; three-year-olds and upward; purse, *400. Index. Horse. Age. Weight. ;■ ';' Um.. •/'• Hm. : \m: Str. Fin. Jockeys. ( 63S Prompto, 4 .107 629 Good Hope. 3... S2 BSS The Fretter, 3 101 543 Lady Britannic, 4.. 105 BS9 Genua, 3.. 96 69S Heigh Ho, 4.... 102 651 Fnrmella, 4. ........ .10* R14 Pick Behan, a 110 637 Torlblo, 4..,. ...1M 653 Two Cheprs, a...... 107 1 ■ ... ■.: ii ■.■■.-. v=2}4\"-. .i-« : *rj-1 2 ■ ■ -...■ . 3h ••■ ■ 4 1 ■■■ ■ .8 I..- ,2 h- ::• ■■5 : ■;;..■.'-.■■' 6 ■%' :•:'. 3i- :4l .-■ • 3 V. ..i 6 • • -•• ... ■"■: Bh • . 6 1 -.- ■ 5 V, . 4 1 ;•. A-: ••-...■., tjj...'' -l^--:2V2.;\.:B%r.:, 7 •■■•■...■■•■." 7%. ■• 71 ..■••\6V . ■ 6 l.-y-:- :3> ; ... ■■.:-.4:V,>/£^--,:7:^-:.v7h,-:: ■I:. ■■•;*;!••;■. ■■■8 ?-' -;8-h--.; I 3 8 3 ig ... 8 2 8h *2 9 2 | •g;; .... -■:■ .It) •'■,-.;•.•■'. 10 •■ ■■::.-M-.: :; : 10 V"--; H. Martin..... 2 13-5 Ward 3 4 I. Powell...... 10 15 Bullman ...... 10 IS Devln 4 7-3 J. Relit........ K 8 Rutter ......... S 15 Hahn ' Frawley ; 15 SO Tisne-H ••■-25- % :49H: H. l:tS. Winner, H. L. Jones & Co.'s b. h. by Racine-Rosebud. ■ ■ G °^a^n t -beSt : n^ule h^ne d tWs n !rip. Ward on Good did the best he oould. His: • ■mount looked the best. The route tr,o: far f or Something happened Formella. It -;; ■ was too indistinct to be perceived with field glasses. ■■■ - ■/„;,■,■: V-;-'^ .•;:■•;;;-: --.--.' ; , J -: ■ KrrAtched-.Y.ankeg^Doodle^O^^g^d Scratch 92. : >;\ .^-Vy ;;.. y; c -;■■■.,:..: =.-^;. ..■/,..,-. ; :-y- : .,:. nrrn FIFTH : RACE— Orie- -and' : a ; quarter miles; ': selling; three^year-olds ; and upward; :v D(U» .•purtW.-W). ' ■ . ■ ■ . ■■' -; : ---■ ■-.- - [■.' ■■:.-.. : : ■ ' ■ .' ■ — - . -..■•■■• ■ . . | . : ■ ....-: ■ ■ : ■■• .;. | ■ (Jettins. Index. Horse. Ag«, Weight.'St. gtd/'; *4m. Hm. %m. Str. : Fin:. ;;: V J ; Jockey?. J/^;^ €^-:f K5<1 Mintieton 4\ 107 V 7 * H 3 h 2 1 JI 1 1. I.Bullman j 3 7-2 ■ rS5> L.adv Hurst ' 6 104 I-' 6 1 - •■7- *: - ; 7O • 6 2 ■; KjJi ! li, W*bef^;;;.;.p 10 12 ■! / ( if The y Bache[or!a::..10 6 5 h 5-1. 6 1 4 £ 3 H Ms' JU^^V.J 7-5 9-5 • «R Hardiv 4-- - . ,v.'..:iO5 • 2' '■ -4 .1 • / • • 5- 1 .• -. ? V . •" 6 : '/i-?-4..b, ■•-.. -.4 .-.%■.'; .Gray. ....*.»... I: .4 .-. 8 . ; ■•■665 Krt'Bonner 5...10S ; 3 1 %[■ : 1* 2 2 :.^3 ; 6 6 ■ :. fih ■ Henries*....;.;. ]v 10 ■ : 15 % B12 Our ClimatP 6..::..106 7 2Hi 21 Ih Ih 5 «i 6 10 Rutter 1" 5 ■JJHuVr WorfoVd, S....S6! 4_8 4'*: ■-■?• . :.V7; ■ " : [J. KelfC.. — ..i ; : 4 9-2 ..-.■. . • •■ • ?r"irne^ii : -25 : - ft ' :C0U: '%v- lrieH: mHe, 1:43; l<4m. . 2:<Wi w:r.r.--r. William Boots & Son's ; eh h: by lrnp"Brut'us-MI?tretoe. Good-start. ;, Won ri(M«ii .out. Second and third driving. .,■•.-:;: '■ ■ MistiW*>n was by. no means- overlooked. .A- plunger from the Sunny South was there. ; ;: - Iiajj*- Hurst was best. The Bachelor miesed his train. Hardly received ; -f ; melting ride. :' ' V/ufford sulked. . : :i.(W;:.Imperl^uS ■ ■.;•■■. \:^y.K- . : : '.'"'\ '■:] 2 : -'r S^-v^^v'^V-^.';' :^'-'V^ . Scrritched— Cromwell .109. Imperioug 107. \ ■-■ ■.•'■■..■.'/. : ■ ■ ■ . ■:■.'.:■',-.'.. " ' '■ Index. Horse. A**. Weight. 'St- gtd, ; i.':to. %ni. Str. Fin. Jockey?. .'. ■•-■ /*^i SIXTH RACE— Six furlongs; selling; three-year-olds and upward; purse, $400. Z '\\'-*"l .■■::■■.: •■•':■■ ■:■■■;.-:■:. : >:--' : ■'■''.:■'■■.■■ y '■■'.- .:-:|.- ■ : -{;> : v .^ /;;" TSettin*. index? Horse. Age; Weight. St. %m. Vim. :..%m:...: Str. Fin. ! Jockeys. Ipip. Oj ■ ■ (6") -Cvrll 4...:..:.......-lM' 1: > .-;. ... ■ :: .- 3 1 : : ■■;,;; 1 1 ; . ■: .2-2. .;:.■• •■2 24 Rutter ........ "-. 3 ■ -8.-. , ! ■■i< M' Hl'fcht ■■-5' 107 i ... lh 11 22 2 Vi J. Weber 6 8 ,■ .. Montillid.. 6.. .....10:; 2 -.....,. f^ |H 3f H H. Martin, .... 1 6-5 fi-, «if T'rlan 3.......... .90! * ... 4 h 6 4 V4 4 V4 . De-vln 12 21 '•-EBS-Novli. 4 -.;;,;.■.. ..-..vlO6 4:.- ■ '..; ;-. : .. : .* :' ■ - r - ; -6%jv:- 5 : 2 .. : .-S 2 :.:. Powell:- :...:..,. :1O: : 24 • •• tfeay kuxM\o.".4.:...^.^_.109( 3;^__. v __; - 2 "■•"■'• :?>?>.:v*"^r.?: : ; v- fBuilman _ 8_ 3 ■ " ; :.'jl m e^-3i; : i»Vi; "If :4S%:*1. 1:1414. Wlhner ( P, Ryan's b. by Buchanan-E&panita. i :: ; Good start. Won first three, driving. •. :>: :/; :•■-.. /^ 1 '''^--"'.^.-]; ;, ; - ; ' : ■■•-' ;: '- v; ''^ : ' : ; ?: ; -'- v;^-' ■•: Mntallade received the most Aupport,- Maxello blew up with startling:. effects at head \v • ■ of' (Stretch; ' ■ Cyril : appeared neglected in . the ring. . Sir Ur.ian ran a parking race. -. '■■ '.: ; ~i\ -':■■■■ -.- Scratched— Guilder 108, Opponent 10*. Amelia, Fonso 106, Zamar II 107. jndox;" Horse. Age: Weight, ';■'.: . i '.%m-./o ,i»m;.,-.;'^»ni::;-.: Str. Fin. y. ■ ADVEBTISEMENTS. y All Ailments of Men. No Pay Till Cured. .....' .Patients: who have the least - doubt being .ured-.iflay; deposit the price a' ■ ...cure in any bank or. with any well-known business house or. newspaper in San Fran- ; - -Cisco, such deposit "NOT to be paid to *>r. Meyers & Co. until the patient is con- ;. vinced he is permanently cur*_.: It., patients prefer they, may make monthly payment.. •'■ .- Largest Medical Institution and Most Extensive Practice In America. DR. MEYERS & GO,-. Wm^r^yy TAKE ELEVATOR. fioun 8 to 5 ._jly. E"*«_ln*{. 7 to 8. aand.ys 9 to 11- - '" -■■'■■ ■ ' . ■?.- - ;

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