The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on March 17, 1949 · Page 10
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March 17, 1949

The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 10

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Thursday, March 17, 1949
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Page 10
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FAGBTEff BLTTHEVILLE <AKK.) COURIER NEWS THURSDAY. MARCH 17, 10<19 ; News Of The World Told In Pictures + In spite of Bcrlin'i heaviest snowfall of the year, the airlifI continues Its operations uninterrupted. Here, • "flying boxcar" has Jusl unloaded a cargo of llrcs at Templehof Airlicld [or (he blockaded city. (Photo by NEA-Acme stall correspondent Joa Schuppe.) SPRING OFFENSIVE IN THE COLD WAR Some diplomats believe Scandinavia's action regarding Atlantic Pact might cause Soviet Union to move against Finland along linci of Czech coup. weak ImV in me Iron Cur* tain. Russia reportedly has decided Czech Reds ar independent and may focus on them. It feori Premier Klement Gottwold, in growing disfavor, may turn into another Tito. U. S, Minister Chap in Warned Slate Deportment Hungary is building up army, in violation of peace treat)'. Red Army officers ore allegedly organizing Hungarian troops into action squacfi," presumably aimed against Tito. ia shitt- ed her sights to Eastern M e d r t e r raneart, demanding that Turkey outline its attitude an Atlantic Pact, or subsidiary Mediterranean agreement. This maybe start of renewed Soviet driYt to gain bigger voice Tn contiol ot Dardanelles. with Moscow s backing, Albania began war of ncnres against Tito with a call to Yugoslavs to ccro Spurred by a Jalo unit under each wing, an Air Force B-45 four-jet bomber makes a spectacular take-orT in tests at Muroc Air Force Base in California. The Jalo units add 8000 pounds of thrust ; to the 20.000 pounds provided by the four jet engines. The plane is in Ihe 550 mph class. -A Brooklyn manager Hurt ShotUm hands out assignments lu Dodger rnascots Toddy, center, and Lynn Parrptt in Vero Beach, Fla., camp. The able assistants are sons of traveling secretary Harold Parro'.L EUSS1A PKEPS FOR ANOTHER ROUND IN. COLD WAR: This map highlights significant developments in Communist strategy which indicate stepping up 6f the Soviet Cold War spring campaign in Eastern Europe, The events show that Russia is concentrating more on building up the Iron Curtain, following her drastic cabinet shakeup. Dr. Walter Bothe, left, Germany's senior nuclear physicist, explains Heidelberg University's 12- million-volt cyclotron to a cancer specialist. The atom-smashing machine, only one in Germany to survive the war, is being used for "peaceful research 1 ' with permission of the U. S. Allied scien- r i tists say it would take Germany at least 100,000 years to produce a single atom bomb with the cyclotron, which has about l/20lh the volt capacity of American machines. Hot Shot, a cow belonging to Kay Kaufman, upper right, Halstead, Kan., farmer, doesn't care for the mechanical age. While being milked {or the first time with a new milking machine, Hot Shot had enough of modern civilization and boiled upstairs to Ihe hayloft. It took three men to hobble her and give Ihe cow her First trip in the air. i ^ i ^ ^ Racing upstream against strong Mississippi River currenls, the dicsel-powered Harry Truman failed to beat the record of the famed Robert E. Lee. The Lee ended ils historic race along a 1051-mile course In three days, 18 hours and 14 minutes in 1870. The Truman, pushing one barge laden with 1100 tons of cargo, failed to match that speed by one hour and 16 minutes, although the distance from New Orleans to St. Louis is now considerably shorter due to changes in the river channel. Here, the modern barge Is shown 80 miles north ot Memphis, Tenn. John M. Franklin, above, New York shipping official, is considered a likely candidate to succeed Army Secretary Kenneth C. Royall, who, according to specu- UUon, will resign the post. Franklin was a mijot general during the war and served as •tiartar.t chief of transportation lor UH army. More like a creature of a forgotten \vorld than a naval airman, Harold Cheshire, of the British aircrait carrier Vengeance, inflates the new "Mae West" flying suit in Edinburgh, Scotland. The' suit protected him during the Roynl Navy's six- week maneuvers in the Arctic. Facing D battery of news cameras, a slubborn elephant cauliouslj walks down the gangplank of a plane at New York's International Airport, after a 12,000-mile flight from Singapore and Siam. The modern Noalvs Ark carried a cargo ot 133 tropical animals destined for U. S. zoos. Only the six elephants aboard caused any trouble during the trip. They refused to leave Ihe plane, withstood pushing and hauling, but finally were enticed out with peanuts. once spanned the canal at ne Iron Birder. The small Five years ago when Gene Tierney's liisi child was born, the movie actress encouraged her baby's muse lo invent a disposable bollle. The nurse, Adda May Allen, wcnl to work and developed the ' All lhats left of this bridge, which 0 Karlsplatt, in Berlin, Germany Is one Iron Birder. The small ille nurse, Aacia May mien, wcni 10 work and developed me bridge was destroyed by Hie retreating German army In \945 But nursing botlle in time for Gene s second daughter, Christina, to use. the Germans, even old women like the one being helped down, Here, in the arms of her mother, the 3<,j-monlli-old baby drinks still usa tha precarious crossing. (Photo by NEA-Acme slat! flom lhe Pte-slcrilizcd bottle that is thrown away alter being correspondent lift Schuppa.) used OIK * New York Giants' inficldcr Jack Lohrkc limbers up at Phoenix, An*., pl.iyi"B leapfrog with pilchcr Andy Tpmasic. Icfl. and ihorlslop Buddy Kcrr.. Air Force Reserve. Sergeant TUtcl IF chicl clerk in the ollice Lt.-Gen. George Sliatemcyer.