The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on December 11, 1895 · Page 3
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 3

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Algona, Iowa
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Wednesday, December 11, 1895
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Page 3
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^ I ' ,._~~i.«!fci...i7tlLl.-. _j! >»•> LJ 3lJ*^j^i.S*-'*.":.»'...«.--' .TouYit&rattre t ^ A till me, Mies, thai yWre • ttiegifl - That wake all i ' the iearts in '(*•• ™t *"*"'* That made such a - -, ' tri 'singular so* ''<"' clal swirl, '. 1 And yet fdutid, none to'mar- ry* , JB-lKalght, the Baron, My Lord, the V* 'Duke, ?ere ndne of them.to your liking? ,—J'gave them all .rebuff, rebuke, |".While dancing, driving, biking. jfell, naught care t for your triumphs " t , galore, , /dtir 'doWer, or po.wer, or pelf. flm simply a clerk in a dry goods store ' "I offer you, Miss, myself. -Tom 1 Hall in Truth, Wanted a Surety. jj * Prlma-'Donna—This is your papa, J^darling. Will you not'kisfe him? !i!r- Darling—Not unless you're sure he's to be it for good.—Truth. A Devoted Son-In-I.aw. Count de Vermicelli, an Italian noble- nan now in New York, is engaged to he married to Miss Maud Snobberly of Fifth avenue. One, of the guests at a recent social "gathering at the,. Snobberly mansion lasked old Mrs. Snobberly (she used to pe-a servant girl), how she liked her (^prospective son-in-law. e replied: "Me and Mr. Snobberly ire both tickled to death with Count |<le Vermicelli, and the way he is stuck sfbn. Maud is a sin. You can have no |idea of how the Count dotes on that |gal,. Everything in the world that he "^imagines she wants he makes us buy for her." t' Compartment, i"When Mr. Boozle'landed iii New York irom a Liverpool v steamer the other day ,!h'e gave every appearance of having ftad a long and severe tussle with the lowing bowl. A friend was on the Jock 'to meet him, 'and when he per- pfeived'his condition he said: I J'Are there water-tight compartments jfn your ship, Boozle?" "Betcher life. Chuck full of 'em." thought so. And you had one, iidn't you-?" "'I'dno, Why?" " You 'don't look as though a drop ol rater got into you during the entire Shabby, lazie— So Ethel has married her FA eh? ^aisle— Yes, but be married her per false pretenses, 'E[bw so?" !He instated the consumptive cough £t up to the marriage ceremony, and dropped it, the lirute!"~-New York ^aseenger (to coachman, who is driv F . t . »• break-neck • speed)—Stop! Hold ijt, -What |n thunder Is the matter with u? >We wiirftave a smash-up if you *' on like this! yer—3Never mind, Pir! I'm tired fe; 4is^ppoJnteel in Ipve—4bis is the " • '" of njy life/jj novel. »f .^'U' A \f9B»aB'f Reason. --<--r .'MtJJMaMisK, Ktiat' s ^ I -, >, i the eieiasive . koyd" ae & trademark fdr/its fSwdeh The s?§6iat iffipcfnahcB tit this aeeisiofa ; consist ifi .the pf6t^ctio« which it assures td thfe Mltdfis of wn* fetimw 1 ! ef ftoyai bftWittg jNw&f ifalttBt, ihterioY and unwholesome CdfttpdUfidS. the excellence of this ant'ele" has eMIed it tb be, highly esteemed and laS*«ly Used ftlffi68t the WdfId 8V6f, It8* high fetatitJard at quality havmg'beefi always maintained, consumers have eOitte to i-ely ito&llcitly tifien the "Rayii'-' brand as th6 molt wholes'ome and'effifcient ot afay ifl the market; ' ¥ he dtipi'dlty of othef manttfacturerg la eiclted'by this high r'etJtttdtlbn. and laf ge dMAnd, Very tew ot the hundreds of baking powder's on the market are safe to Use, If their makers .could sell-them under the name of a well known, reputaftte brand incaU culable damage would tie done to the public health by the deception. The determination of the Royal Baking 3PoWder Company to protect the users of the Royal baking powder against imitators by^& rigid prosecution ot them makes such imitations of its brand extremely rare. • " , , •' "PI|i6 Stories." "There is-one favorite Chicago expression triat,! don't hear in Washington so., oftetii" said a correspondent from the Windy "City to a Post man. "It is 'pipe' stories as synonym for fake or canard or ghost stories. "Where does it come from? , Oh, it came from the West, along with.the Chinese, and I suppose you will get it here when Chinamen and opium joints become more numerous. There are lots of white hop fiends in Chicago. If they get hold of a'green reporter or a green policeman they arc liable to have them chasing all over the universe at dead hours of the night looking for suppositional events and their menda- cinations are known to the police as 'pipe stories' or 'talking pipe.' That is the symbol In Chlcagoese for anything that is without foundation in 1 fact.— Washington Post. ECLIPSES THEM ALL. SB 1-2 Hours, Chicago to Jacksonville, Florida. -The Monon Route, with its customary enterprise, has put on a new fast train that makes the run between Chicago and Jacksonville in SSVa hours. This train is composed of elegant Pullman Perfected Safety Vestibuled, Open and Compartment Sleepers, including Drawing Room and Buffet Sleepers, as well as comfortable day coaches, with Monon Celebrated High-back Seats. This train leaves Chicago daily at 8:32 p. m., arriving at Cincinnati nf«;t morning 7:30, Chattanooga 5:30 p. ST., Atlanta 10:40 p. m., reaching Jackson-' ville at 8:20 the second morning, in ample time to make connection with all lines for points in Central and Southern Florida. This is the fastest time ever made by any line between Chicago and Florida. .„; . ' ' FRANK J. REED, • General Passenger Agent, Chicago. City Ticket Office, 232 Clark st., Chicago. For time cards, pamphlets and all other Information, address L. E. SESSIONS, N. W. Pass. Agt., Minneapolis, Minn. Not on a Dime. Mrs. Kindly—"I'll give you a dime, poor man. But I hope you will not go and get tipsy with it." The Poor Man (much hurt)—"Lady, you do me a great wrong to suggest such a thing." Mrs. Kindly—"I didn't mean to accuse " The Poor Man—"I'm glad of it, lady/ Do I look like a man who could get drunk on a dime?" • Book Vreo to Investors and Speculators In Grain, Provisions and Stocks. One hundred pages of useful information on the markets for past; 33 years will be mailed you on application. Avoid Imckot shops and trade where your order will affect the market, ESTABLISHED 1880, C, (V, \Vbyland & (Jo,, bunkers nntl -lu-pjcers, members, Chicago Board of Triade, fujfK'Sto'ok -Exchange,* 10 and 13 Pacific Ave., 'Cbip^go, Befer to 0, F, Stone, Seo'y Chicago Board of Trade; BlijipiB Trust and Savings Bank, and commercial agencies, , An old maid says that she wishes she as an auctioneer, for then it would be perfectly proper- for her to say; ""Make me an offer," A Singular Form of There IH a class ot people, rational enough to other, respects, wfto are c?rt»Jn!y pjono- WtniacB Ji» dpslpK t)»emsfllves, They are con- Htantly fving experiments upon tlielr stoni- nchs, their bowels, |helr livers and their kidneys yritU trsshy nostrums. When these organs are really out of or4er. if they would onjy use Bosletter's Stom ft oh Bitters, they wpu(4, it not hopelessly insane, percejv? its te fellow I'm' lay)ns fw>" remarfced r the Jien 83 Jw owner C8J»? a pan o m«wp£«i4% 6»t6itnefdl tie* In ft »t «fathfthH*t Q BtatUe in the Mel>. i-o^allt&fi mll'seiltu 6f aft is 1 JK8f6 fa- Miiiaf that 'that 6* cledgatra, by the at6 sculptor, Johh Taylor ston in 1888. la Hawthorne's "the Marble Faim" the work Is attributed td Sculptor Kenydn, IdVer ot the girl Hilda. The story 1 of-the Inspiration of the novel, of the fountain source* of its characters Hilda and Kenyon, and explaining the identity of the statue's hand, is authenticated from.two sources—a favorite pupil of the original Hilda and posthumous papers of her husband. It was during his consulate in Liverpool that Nathaniel Hawthorne planned his memorable visit to Rome. He was solicitous to secure a cultivated young woman to accompany his family and be a governess,to his children. To this end he wrote to his wife's sister, Mrs. tft tttuii ^Oilhf AtrieHtaft'flS ttt We ftitadft !h had Uffie had dene a little filers M It would otter & warthy stibpjeet fa? If gd6d att artist as himself; fMUifes 'fifthly cut Us if alfe-adjf marble 1 , ati ideal ftfi' deeply get e^esl &nd & ffidtith leh anddeHeate," ' , ,. '; ' - f it Was the model at ;Adaliiie herd's h AH d' that Kenyoti took S6 tenderly eut of tha "old'-f&siilijnisd Ivory coftef," o& the 6ccasi6& oT Miriam'* visit to- Hie B-eftietof'a atudtot ""A small; beautifully shape'd hand, delicately sculptured in marble. sueh, laving care and nice art had been lavished here that the palm 'really seemed ,to have a tenderness in its Very" substance. Touching those lovely Angers— had tho jealous Sculptor allowed you to touch —you could hardly believe that virgin warmth would not steal from them Into your' heart." This hand, it is said, guided Story In the modeling of the hand in his famous statue of Cleopatra. Repeated visits to the Metropolitan museum, in whose vestibule the famous statue of Cleopatra confronts the visitor, fail, however, to reveal any resemblance between the delicacy 'of Hilda's hand and the majestic symmetry and strength of the hand of the last of the ftdWt&iitf <. .A^HST *^ftlS»f ^Ifii^ CLEOPATRA—STORY. Horace Mann, who then presided, with her brilliant husband, over the fortunes of Antloch college In Yellow Springs, •Ohio. Among the students of the college's 'tentative days none shone more brilliantly or made deeper Inroads on the affections of the founder and bis wife than the gentle Adaline Shepherd. She was In her senior year when Mrs, Mann proposed that at the completion of the course she should accompany the Haw- thornes to Rome. The girl joined the Hawthornes In Rome, where she continued her studies, drinking in the art life on every side and perfecting herself In modern languages, for which she bad an inherent talent. While not an artist in execution she had singularly delicate artistic per T ceptions, which doubtless suggested to Ptolmies. Did Hawthorne foresee the fate in store for the original Hilda' when he made Miriam say to Kenyon, "There is certainly a providence or purpose for Hilda, if for no other human creature." In time, true to her promise, Adaline returned to her native land and wedded the lover of her girlhood,' Shortly after their marriage the husband became professor of rhetoric, while the wife tilled the chair of modern languages at 'Antioch college, Then a shadow fell. He became subject to epileptic fits. The wife opened a school in Boston. The combined cares,of school and nursery begat} to tel}. at length on the delicate organization, In 'her blood was a taiftt of insanity, This thought preyed upon her weakened condition. One night she slipped away and committed su)<?}de by leaping Into the Sound from a Providence lino steamer. ft Sh6 is of 6 IdvAblS tiispbMtldfl &nd th'd light 6f thaiseial net ia ^hiah ifiti j«6VM • Ft* tm ysa« altt fa&i feeeh s »tek flfi f^Hi « _ fwSWSi'fid — »96ftiFt¥«*felltf»lBf Iutef8iirat~a«d5uflt~f' ^Instead of ittpw?rnf Under thd .tare, of »y t t>hjriia«t iibeea»B .wane,, rot Itr WeeksIwasiuiiabletdget but bf;bed,and jLUAttL kftf * Jt^AlAJtl* *A«fcl4 .i**»A4Kittt)lf ^T - *M Jtfa^f>J *I*DOuu SIX O viOCK O&Otl XDOPHlXiK *JL SUnBroCl* hdfrlbly. ' % lljSS WofS Bpf6 and tfem th6 iil&rkS of ffif t^eth, f(it 1ft fhy effoMS W kesp from gcroitoihg: 1 stitik tay feeih deep inte toy Hp«. At such times I Killed find tossdduritil the bed shddk llkeatranpeii l«ftf ttndjt-fluftlly,«)t i*d,66WoU8-*thlit. the dooWr—1 won't uli MU hl^flatte-i«av6 we Mine ttoff>hltt& pill* to take, • The Very thought of them n6W ffilkeft me-shiver. These morphine pills simply put me Id sleep forftwhild and when i became con&oioua, ftgaift my Agony was renewed. "The pftln in toy stomach and back was more than I could stand. 'Your blood is boor, 1 said the doctor, 'take sulphur and mr> lute*, 1 and I did until it was a great -iron' der thtt I was not a molasses dike. It was time waated in taking it because I Was not benefited'in the least) my suffering con- -thiued,,but by.t mighty effort.after being In , bed,io long;- Iffrot;up< '_, Ohj' buf IjWas' a, sad .night then. Fromlia poUtifls 'J;had ^fallen to ninety; my cheeks W-oro pale and sunken and I limped j yes, actually hobbled from the extreme pain in my aide.. Then I tread of t>r. < WiUiams < Pink Fills for Pale People and the testimonial* in the News inspired mo, with hope, I got the pills, and took them, Before many days I began to Improve and before I had finished one box I felt as If I could go out and walk for miles, I soon stopped limping and through the Pink Pills I soon bid goodbye to my head* aoh.es while tho pain in my i stomach 1 and back slowly but- surely succumbed to the influence of these pills that soem to be abla to persuade all pain to leave one's body, Now I am as I used to bo; well and strong, lighthoartod and merry but never without the pills. ' See I have got some of them bow," and from a nearby desk she handed out one of the boxes. • Dr. Williams' Pink Pills contain, Jn a con-' doused form, all tho olements necessary to give new life and richness to the blood and restore shattered nerves. They are also a 1 specific for troubles peculiar to females, such as suppressions, irregularities, and all forma of weakness. They build up the blood, and restore the glow of health to pale and sallow cheeks. In men they effect a radical cure in all cases arising from mental worry, over-work, or excesses of whatever nature. Pink Pills are sold in boxes (never in-loose bulk).at 60 cents a box or six boxes for $2,60, and may, bo had of all druggists, or direct by mall from Dr. Williams Medicine Company. Schenectadv. K. Y. '^^f~^»l 1 "^»I' •*•;, t^ • w iyjMp&jmi l^fwHhl phosphites. tlon, If takcnln"; timS^lil good, In :the beg'lnnJn^stagefl they Improve the appetitej'prBf mote >"dl|estlo v rbana fJdti&ifuif the nervous'sysfelffi,; ( ;M| ! tr|ef lack ,,the,' peculiar Mejiidlnii properties,, and the;i fat,tfofiiSL In'cockliver. oil, ; , The, ittflftfa phosphites, 'are • yaluable- r aridi *4 **» iM'o.'-f. I -iljAil^Al. t-ttjriW the cod-liver Now Acquisition* of British Among curipsities lately the ,33ritish museum the first place is -due to some 1 very remwk^bie acquisitions epnneoted. with ChwJes j (1 , one l^eing a, copy of the secret; instructions to the commissioners appointed fop rising a foroed loan Jn 1§3?, ' Na other printed copy is at prepent' Known to exist a,nd -Mr, aarfllner, while writing his, history pf the time', was obliged tp ; refer to » manHsorJpt In.tne state paper ^ Interest pf this cppy }s njuc^ by v ita,,.b,ej»S addresse j o? . Npttf ngftam, - wbers t9 JN.bearing, Hie the pn the , Kntlro and Porfoct. : Gosslppy.(brimming with a secret)— Tom, ,can I take you apart for a minute? Wiggins—Sorry, my dear fellow; but not having 1 artificial limbs, I'm compelled constantly to pose 'for the altogether!—New York World. " A Clip of Parks' Tea at night moves the bowels in tho morning." ' i H The culture ot silk promises to be-an important industry in Oregon. . phosphites, 1 ! these ''- gested'. " Sensitive' 0 ,' • ,, can bear an, emul the -raw oil cannot b'e . As the hypqphos'phit 1 e's^«!,th'^\ medicinal 'agents 1 In-thev ; pl .andthe fat'Itself',are ' why, not haye ' all?- • This 'co stood "the 'test of T tV ( enty',iyeaja and has never i 'been"equaUe f dl > . , ' SCOTT'S BMyLSION'S-^'fjill ' ' - tus been endorsed by the medical professton'for twenty^ veirs. (Atk your doctor.) This ii because H Isalwiyt,! talalatle—»\v/nys vnjform— «1 Ways tontaini tb»'ptintt& Vorwgian C»J-livi r Oil and HffMoipkfln^^^m , -Insist on Scotfi EraUlilon wUh'tUjdc-mirk.rfl manandnsh. I). ,f,^l> •:.^V'-.'W.V.'M'iffi Put up In 50 cent and f i.oo il:«s,'. : The smiltstw.y' may be ehough to cure your .cough or lielp'your t--*— ^ \ answerlhg mention .thip paper. quick, ( ConsumpfiQJnV^'MrV ~ ~ ~>ABJ^INQ> "Beavw N^Y.>Jttn^l9/^|J Where All Else FsHs. Timely The great success of the chocolate the house of Walter Baker & -Cp;;,,(es^ak jn,1780) .has'leclitp the f placing i many, misleading and ;o,f their, name, labels,' a,nd Baker & Po.'are facturers pf tactyrers PT p^re an<?i nij^nrgri|Qe ^^gj^fM phocplatf? pn th^s cpnti^nt-, Np, cljeng(c"iil|f|| used in4h«ir nianufaQtyrei % ? <5 i}>>.->'S]titf$$$>$

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