The Circleville Herald from Circleville, Ohio on August 3, 1950 · Page 13
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The Circleville Herald from Circleville, Ohio · Page 13

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Circleville, Ohio
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Thursday, August 3, 1950
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Page 13
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# li Thursday, August 3, 1950 THE DAILY HERALD — C1RCLEVILLE, OHIO t> Lemon Paces Indians To Vital Win IS (its Shut Out; Yanks Fall A#ain NEW YORK, Aug. 3—It used to be a fellow named Feller who immediately came to mind when one spoke of the Cleveland Indians. Thi magic word today unquestionably is, Lemon. Whether it’s necessary to go so far as calling him Robert II, isn’t important. Lemon is doing his hit toward gaining the distinction of being the best major league pitcher of the year. His record of 17 wins and four losses places him right at the front of the class. The converted infielder-outfielder has w’on nine games in a row, carrying the Tribe into the thick of the American League pennant struggle, three percentage points out of second place and two games away from first. Bob & a shoo-i# to hit the charmed 20-game ciicle for the third straight season and should better his 22-game total of last season without any difficulty. The 29-year-old Californian, who also can do some fancy hitting added his seventeenth win to his collection last night as he blanked the Washington Senators, 11 to 0, with a brilliant thre^-hitter. The right-handed ace was aided by five homers, one his own. • • • LARRY' DOBY’, another important cog in Lou Boudreau's Cleveland machine, bashed out three consecutive homers, his 12th, 13th, and 14th to drive in five runs. The speedy center- fielder who went three-for-four, took over the American League batting leadership with a mark of .350. Lemon chipped in with a three-run homer and Joe Gordon contributed to the 13-hit assault with a fbur-bagger with the bases empty. Things looked dismal for the New York Yankees, who took it on the chin for the second straight time from one of Red Rolfe’s bullpen commandos. The Detroit manager called on Hal White, 31-year-old righthan­ der used mainly for relief work, and White came through with a 4 to 0, two-hit shutout win over the world chaqnpions. The best the Yankees could do was a single by Gene Woodling and another by Johnny Mize. And only one Bomber reached second base. To make matters worse, it was White who banged home the Tigers’ first run off Allie Reynolds in the second inning with a single. White’s third win of the campaign, his first achieved in a route-going perfor m a n c c, raised the Bengali to two games ahead of the Y'ankees. Boston's Red Sox scored three times *n the ninth inning to edge the St Louis Browns, 9 to 8 A1 Zarilla homered for the Sox, and Don Lenhardt and Ken Wood connected for the Browns. Elmer Valo hit for the cycle as the Philadelphia Athletics stopped the Chicago White Sox, 10 to 3. Valo collected a homer, triple, double and single. Eddie Robinson accounted for all Chicago’s runs off Carl Scheib with a homer in the first inning. Bubba Church is the young man Eddie Sawyer hopes can fill the gap for Army-bound Curt iiiiniimniituuwHiiiiiiiuiiiiiHiimniiiiiiifiMiiiiwNiwHniiii County Fair Race Results itiaimiiniiuuiHiHiiiititiiiniHiiiritiniinitiiuntmHiiiiHMHHi 3 40 2 so «20 3 20 26 Cl*** Trot—$500 Rilly Stone (Short . ................. 1 Wyn Vibart (Butterworth) ......... 2 Juan Direct (Brandt» 3 Thunder Comet (Lanum) ........... 5 V E. Signal (Beatty) ................... 4 Johnny Forbes (Fuller) ............... « Varlev Scott (Shilling) ................. 7 Frisco Morris (Myerai ............. 8 Little Jake (Allen) . 9 Times: 1 09 3-5. 2 19; 1:10, 2:18 Mutuels, first heat: Billy Stone .................. 4 20 2 40 Wyn Vibart ...................... 4.00 Juan Direct .................... Second heat Billy Stone .............. ,,.T. 3 20 2.20 Wyn Vtbart .......................... 2.20 Juan Direct t-Year-Old Trot—1500 Connie Lois Volo (Edwards) Mary I,ee Song (Huber Jr.) . Ethel Key (Debolt i ................. Bele Prone <Casey> ... Juna'a Girl (Zimmerman) .. George Van (Shlllingi ......... Time»: 1:09 4-5. 2:15 4-5; 1:10 2-5. 2:1« 2 5. Mutuels, first heat: Mary Lee Song ............. 6 00 Connie Ix>la Volo ......... Belle Prone ................. Second heat: Connie Lola Volo 7.00 Ethel Key ................... Belle Prone ......... Dally Double—4.20 Free-for-AI Pace—*1500 Peggv Mite (Drum» ... Belwin Bunter (Huber Jr.) .. Linda B (Casey) ........... J. W Stone (Seabrook) ......... Josedale Main (Huber) ......... Donna June (Snyder) Dorothy Mac Spencer (Butt) Times 1 02 . 2 05 3-5: 1:05, 1:05 2-5, 208 3-5. Mutuels, first heat Pegav M:te ........... Belwin Bunter ........ Linda B ...................... Second heat: Pf-gy Mite ...................... 6 80 10 40 Beiwtn Bunter 4 40 Linda B ............. f ree for-All Trot —*506 Shandon (Shilling» Sheraton »Butterworth) ... Little Pat W »Huber Jr ) Miss Traffic Officer (Coder) Rosie Hal (Carpenter) . .. Abbe M Volo »Pearson) . Robert Direct (Casev) Time«: 1:04 1 5. 2 07; 1 04 1- Mutuels, first heat: Shandon ................ 4 00 Sheraton ........................ Little Pat W ................... Second heat Sheraton ........ Shandon ... Mis* Traffic Officer . 1 2 3 4 7 5 •6 8 dr 2 20 2 20 2 20 2 20 2 20 3.60 1 4 2 3 5 dr 2 60 2 40 2 60 2 60 3 00 Page Thirteen Crossword Puzzle mm 1 2 3 4 5 7 6 2 08 2-5 2 60 1 1 2 2 3 3 44 7 5 i 5 6 ! 6dr j 7 60 10 60 6 80 5 no 2 20 5.00 2 00 2 20 ACROSS 1. Stylish 5. Cruat on a sore 9. Famous mission (Tex.) 10. Written in code 12. To make dim 13. Science (humorous) 14. Solemn wonder 15. Bill of fare 17. Selenium (abbr.) 18. Adorns with gems 20. Season of the year 23. Coffin 2«. Unit of weight 27. Girl's nickname 28. British protectorate (Arab.) 29. Pet name for an aunt 30. Swing loosely 32. Exclamation 34. Not hot 35. Distress signal 38. Flaw 40. A shade of green 42. Friction match 43. Expressed juice of apples 44. Minus 45. Sharp DOWN 1. Hint 2. Angle made by a fault vein 3. Measure 4. Praise 5. Scotch tea cake «. Flower 7. Fuss 8. Pleads 9. Sleeveless garment (Arab.) 11. Color, as cloth 16. Ovum (Biol.) 18. Cases for ship’s compasses 19. Deposit of fine earth 20. Resort 21. Seed vessel 22. Regretted 24. High priest 25. Cereal grain 27. Refuse of a mine 29. Past 31. Memoranda 32. Away 33. Drag 35. Binding line of a surface U MME1HU laura yam un DiRiJUMIlUa OH UliCHflMUH UUM U [RDM 14 11L1UUM UF.vj LlfiMHBD no nnm rcnnu OCJML1H UMIlfJi Haayu GJMISlIfc I) Yesterdfy’s Aaawer 36. Baking chamber 37. Varying weight (Ind.) 39. Employ 41. Falsehood véi 1 2 I I t i r* m 9 Ù 10 h 11 il 4 i iC 14 ¡7 V/A % % rt I 20 2J 22 m 23 24 25 H> I 27 218 I m YY< 30 31 m i a h ///> bA I 35 3 h 37 U 39 40 A4 42 É 43 i 44 ¡w 45 % 0-3 2 20 l 2 21 .. 3 6 .. 73 .. 4 4 6 5 5 7 2:07 3 5 2 802 20 2 8 3 40 2 60 2 80 3 40 2 202 20 2 20 Pro Football’s Hall Of Fame Is Announced Simmons with the pennant-hun. | Helms Hall of Fame. gry Philadelphia Phillies. Church gave an indica t i o n last night that he may very well do. The rookie right hander pitched the Phillies to a S1? game National League lead with tion next Wednesday a three-hit, 2 to 0. shutout over the Cincinnati Reds for his fifth win in six decisions. STANDINGS National League Philadelphia ............... 60 Brooklyn ............... 53 Boston ........... 54 St. Louis ........ 54 LOS ANGELES, Aug. 3_Jim ,J00rk ;;;;;;;;;;;; J] Thorpe, Red Grange and 23 oth- Cincinnati ......................... 39 , , , Plttaburgh ............ 34 ers Of the greatest professional American League Team Won Detroit New York Cleveland . Boaton „ , , , Washington The Helms board, composed of Chicago editors of metropolitan Los Angeles newspapers, made the selections. Recordings of their achievements will be enshrined by the Helms Athletic Founda- \ ™ football players of all time have been chosen for entry into tHfe 61 60 61 56 44 39 35 34 40 40 41 42 47 35 57 62 0 3 * ; 3'; 4 10 16 19 24 34 37 38 43 51 61 63 63 HF. SINGLED home the winning run in the fourth inning and Del Ennis accounted for the other with his 24th round-tripper. Brooklyn moved into second ' place with a ten-inning, 5 to 4. victory for Ralph Branca over the Pittsburgh Pirates. Jim Russell’s two-out single with the bases loaded scored the winning j marker. This same Mr. Russell had ; wiped out Ralph Kiner’s 29th homer in the ninth inning with a blow of his own in the bottom half to bring about the overtime. I Johnny Sain won his fifteenth as he hurled the Boston Braves to a 4 to 3 victory over the St. Louis Cardinals, dropping the 1 Redbirds to fourth place. Walker Cooper’s pinch-hit single scored the winning run in the I eighth. The New’ York Giants won their eleventh game in 12 starts with an 11 to 1, 8 to 6, double sw-’eep over the Chicago Cubs. Larry Jansenn won his twelfth game w’ith a five-hitter in the opener. The Giants won the nightcap despite three homers by Andy Pafko which produced five runs for the Cubs. Pafko now has 24 circ uit clouts for the season. See the Motorcycle Races 9 Thrilling Events HILLY' HUBER—Reading, Pa. Recognised throughout the country for his eonsistant racing prowess, Huber won the 10 Mile National Dirt Track Co-Championship at Atlanta, Ga., in 1948. —A* The— PICKAWAY COUNTY FAIR FRIDAY, AUG. 4, 2 p. in. The 25 grid greats chosen by the board were: Cliff Battles. Boston and Washington, 1932-1937. Sammy Baugh, now in 14th season w’ith Washington Redskins. Joe F. Carr (deceased), first president of the National League, 1921-1939. Earl (Dutch) Clark, Portsmouth and Detroit. John (Paddy) Driscoll, Chicago Cards and Bears, 1921-1928. Glenn Edwards, Boston and Washington, 1932-1949. Ray Flaherty. New York Yankees and Giants, Washington, 1936-42. Danny Fortmann, Chicago, 1936-1942. Harold (Red) Grange, New York and Chicago, 1926-1927, 1928-1935. George Halas, Chicago Bears player and coach since 1921. Mel Hein, New York Giants, Los Angeles Dons and Rams, 1932-1950. William Hewitt, Bears, 1933-1937. Clarke Hinkle, Packers, 1932-1941, Robert (Cal) Hubbard, Giants and Packers, 1927-1936. Don Hutson, 11 seasons for Packers, greatest end and scorer of them all. Earl (Curly) Lambeau, Packers coach 1921-1949, now coach Chicago Cardinals. Tuffy Leemans, New York Giants, 1936-1943. Sick Luckman, Chicago Bears T-formation quarterback. Bronco Nagurski, C h i c a go Bears for nine seasons. Ernie Nevers, Duluth, Chicago Cards, developed pro ball on v est coast. Steve Owen, coach of New York Giants since 1931. Ken Strong, New York Giants. Joe Stydahar, Chicago Bears and Los Angeles Rams, 19361950. Jin. Thorpe, Canton Bulldogs. George Trafton, center for Chicago Bears for 13 years. 46 47 47 49 61 63 65 65 WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS National League Philadelphia. 2: Cincinnati. 0. Boston. 4; St Louis, 3. Brooklyn. 5; Pittsburgh, 4. New York. 11; Chicago, 1 (1st). New York, 8; Chicago, 6 »2nd). American League Detroit, 4; New York, 0. t Philadelphia, 16: Chicago. 3. Cleveland 11 Washington, 0. Boston. 9; St Louis, 8. American Association Milwaukee. 3: Columbus, 0. Kansas City, 1; Toledo, 0 St Paul. 3; Indianapolis. 2 Minneapolis, 7; Louisville, 6. GAMES THURSDAY National League St. Louis at Boston. Pittsburgh at Brookhn. (Only games scheduled L American League Philadelphia at Chicago. New York at Detroit. (Only games scheduled» American Association Columbus at Milwaukee (n>. Toledo at Kansas City (n). Indianapolis at St. Paul (n». Louisville at Minneapolis (n). GAMES FRIDAY National League Chicago at Boston (n). Cincinnati at Brooklyn (ro, i Pittsburgh.at New York (n>. Chicago St. Louis at Philadelphia <n . American League Boston at Chicago in). Green Bay Philadelphia at St. Louis (n). Washington at Detroit <m. New York at Cleveland (n> American Association Toledo at Kansas City in». Louisville at St Paul <n). Indianapolis at Minneapolis (n> (Only games cheduled). Baseball Results Lost GB 0 2 2 7 17 24». 27»; 28 Philadelphia ........ St. Louis ............. American Association Team Won Lost GB Indianapolis ...................... 64 Louisville .......................... 65 Minneapolis ........................ 59 St. Paul .............................. 59 Columbus ............................. 56 Milwaukee .......................... 45 Toledo 45 Kansas City* ...................... 40 0 0 3 4 6*i 18 19 21 * a John Le Scores Upset Victory Bearden Hoping For (lomcbaek 'Iitli Senators CLEVELAND, Aug. 3—Lanky, good-looking Gene Bearden, ; Cleveland’s man of the year in the Indians’ 1948 American i League pennant drive, is g><ing to start all over again with the Washington Senators. The knuckle balling southpaw was sent by the Indians to Washington yesterday for the *10,000 waiver price. Washington Manager Bucky Harris promised Bearden he would get plenty of work with the fifth place Nats. “He may take some tune to come around again, but we’re CHICAGO, Aug. 3 — John Lee scored an upset victory in the first division and favored Mark * to wor^ right along with Hanna came back to take the *um’ ^arris said. second heat of the $5,000 divided Ankabar Acres Pacing Stake last night at Sportsman’s Park in Chicago. John Lee finished the mile in 2:05 4-5 with Bay Prince second and Mark Hanna third. In the second heat at a mile and a sixteenth, Mark Hanna I moved up to first. Victory Grattan was second and Bay Prince slipped to third. The winner’s time was 2:15. DEAD STOCK COWS ................................................... 93.M HORSES .................................................. 92.50 Collect 970 CtrelavUlo Div. 1 1 Inland Products, tea. •mall Stock Removed Promptly Circlevill« Fertiliser Bearden, who said he is going to try to regain the brilliant form of two seasons ago, conferred with Cleveland General Manager Hank Greenberg about a cash settlement before he left the team. Greenberg, however, said that Bearden wanted to pitch regularly and asked to be sent to a team where he would get more work. “He didn’t rate any bonus on his work for us this year,” Greenberg said. After his 20 victory 1948 season, including the historic playoff game in Boston and a World Series victory, Bearden dropped back lasi season ana nasn I oeen the same pitcher since. - l\/l\(vV'HERE ARE f / VOLJ OO’NO I L<^*X \ \\ iTH vOwî \..H "APiGGy QANKSfj U E PEEL SO SOR-îv FQS ' L\CA DONALD WAV V3 S SLAVED ANKLE.Wgfcl /iv ßnAii ~r‘ va,» .v NONSENSE.' BLV HIAA SOWBTWiNG WE NEEDS... /...AND v\Av' VVE WAVE IT V WHEN VOUR ANKLE'S WELL? M U G G S T I L L I E E T T A K E T T B R A D F O R D ow, yes, T those are sweet MARV E V . .7) \NOCOS, PUMPKIN I I LOVE AND ITS GOING VOU / A TO TAKE A BIGGER PIECE OF STEEL THAN THAT KNIFE TO PIN THIS MURDER ON ME. Scott's Scrap Book By R. J. Scoli Room anil Board I TOLD A FELLA SELUN PEANUTS at pa ball PARK ABOUT VER. OFFICE HAND FANS - HE SAID DEV SOUND GREAT, AN’ TUH BRING SOME OVER AN’ MED TRY SELLIN' EM/ 111 COLONY WILL PoUINAft Soo,ÛÛO.OOO FlOWiR* IN k SEASON. By Gene Ahern uM, aw I was T hinking it over , junior , and THE IDEA IS TOO BIG TO BE HANDLED ON a local, basis / I' m putting OFF THE PROJECT UNTIL j NEKT SPRING an © TwEN 1 GO INTO PRODUCTION n TO SELL THE FANS ON A NATIONAL SCALE/ (ill SlAToN'ftt I l IP h A h ÎS heap H CLIMBING UP *ii dRUM< . v C v-V EARL MIL- BELIEVE HIM * — *»L«* w

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