The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on June 19, 1895 · Page 7
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 7

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Algona, Iowa
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Wednesday, June 19, 1895
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Hg3£B8^J^% tt * ai « wt KP' enaolM tfce liEli^A^'Wwte ftfgo, ,a6d cfflfhbttieg the to feat. (lfi Bostofl )- Slt « »* Waiter— Cian't Serve Sir, BttaBfef r -tJin-4rfifig infe a plate of Sflgar, one lemon . fttid , ^ A tine Awaits Investors in wheat wbd buy now, as wheat la at the present t>fiee a splendid ' ,, L,,, . tip to *1,44. Wheat *lll sbon be *1, You eattsbeeulate through the reliable coMmis* Slgtt ndiisS of Thomas & Co., ftialttt Bldg., S&W' HK P hl * , 8fllttU margin required. write to that flrtn for manual oh successful sbedvilattoa afad Daily Market Report. One Thing Settled. ' Bamtny-r-ljere'8 toy new cart. Ain't fihe a beiuty? Tommy—You musn't say "she." A cart's "It." Sammy—Tam't. It's "she." tommy.-I'll leave it to Dick. Dick (inspecting It)— Tam't either one. It's "he." It's a to all cart. I Proved Ills Ignorance. Jinks— I understand you were pretty well off before you Avere married. Blinks—Yes, hut I didn't know it. • KNOWLEDGE. ^Brings comfort and improvement and .te,n'ds to personal enjoyment when ! rightly used. The many, AVho live bet| ter than others and enjoy life more, \vith , less expenditure, by more promptly adapting the. world's best products to i the needs of physical being, will attest the value to nealth of the pure liquid laxative principles embraced in the remedy, Syrup of Figs. j Its excellence is due to its presenting in the form most acceptable and pleasant to the taste, the refreshing and truly beneficial, properties of a perfect laxative ; effectually cleansing the system, dispelling colds, headaches and fevers and permanently curing constipation. It has given satisfaction to millions and. met with the approval of the medical . profession, because it acts on tjhe Kidneys, Liver and Bowels Avithout weakening them and it is perfectly free from every objectionable substance. Syrup of Figs is for sale by all druggists in 50c and $1 bottles, but it is manufactured by the California Fig Syrup Co. only, whose name is printed on every package, also the name, Syrup of Figs, and being well informed, you will not "accept any substitute if offered. You aeo them' everywhere. P lumbia i i \ COLUMBUS are the product of the oldest . , rf r, ,and best equipped,bicycle factory in America, and are the result of eighteen years of successful striving to make the best bicycles in the i .world. 1$95 Columbias are lighter, stronger,, handsomer, more graceful ; thai! ever—ideal machines for the use of j those who desire the best that's made, 1 HARTFORD PICYCLES; cost less—$80,' ; $60. They are the equal of many other i higher-priced makes, though. POPE MFQ- CO. General Office* opd Factories, HAHTPPRD. ~ BOBTON, NKW route, CHICAGO, •AN FHANCIBQO, FHQVIO«NO«, telling e* Poft CoJum- >.b|»8, and ,H«ttford8i A t»ge»cy, or ujr {nail lor t'Bt&raps, DAVIS CREAM SEPARATORS 09964994 Separator, F^U C9<*«, f«4 oimw Rower ' Cheap and ,Ooo(i Complete jfftJry Jn U?»lf ANTED. PAVI§ & RANKIN , Eyftintniitlpfl »«4 .AiJvfce de to Paten toyepttpn." Send for*.'Inventor*' QuWeTor I Mtfpi rtxmvfwmi wAstom's.! A dlinpldd bfttty. hfc Scarce 1 yea* old* s Of daWh-staf Ulster* if, Of corn-silk SCeii » Last In a coffin With daisies filled. Small Talc month was smiling, - 'eet Were strangely stilled, Seal-oil! The sad earth '>Ve.«. •Search! , The glnd sky tk'<ntftli x>st! ' * JRcncttlh the clover Ainhl the blue. >np! Ye heart of mothers; lUlh The long years' round; .tear God's Last Day chorus"Found! All children found!" A DUOLOGUE. (In the shape of two letters; the flrst rtTltten by a handsome, attractive nan of the world, born in Uehmonrt, Va., in 1850, but from childhood a •osklent of New York; the second let- er, written in reply to the first, by a \ew York Avomaii, born somewhere about 1804, charming^ lovely and mar•led—but unhappily.) New York, Fob. lio, 1804.—Oh, My Dear, Dear Mrs. Peggy: Haven't you •calized why. you haven't 1 seen me hese last three days? It is because 1 lave seen 110 one and nothing: but you! There, It IB put! And unless your AVO- nau's Instinct has been very much i-mayhig (I couldn't say Avool-gather- iig apropos of it), you must have'seen md known days, Aveeks ago. I've tried to go iiAvay. I've 'chosen ever so many routes, gone several lines to the' station, and twice CA'eu bought a ticket; but Avhile what we x>or fools call our better judgment' dragged my very mortal body; away 'rom toAvn, my heart full of love—and leavy, because "I; feel ypii 'Will say for you to receive, or ut any rate to •eturi). that love, Avculd be Avrong—my ieart.(God bless It!) held me back fast, hi the ,place Avhero you see the uu shine and.the'moon rise. Cau you make head or tall of me, my darling Airs. Peggy? -which-of course I must not call yon unless you grant mo per-: ulssion; will you? But tp go back no further than yes-' :erday: I ;i . had been ouly\ two days lAvay'from-you, 'yet haying sAvqrii to myself the night before'that I Ayould not go to see you In the morning; I loiind I couldn't sleep at all, beeau.se 1 md.nothing to AA'ake up for. And then what .a day! As if It .Weren't 'enough :o have you in my heart, I had .you '011 the brain,'" .too, EveryAvhere I went'' I saAy only Mrs. Peggy, and myriads of .her!'.'' Think, of -myriads of Mrs. Pe^gys, Avlieu there Is : really only one in the' AA'hole Aylde Avorld, only could be one, and she, besides, is more ;hun two-thirds' heavenly.: AVhen I boarded a street car it seemed to me that Mrs. Peggy rang the bell, and inside there were roAVS and roAVS of her, and.every, strap had another man than nie 'hanging on it all dOAvn the aisle.- Hvcu at lunch • she Avas with me, |he 3arte dir Juror .was. a la Peggy. And all my business letters Avere sigiied Avlth her name, big and'A'anlshlng. Every store I passed on BroadAvay belonged to you,-and Sarouy had no one else pictured In his AViiidOAA'S. The A'lolets the men sold on Tvrenty-thlrd street smiled like your eyes, and lily-, of-the-valley tears hung sympathetically fgr me beside them. ' I couldn't stand it any longer! I glanced up at the Fifth Aveuue hotel clock—It Avas Mrs. Peggy minutes past Mrs. Peggy! and I came on here to my club to make a fool or a beast—or Avhat?—of myself, I haven't been able, apparently, to make my declarations seriously! That Is because of two reasons; flrst, I didn't Avant to frighten you, or anger you, or have you laugh, at me, either; I thought It AVIIS safer to Invite you to, laugh with me; and second, I AVUS afraid you might be less likely to believe a serious declaration from me, AVC have been on such jolly, joky ternis, you and I (I love even to Avrlte those three Avords together, and I would like to join them Avjth an everjas,tlng adamantine Jittle chain of hearts, Avhlch I aw atrald is Avofully silly for a great strong man AVho once liad a beard to say.) Perhaps you Avlll be angry Avlth this letter, anyAvay, but I have honestly tried to take as feAv liberties as possible, and though some of the adjectives are ft trifle more cordial than usual, still I continue calling yoq f'Mrs./'even Avheia J haye tp put it In afterwards with, /i carat, for a Avitness! But I shall stop all that—yes,'I must; }t is all too trivial. Besides it Is beating nronnd the bush, I would rather beat against the bars. .The fftcts, are these—you are not happy. There Js • no love Jost—evev to be fou.nd-'-betAVpen yon and your hus' band; this I flare t,Q wlt# because you, • • ' boniaa't V at least' tell .yW .that jtA'e you? , It Js^ a necessity say It, w I anftlj go mud. A • joshed so lopg ipto silent i. see yflu starving of a»y loya for nilne^. And., Gqd Uelp "" ----- ftjju/fcwua, ,tr ' yojj .choose wimjpg -J^B . yomv j?ar§, m,y then,, if, it, y,o\J wafl <J»ee» to PO»W is 'Vto r _ v .._ fflH r«>hiefnt«;t-Jio«- M I A^fts the tvholfc nft^riHJOn. t i-ecail two tlhfeft thnt ybn wHhdrow rout nartitig lIHtf- slippprS filrthor lift ok tm- def yofti' skiri. calfliing iuy satyf fyo tfptJft fhom, This in only a silly tils- tall, bill 1 m(*au t)jr It—t lind to Stay ftWfiy those tlm-e flnys for which yoli repfoftch me. Send Me' soinp WoltlJ Ate yoii angry Atlth me? AVill J-oti ever gpeftk to me again? Or are yolU only dlsflpiwilited with me. which Would be Averse! Of Uo you—t cnh't 'heljj it. 1 inust AVfite It, niid for Oort's sake ansAA-er It—do you love mo? -Jack. November 29. 1804.—Gear Jack: No, f nln hot aiigry with yott, and t Will speak to you the next time you give nie a stliid chattel-—nhd—1 doH't love yoti. (Here there is something scratched otit, Which by holding to the light ohe ertii road.) 1 Avill confess tliftt If 1 Were not—(there tho sentence Avas broken and tho pen run across it several times! tile lottor continues) —I think how I've nnswerod your principal questions, nnd 1 Will tell you just AVhat hnpppetied Avhon 1 received yoti'r letter. First — Dick brought It to me. young Pick, 1 mean, four years old to-tiny—didn't you just n little forget him? "Oh." 1 said, as 1 took the envelope, "here's a letter from Uncle Dick!" "Now AVe'll know what's become of him all this tiuio" "Hully Uncle Jack!" nnsAvorcd Dfck. (I think tho adjective AA'as one of your many presents to him.) How iiliout, that "Uncle?" Do yon waitt to throw juvay all right to that,'mlr.pted title? /Mid don't you Avnnt to keep''the adjective, too, till you're an old man,, and Dickie's your jigo IIO'AV! Well. 1 opened the letter to road it, bill: before 1 had finished Some one came into the room, and for the flrst time in my life I had a letter in my hands 1 was ashamed of and AVished to hide. As soon as I AA'as alone I redd it over again, aud tried to laugh anil thlukjt AVOS a joke, and almost looked for.'• a calendar to. see if it wasn't somehow or other the first of April. Thou 1 iiiid a cup of tea, sent AvprcTthat 1 Avas to be denied to everybody, and read your letter for the third time. Then I did laugh honestly, but cried, too, and having finished Avith a satisfactory fit of hysterics, I felt better, and cleared out aud arrauged my dressing-table dvaAVors. Theii; I begun to answer you. and this Is the sixth letter I've.-started to Avrite. I don't knoAV If I shall send this or not, which, is silly for me to say,-for 'of course if you don't get it you'll know-1 didn't. ' The trouble is, every one of the live others Avas a lie, and this begins Avith a lie, too, and UOAV I'm going to take It back. I can't help Avhut I've already written, I'm going to tell you he truth UOAV. .. - .-. ..Jack, I do love you. But don't, stop lore; be sure you finish this letter. es,I do love you, God help me! (not 'Jod forgive me, I- don't ask him to orglve me. He knoAA's that I haven't to love you of my OAVH accord, hat- It's been in, spite- of -myself, that •'ve tried with all my strength -of AA'ill lot to love you, , How is .it» I. Avoudeir, hat the only thiiig the mind can't 'ontrol is the'hoart.' It's true; you see- Bvidences of it all about you. Your lest friend turns around and marries he man that bored hereto death in he beginning—and, Oh, dcar-^inay igaiu in the end.) . But to go back,-or rather to go on A'ith AA'hat I liaye'.'tb-Avrlte. .• AVhen, kick's father so far forgot his boy' xnd me as to start'a second homo he dlled my love tor ,him, Avhich had be- 'ore this filled CA'ery nook and crevice of my heart. , Dead, IIOAV that love shriveled up into, nothing! and as time mssed on, making everything Averse ustead of better, I put the-withered' corpse out of my heart and SAvept the ilace and closed it, and A r OAved I Avould teep It .empty and clean. It isn't- jinpty any longer, but you must help me keep it clean. Jack, dear Jack, do you knoAV Avhat it is for a Avoinan—a A'onng AA'oman AVlio.knows-what.-love s, AVho has had it and lost, it, and has seemed to be living only under a mid- light sun ever since—suddenly to find ,ierself Avarmed, Inspired, glorified under the rays of a golden uoonday; all, with this knoAvledge that her ideal Still exists, if she can't attain it that she can be Ipved, Js loved, as she,can love, does love in return? All I can say is, the joy is so gveat it js worth bearing all the pain, the pain that must foJloAV. Think of the loneliness of unloved Avlves! For tho lOA'e of imsband and wife Is the most precious thing in life. It Is the only thing that takes precedence of all others; it is the emperor. Children, leav.e father and mother, Avhen their little fingers big enough for the golden "circle; and -so you see that while 'just JIOAV Dickie is to me the greatest comfort and joy, I cannot honestly say he fills the empty space In my heart, made, for another love than his. In a few short years he, too, Avill flnd the sn mo empty spot In his OAVH heart aud fill it with some good Avonmu's love, I hope. Aud then Avhat a loneliness for me! * * * And yet soniehOAV It is largely the boy that keeps nie-rthat and myself. For In. spite of all ihls loneliness (which I doubt sometimes if many men could jmaglne) which affects me- I couldn't gp away with you, I know, Bnt not trusting wholly Jo my emotions, I should aUvays, a.Jl my life, be ashamed. But not trusting Avholly to my emotions, I have reasoned it out. I have taken up an old visiting list, and there }s Mi's, x—, the first name cVQSsed out. She did }t. Four ago. . ghe spends all her time Ing about Europe; one winter Jn nnotnep in St, Petersburg, ftftd eo, on, gyjmm,eri' people (ire always meeting Jw'-.at AJ S ' or JJumlHH'g, oj? ftpme^ 'where. -$ue inm-ies out $f tfteir slsht, dreading Jo have them cut bevj and tliey say she is beautiful' —--'"-•- anfl haggard; and few 1 -'- v mo*t tmpp"y At-omon ih NP.^ foffc*. Iff* i«S oil frith hof htlslsifrd, t^lifte fhe ivotht, ft-ho whisp'prs that ftti? d^wfrpfl him, \raffljr* >tin1 contits tho hittirg she .rondS with tiiibthor. Ami f Sfopwd to think for a niomont tfvet* atfotnei' name, Mrs, t)-—. of Kiftj'-s6coild Street, J-mt know who 1 moan; I'm fiot stire how irtncii Irpttof hoi' case Is. 1 knew her When t Was n j*trl, too. She was mnrrfeil then, and feeemed tlie happiest and most loveable Atouiaii 111 the world. NOAV she'ft hrtfil, bittot one, Avlth never n klhd word for anybody (only yestotdny T heard shr said of iny Kistei'-ln-law that, she tried so hflt-d to got into society that yon could hoar her climb!) Mrs. D has tnrtde two loveless marriages for her dittlghlors, AVho might havo been ttiinsttnlly chai'iniiig womon, but now ni'o only ooiivohtlounl ones; and for twenty years sho hns sat opposite her hils- baud at the tnblo, gone out with him, lived in his hotiso. entertained his friends, nud novor spoken ohe AA'ohl to him. That liiust bo ftwhlll I AA'alit none of this sort of lives, Jack. 1 must nmko something of mine, but I must have some love, too, some happiness, some pleasure iu It. 1 fool If only Ave wo could be just honest friends!• If only! Can AVC? Can't AVO? 1 knoAV some good, happy Avomon, Avlio look like saints, Avhose husbands are devils, and other AVOilion Avhoso husbands are dovlls and thoir Avlves she-onop, and they look It. Wo always look Avhat. we arc; no amount of mental. cosmottc'S ran keep It out of our faces. Help mo to look 'good and hnppy. (If it's only appoumnces, you know they are a great comfort to Avmneii!) Conic and soo me* soon, just as soon as I mhy have absolute trust In you, and you have It: in yourself. I Avofider If 1 am asking for an Ibsen miracle! —Peggy. •She folded it, reread it, sealed Hand addressed it. Then sho tore it Into a hundred pieces and there Avas no-nii- sAvor.—Clyde Fitch in the Chap Book. "AVAtaClIVG '.EGYPT."-'. A Cui'loiiH So iti I HcllKiotiN CiiMtam In .Southern Geor|JtIii. "You pretend to knoAV enough to come to congress from 'Georgia," retorted the colonel, disgustedly, "and don't knpAv Avhat. 'walking Egypt" is?" .."We'll,' it's a grand InUlau filo procession to \yhich the colored race gives Avny once -ti-year'lu.its t'hiirehes.' They lift up thoir voices In a horrible Avail, -the congregation does, and suddenly a negro jumps up in the aisle. > "Next a Mister jumps up. She places her hands on his shoulders, and there .they, stand -jumping' up and doAvn, stltl'-knood, like ' you've seen sheep Avhen feeling festive. "Usually those two' are a mlsflt—he a small, runty little fellow, she a big, strapping Avench. "The singing moans on. Others got up until the whole congregation is in liro'cossion, 'hands forward resting on the-shoulders in front, like a lot of penitentiary-, people going to dinner. "Keeping a jerky time to the moaning, tho procession, like a long, black centipede, jumps and jerks its Ayay up one'aisle doAvu auotlier," says the AVnshiugton 1'ost, "until their religious fervor has cooled. "That's 'walking Egypt," and I suppose tho rite--was imported from •Guinea 200 years ago." XOTHING HUT, FEE'!'. Allowed on the. .SirtoivnlkM UOAVII fit Atlanta, (»n. They have n-'iiew ordinance in At- lauta, Ga., absolutely forbidding overhanging signs. ••.''-• The shopkeepers don't, like It a bit. The grocers are inclined to sarcasm. They have, in a quiet 'way, had their little revenge and have, incidentally, amused the public in doing so. ' As every one knoAvs, the ordinance is a sweeping one, providing that no signs'Shall hang over the street. This word over has been Interpreted to refer not alone to signs that hang across the street, but over It. This means a Avholesale taking down of signs; The ordinance also prohibits the placing of goods on the street beyond a certain distance for display. I notice, says a writer In the Atlanta Constitution, that some of the merchants have compiled with the JaAV, and one'or tAVO grocers have put up in conspicious places about their places of business sarcastic signs concerning the JICAV laAA'. One of these, printed on yellow piece of board in lamp-black characters read; "This sidewalk for carriages," Other^ read: "See our signs in the cellar." . "Keep off the sidewalk." "Nothing but feet allowed on this sidoAvalk." ' / / ,- ,<r t tia »? s". '**-.. ^i"M u^iiMr" ABSOLUTELY PURE Lixly or Gent. The quick'witted conductor and the finical dude were both on an Ogden aV- emie trailer to a Madison street cable train. The long coated dude was oc* cupylng more than his foir share of room, and as the car filled up the conductor undertook to secure room for another passciijfer. "Move up there, gent," he said. ( Hnt the dude objected to the abbreviated term applied to him. "I say, I'm no gent,"he protested. "Move up a* little, lady, 1 ' responded the conductor promptly. He moved. HouHe Cleaning Times. Many paused before/the hand organ und listened to its rude melody. "There's no place like! home," droned the organ. Tears sprang to the eyes of the man Avith the dusty hat. "There's no place like home." "I hone not," sighed the man, for his thoughts were with the bare, Avet floors and a dinner of cold potato on the top of the sewing machine. Nicotinized Nerves. Men old at thirty. Chewuna smolto, eat IHllo, drink, or vrunt to, all tlio time. Nerves tingle, never satisfied, nothing's beautiful, happiness gone, a tobacco-saturated system tell» the story. There's an easy way out. No-'loBao will hill tho nerve-craving effects for tobacco und make you strong, vigorous, and manly. Hold and guaranteed to cure liy Druggists everywhere. Book, titled "Don't Tolmcco Spit or Smoke Your Life Away'," free. Address Sterling Remedy Co., New York City or'Chlcaao. Things to Make Us Think. Men with no faults are not apt to have many friends. The man AVho falls to honor God In his business cannot worship him In church- V .While parents are after the world the devil gets thoir children. The me st costly thing In this world Is Bin. A poor man hns as much right to his own as a rich one. The real worth of a man consists In I •what he Is worth to his race. Whitewashing a rascal never helps him any on the Inside. Farming by Irrigation. What linve been your profits from your 100 acres uMHJ.Oi) Jnud niter working in hot and com weather, early uuU lute* W uut win tbcy bo oveii if agricultural products aguiu riee in prieer i.et nie vvruo you wliat eouie iiieu huve uuue trom J.U or «J Keren in tuo geuial 'climate of tne Uruna Valley. Xejin, (Jims, i'elt, "Atf Boston Jluadiug, lJuuver, C'oiimiUo, No tree has yet been measured which was tailer than the great eucalyptus in Qipslaud, Australia, which proved to be 450 feet high. J. S. PARKER, Fredonia, N. Y., says:"Shall not call on you for the (100 reward, for I believe Hull's Cutarrh Cure will cure any cuse of catarrh. Was yervliud.' 1 Write him for particulars. Sold liy Druggists, 75p. The scales used in weighing diamonds are so delicately poised that the weight of a single eyelash will turn the balance. For Whooping Cough, Pise's Cure is a successful remedy,'—M. P. DICTEB, 67 Tbroop Aye., Brooklyn, N. Y., Nov. 14, '94. The devil has to work herd for all he get In the home of a praying mother. "Hanson's Magic Corn Salve," Warranted to'cm o or money lefunded. Auk your it for it, Vilee 18 eentt, > The Kind of Bird Site Wag Like. , They came into the restaurant, aftef the theatre. "What will you eat?" asked he. "It doesn't matter," returned she. ' "I never have any appetite. 1 don't eat more than enough to keep a bird alive." , • • Nevertheless, the check was seven 1 dollars and elghtv-flve cents. " '„ "She Avas right," he said to himself, as he borrowed car fare from the wal- ' ter. "She really doesn't eat more than a bird; but the bird she had in mind Vvas ^ an ostrich." • "' **.'' .»** I „. •!!»i to.be' • An Oklahoma Coroner. "Dr. Slade, the coroner,, seems a very enterprisliig man." " Colonel Handy Polk— "EnterpnsinM Yer betl Tell you what he done last summer when the circus was here.' .' One of the curiosities in the side show was an Egyptian.mummy. Slade seiz- , ed the mummy, rounded up a jury, ^ brought in a verdict of "Dead from unknown causes," and charged the county bis regular fee with compound interest from the time of Moses." The devil is most like looks most like a cheep. a lion, when he Foul .breath is a-> discourager of af- < fe'ction. It is al r " ways an indication' of poor health ~ bad digestion. To bad digestion 1 -is ' traceable almost all' human ills. It'is the starting point , of many very serious maladies. Upon the healthy action of the diges- _ tive organs, the blood depends for its richness and purity.' If digestion stops, poisonous matter accumulates and is forced into the blood ' —there is no place else for it to go, The bad breath is a danger signal. Look out for it! If you have it, or ' any other symptom of indigestion, take a bottle or tAyo of Dr. Pierce's Golden Medical Discovery. It will straighten out the trouble, make your blood pure and healthy and full of nu- ' triment for the tissues. ,m Trtdo-Uuk. pj Ijer! ft fttea Ri\y»ys Tl»c Cool? Uletl An elderly cook, Avbo llyed for a Jong time in the service of Q, wealthy octo- genorlan, has ended her dwys In a peculiar manner, The octogenarian, Avho Avas single, lately died, and loft her a handsome }ega.oy, In order to celebrate her accession to fortune the cpojj Avent doAvn to her old master's Avino collar, selected sojne of the finest crns, and drjink herself to death, after a hearty weal in the dining-room. 'f\\ia meriting tho Jegal otflolal \yho had charge of the Avlll found the womuu ly* ing dead on the floor, surrounded Uy '& heap of broken pottles. Jt is suppo's^c] she passed tw\y whUo In dellvluin tre-, tnenev—pads Better t-o J,<en.flp}} Te}e- gvaplj, ypu p '\YttS Ppllyl, \ye tQgetljerj. " 8»y"«fljferT#ay,'^ , ,- FsJrtUflttjjB ISWotUw WBinp ?}'«>* ant, J&wff&T- jpft.ivMjWjg amj 'ggFBUpj ilia cQuvta daol *r«H#, ^SJW^SP "R^P^S-^i^-yir^sfffw-.',-';';.", _'-?? *^v$^m^&&tt$u it yo,u. to on^y saorteji .A Horse Worth Having, is a Horse. Wortli Saving.; wun Quiiin's On your stable shelf yon cap Iftugh at Curbs, Splints, Spavins, Wladpuffs anfl b^nohe3, Proof that yon can't get over is to be had for the ashing. ' PflcQSl,50. Smaller size Sic. lsts, or sent by mail, When answering adve tisements Umdjy inentlon thig paper, Very Latest Styles 9& Cent 1'nttcrn* for IV CPP»«, WIi«>» <U*< Cinippn Below J» »*»«.• Ccur Aaaitioniti f«ii* ~ w, OK to m w w'«f *4«fiwvs> |* wi e ADADirit Qi«^ri

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