The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on June 5, 1895 · Page 6
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 6

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Algona, Iowa
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Wednesday, June 5, 1895
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Page 6
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r ~ u ,,,, r ~ U tea earth, with "all il 6f doat3' r td breathe, perspiring and yhftp gtfiMbHhg at O-fte'S hard lUCk, ^e« teldofflrif e-vef, stop to think iat ffiM Woflc day aftef dfty (iMpfyfflt i;1fi&%ffitt« & the fflfld, with ll Md mif the alif • ia 'the epsa ait .... for a short . j ifi a diver's itiit, a oaisson at aa ,if lookf gettiag a taste ef what it id i.ftnd how it f6elfl, td be eared forev' f grumbling fit theft lot and to thank i'their lucky stars that It has beea or* d 'that they Work oil top of the |i earth. . f he work of a diver, his sensa- itidftB while under watef and his expert* j&aees have often been written about, jhnt those of the air look aad caissoa ^JWorker have not. While he does not tfaee the danger of foaiiag pipes aad , lines, as does the diver, he stays dowa r longer^ gets warmer, aad his great dan- ger'liefl.!^ the stagnation of blood aad paralysis.'resulting from the change of ;, - Mr. B. 0. Rapier of East Cambridge is aa air lock Worker aad talks most ia* ; terestingly. His work was mainly in the . 'air looks ttsed ia building the great Hud- J soa river tunnel. To a reporter he talk- iv ed of borne of the sensations, dangers aad ' experiences. * He Said that, while a man f; '.Working on -the surface of the earth bears up an atmospheric pressure of 15 pounds to the inch, men in the looks 'bear & pressure of from IB.to 50 pounds %of compressed air, according to the fi-; depth. The heaviest pressure ever vrork- j" ed under vras borne by five divers on : i<; the Swedish coast—65 pounds. Four of p; these' died five minutes after coming out. M While ait a..general thing the diver ||-'•;• stands not nearly, that amount of pres- f,: rare and. seldom stays down more than : L two hours, the men in the Hudson river f tunnel stood a pressure of from 45 to 4Q% pounds and worked in four hour '; 'shifts." Some men staid down 20 hours f^~ at a stretch, but did not work all the fj!.' time, and Superintendent Haskins once 'M, staid > down 24 hours. The sensations Y\( t .experienced'are peculiar. When a man i.*r first steps in, there is a tingling in the ^, .'ears and a pain in the head, and when iSC 'he^ talks it is apparently through the !%!' nose. This is caused by the pressure, * > and ! the remedy is to hold the nose, •Dolose the mouth and blow against the i<> ears. This relieves the pain and stops k, ! ~the sensation. .When the pressure is all on, the worker feels all right and experiences no discomfort. Then there is a , , sort'of exhilaration, and a man does :'r! more work in the look than he could do ;' outside. '';.',- ,> Another peculiar thing about the ac'^ . tion of the pressure is that a man may ;v;. have liquor enough aboard when out^ s ' r eide to just make him feel jolly, but *-il r when; he steps into the look he is as |V drunk as a' loon. .The clanger lies in ' , coming out of the pressure into the open ;^- air. -It is then,that a man is apt to suf- f'fer from stagnation of the blood and |> -paralysis, caused by the change of at- I? , .mosphera Besides this a man may be -attacked in the header stomach with severe pains, 'Three out of five oases >, where the head and stomach are attacked reiult fatally. . Another severe malady resulting from :?H' the change is what is called the bends. fj*. This is the air getting in between the g; flesh and the bone. It is extremely pain, ful and so severe that a quart of whisky ^administered in half an hour would not |fj intoxicate the patient. The stagnation ""ji'and paralysis are the worst dangers ,' and 'do the work quickly. Many men have been keeled over by these causes, f^and pot a few die, Old timers at the ^business sometimes get caught, Mr. PRapier himself was twice attacked. ;#Tbe remedy for this paralysis is a quick V return to the air lock. The effect of the Ipressure varies on animals, as is shown :;iby the wules need in the Hudson river tunnpl. Some of these beasts are kept ajt wprk down below for a year, and on bfing brought up are worth 'more than ii^^thpy were taken down, Others ia| bad only been in the works four ; ontl)8 had to be killed. »TJie;men as a general thing do not •emain 9 great many years at the busi- "-" "-'' ~ mar» should nwer work »t 40 yews of age, Cutting a' A tnnpel through wa- «-••„,- - ,^/difflcnIt thing and m^was tijDnght to be impossible, U it was done 1 in the case of the Hud' tsu^l, aad the method, as -, 8apjer, {«T«rv interesting. ? ps tbe tHnnel toad progressed 8trucJf, ( How \g}§ Qf w^w ion. Jt was done in a netting of i ne pf the aoQa was : r i i!i - '-V rT" «» i 111 IT, *&SV!*pj}&& ' fKflB %e to tee iaeubntof the Doting birds were das ta is p. la. .f hut evefliflg, at 6180, a fiheiy chopped egg was piateti be fofo tbem, but they showed iio sighs 6t pebkiiig at it, nor did they peck sA grain t(f eaiid next morning St 11 & in. -At 4 p. "in. they begaa td peek ( but eei2* -ed ^er^iittle. One sttuek t epeatedlj> at I etufflb ef egg on the other's back, bat failed to seize it, though the other.bird .Wai quite Still. , The little birds showed ho sigha of fear of me, They liked to nestle in my wwffi hand, My f6* tertier was keen to get at them, much keener than with chicks, probably through scent suggestion. 1 placed two of the young pheasants, about a day old, on the floor and let him smell them, under strict orders not td touch then). He was trembling in every limb from excitement. But they showed no signs of fear, though his nose was within an inch of them. When the pheasants were a week old, I procured tt large blihdworm and placed it in front of the incubator drawer in which the birds slept at night. On opening the drawer they jumped out as usual and ran over the blindworm without taking any notice of it. Presently first one, then another, pecked vigorously at the forked tongue as it played in and out of the. blindworm's mouth. Subsequently they pecked at its eye and the end of its tail. This observation naturally leads one to surmise that the constant tongue play in snakes may act as a lure for young and inexperienced birds, and that some oases of so called, fascination maybe simply the fluttering of birds round this tempting object. I distinctly remember, when a boy, seeing a grass snake,' with head slightly elevated and quite motionless, and round it three or four young birds fluttering nearer and nearer. It looked like fascination. It may have been that each hoped to be the first to catch that tempting but elusive worm! Presently they would no doubt be invited to step inside.—-Nature. HE HAD .A NEW THING. And Genius, »» Is Always the Case, Got Itg Reward. Two men wore seated at a small table near the front door waiting for their sandwiches and coffee when they were approached by a shabby stranger, who touched his hat and said: "Gentlemen, may I ask a favor of one of you?" They were silent. It was no new experience to them. "What I wished to ask was, gentlemen, " continued the stranger, "how to spell the word balloon." They looked at one another in evident surprise and one asked, "The word 'balloon, ' you say?" * "Yes, gentlemen. I got into a discussion with a friend, who says there is but one '1. ' I maintain there are two. " "Your friend's right, " said one of the men at the table. "No, he isn't, "'retorted the other. "You're right. Two'l's.' "Let me see, now," said the first. "B-a-l-double-6-n-bal-opu. I think you're wrong, Bill, 1 and that this man's friend wins the bet." "It's no bet, " said the shabby stranger. "We simply got into an argument. You can see for yourself there is chance for an argument. If I had a pocket dictionary, I could tell in a minute. Gentlemen, would 'one of you loan me a dime with which to purchase one?" They looked at him coldly for a moment and then each pulled out a dime and gave it to him. "You're a good thing, " said the first one. "Yes, you've got something new," added the other, But the shabby stranger did not smile. He simply thankol them, and said he would buy one for his friend also,— Chicago .Record, Orchids For Cot Flower*. 80 many beautiful flowers drop their petals soon after cutting that they are opt of fnvor with purchasers, T,he efforts of florists are generally in the direction of introducing such flowers as will bold their own for some time after cutting. ' It is possibly, one of the leading advantages of the carnation that it lasts so long on the parlor table, and this is found to be true with many epe- oies of orchids which are coming into favor for cutting purposes, quite as much on account of this persistence as on account of their rarity and sweetness. In this oloeeJy related fainily the oypri- pedium is found particularly valuable. There are not only persistence, sweetness {04 curious features in the forms and oQlon o,f the flowers, put they also the long stems which enable the can florists tO'upe them, without the pf lavishly stemming them.." 's Monthly, , launch with » String t» It, In most pf the free lunch places down e & nickel in the e}pt ma* device, Wj)iPh }s placed in qjgse fftirftw Bad w flew** / "I'll fetes Ites id ft Rmtshty Mi fhy tseattty fiMt In ti$&ft gfbws" * * * * -. * * * "'i'rt happy,'"' Mglied te 9teiii«S rbSe, "Hef KUUAfit fey* np'ori We foetid. ftet fctStfh ftnd fftine in gfeetifag feleM, •I feel th* throbbing 6t her heart. OS* tie?** ie» as two ftpaf t f fiefe IhfougH iifo^ Mebin*oula 1 repose." ^-Clement CUffofd ift New York Ledgeh BANK BOOKKEEPING. A frstfect system Jfctef Haa atad Mo)» JieVe* fie toevoiojiod, ' • Thecrtsliier of ft prominent tip town batik sdys that.suoh a thing as a perfect gystein of bookkeeping had never been devised nhd probably never will be. 41 When yon think of it,"hesaid, "boob keeping is simply A questloh of mental ingenuity, What oue brain can devise in the way of safeguards another brain cab usually undo, speaking in a general Way. The daily papers ill condemning the banks because of the moderate salaries paid to bookkeepers overlook a very important fact. The banks pay the market rates to export bookkeepers, which are anywhere from $1,800 to $2, * 200 a year. Ah almost unlimited number of men can be obtained at these figures, and paying more money would not make the banks a bit safer, for the simple reason that men of strong mental powers, great business capacity and unswerving integrity are not, as a rule, content to be mechanical bookkeepers in largo institutions. I do not, of course, mean to disparage bookkeepers in any way. "The point is that the men who make good bookkeepers are unimaginative, reliable and steady going persons, who are ,not influenced by great ambition, and who do not aspire to lofty places. It is not required of a bookkeeper that he shall have very high mental qualifications as bookkeeping is now conducted in our big institutions. Each man has a stipulated amount of work of a stereotyped nature to do. He has of course enough ingenuity to swindle, if he chooses to do so. Anybody who believes that a perfect system of bookkeeping can be devised must also believe that it would be impossible to counterfeit money. The Bank of England has been held up as a marvel for many years, and yet it is no secret that that institution was swindled in the most complete manner for many years before it was found out. The most important and conservative commercial agencies and financial institutions in this city and London have lost money through their employees, and the Credit Lyonuaise, in France, where bookkeeping is said to have been carried to the very highest point of safety, was completely upset by a number of olerks two years ago, who had no difficulty whatever in hoodwinking the experts and pocketing the bank's money."—New York Sun. Who Invented the Guillotine? It is now certain that neither Dr. J. I. Gnillotin, who is said to have died upon the instrument which has a name so strikingly like his own, nor Dr. J. B. V. Guillotine, who has also been given the credit of being its inventor, was the designer of the French instrument of capital punishment. It is known to have been in use in Italy at least COO years before the time of either of the gentlemen mentioned and was the recognized instrument used for inflicting the death penalty in Scotland during both the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Gonradin of Suabia was executed by such a machine 'at Naples in the year 1368, and that it was in use in France more than 100 years before the time of Dr. ,T. I, Ghiillotiu is proved by the fact that the Duo do Montmorency was decapitated "by a sliding ax" in 1083.—St. Louis Republic. The Principle In Thought. During normal sleep cerebral force is restored which during the day was consumed. We cannot during wakefulnoss maintain an electric • supply as fast as we disperse it, as not only all thought, but simple consciousness itself, must consume something. Those are marvelous microscopic twinkles of electric light that attend the disruption of the miorosoopio cells when we think. Wonderful is that carnal enginery whose going, wrought by cerebral action, marks the genesis, and whose stopping indicates the exodus of pur lives,—New York Advertiser. A New Use For tlio Telephone. It has remained for the latter part of the 'nineteenth century to evolve another and wholly different method from that usually employed for the transmission of oscillatory favors, This is to have the matter accomplished by telephone, The invention is not, however, patented, and may upon occasion be adopted in other cities than Washing- toe, ^Washington Times. Soboolwate-m Why do you never your piano? We're buying it on 11 What difference does that "J'w afraid if jw $bev,l4 J>Jay fce'4 so P'" WkSJ^^^^&r^' dt tfa§ Ifflftlifisi MM ! grtMfid. , ye? have feta ft-deeeivifl of toe. ¥e* hand* tells toe ye* have bin iaarried twieet,"—Life. "The picture is all right, but I thought I ordered a sunset." "Just step behind the curtain for one moment, and it shall be done." - , n. in. For » Change, mitu.UiiiiiB.uciu* Suo tftKBa *«v-v«wv— — terest, too, iii matehfflaMfig Mid hfti 6f late repeatedly expressed Mi -"—" that the poorer princes of the . branches of the royal house of land'ought to marry into the wealthy aristocracy of Great Britain w Priaee Adolphas of feck has just done. tfhis yoaag aiaa has certainly don6 a Wise thiag by choosing as his .wife the daughter of the bake of Westifiinate*, the Richest peef ia England. tfeW people oatside the two families aad the lawyers are likely to possess trustworthy irtfofmation respecting the Sertleiaenta Ia this match, bat rnnior has it that the dake has provided a dowry of $500,000 besides settliag $35,000 a yearupoit the young ooaple. It may bo said wiwi ab" fiolate certaiaty that the prince, has brought nothing into the settlement be- yoad life insurance policies and possi* blya few thousands provided by the' queen, with whom he is deservedly a great favorite. It is no disgrace to the Duke of Took to say that he lives well up to and probably considerably beyond his income, especially since the future king of England became his soa-in-law.—London Cable. . • WE'just want to say a few words to the ladies about corsets. We are now soiling the Feiitherbone corset. Worh and recommended by a million well dressed ladies. Dressmakers 'claim that these are the best fitting corset on tlie market. G. L. Galbralth & Co. THE best butter is still to be found at the Opera House Grocery. ASK for Crystal Cream baking- powder, at Walker Bros. 1 A GOOD Beat.ty organ for sale or to trade for a bicycle. Inquire at this office.—17tf Wool Wanted. The undersigned having leased the Paragon Woolun Mills for a term of years ia prepared to, pay from 3 to 5 cents a pound more for w«o_l_ in caesi- meres, blankets, flannels, or yarns than can be obtained at your home market. Send for samples and prices. Roll and bat carding a specialty. Address S. D. Duncan, West Mitchell, Towa.—8m4 IT MAY DO AS MUCH FOR. YOU. Fred Miller of Irving, 111., writes that he had a severe kidney trouble for many c years with severe pains in his back, and also that his bladder was affected. He tried many so-called kidney cures, but without any good result. About a year ago he be/jan the use of Electric Bitters and found relief at once. Electric Bitters is especially mlnpfr'il to the cure of all-kidney and liver trouhi.es. and often gives altnc'isi, histiint relief. One trial will prove our stauunuiit.'. Price'only SOcfor large bottle at Dr. Sheetz' drug store. 0 KXIGHTS OF THE MACCABEES. The State Commander writes us from Lincoln, Neb., as follows: "After trying other medicines for what seemed to he a very obstinate cough in our two children we tried Dr. King's New Discovery and at the end of two days the cough entirely left them. We will not he.without it hereafter, as our experience proves chat it cures where all other remedies fail."—Signed F. W. Stevens.State Com,—Why not give this great medicine a trial, as it is guaranteed and trial bottles are free -at L. A, Sheetz' di-ug store: . Regular size SOu. and $1. 6 BUCKLKX'S ARXICA SALVE. The best salve in the world for bruises, cuts, sores, ulcers, salt rheum, fever sores, tetter, chapped hands, chilblains, corns and all skin eruptions, and positively cures piles or no pay required, It is guaranteed to give perfect satisfaction or money refunded. Price 25c a box. Sold by L. A. Sheetz. BOOMS to rent, J. J. Wilson,-43 E. G. BOWYER, now at the now stand in the Cowles block, has a complete stock of AND PINE JEWELRY, GRADUATED OPTICIAN, Eye» tested free of chaw. Large line of op ticiU good* always on hand. of Jlne witclM a specialty, Doxsee & Shaw, Abstracts of Title, , JQWA. Qfl)ee qyey Algpna State flaajt, MOST PBRPECT, MADE, A pufe dfapeGfeaffl off^ftat Pdwdef. .-.« roffi Animonla, Alum of any ether adulterant, 40 YEARS f MI STANDARD, CREAM BAKING WE SAVE you money, get you highest tattkn ptice,fcntl make you Iprompt ftud K& rflturnBonyour .VWOOL.. Our experience of M ye&n Is worth eomethlngto yon, oar reliability also. Ask Chicago Banker* or Mercantile Houses about us. Sacks free to •nippers. Write (or "Wool Letter." Silbermati Brothers* aot>>!4 Michigan Sfc, CH1CAQO, ILL. Slagle's Harness Shop. Manufacturers and dealers in Harness, Saddles, Whips, and all Harnoss goods. Also a full line of Trunks, Grips, and Telescopes. Repairing neatly and promptly done. All work flrst class. Give us a call and we guarantee satisfaction. SLAGLE & SON. M. P. 1IAOGAUD. G. F. PEEK Haggard & Peek, [Successors to Jones & Smith.' Abstracts, Real Estate, ANP Collections, ALGONA, IOWA. ' DR. L. A. SHEETZ, Drugs and Medicines. Full assortment always on hand or drugs, ined- clnos r and pure liquors for medicinal pui'poses only, :Boolca aoa-d. Statlonorjr. OCULIST. All diseases of tha eye treated, Glasses adjusted 1 for errors of refraction and accommodation. No charge for examination. For several weeks Dr. Murphy has been in New York taking a post-graduate course on the eye, and will roinaiu there until AprilS:}. ci'nr. IGE! ICE! ICE! During the past winter I have enlarged my ice bouse and now have on hand 400 tons of ice in Hue condition. Do not contract for your summer's supply of, Jce without first getting my prices. It will Ue delivered to all partu ol the city every day. Orders may be left with J. A, Hamilton & Co. Ice house and residence near the cemetery, CHARLES MAGNUSSON. Your Painting Will be \i ell done if you get T7TT T? XT to do.it.^— — * J-«J.Vi>l House and sign painting and paper hang ing as good as the best, Carriage pajnt tng a specialty. t3T"t want your work. A. D, Water or No Pay-,. We have a new wen-digging outnt, the beat that is made, and one well adapted to this section. Our long experience Jn jn&Wng BBOS. DB, PRESTON, Eye, Ear, Nose aoil Tliroat acoonjmQd'atlQjis at rates, OperatlonB foy cataraoi 8tr»ijjsm.uB, eforrnitie^, e(to, *0»tar& raMpRftUy ftid cauae rewovefl, Speptacles aoieri jfy flttefli jflnestiguamy lenses around to '. Office hours, W t« IS, I to fl, expspt ay, w.ea^aw, »»a '^urway Oppo Bite Pwfe Qte}, Mai Olty, Br, PKestotfytS' $MV* OffiV. *% rtf !tss«M

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