Warren Times-Mirror and Observer from Warren, Pennsylvania on November 16, 1971 · Page 8
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Warren Times-Mirror and Observer from Warren, Pennsylvania · Page 8

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Warren, Pennsylvania
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Tuesday, November 16, 1971
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Page 8
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Warren Tlmes-AAirror and Observer, Tuesday# November 16, 1971 -Sports of ----Red Smith A BIG MARSHMALLOW HOUSTON—Buster Mathis is big as Texas is big, and it has been said that in this state a man can drive farther and look longer and see less than anywhere else in the nation There may be more peaceable prizefighters than Buster but none his size; pound for pound, he probably is the mildest gladiator in circulation He is a decent, sensitive monster with one attribute that makes him seductively beautiful by fight mob standards The late Don Skene described this trait in a novel called “The Red Tiger.” “He was kind of a marshmallow.” Don wrote, “but at least he was a tag marshmallow.'’ Buster is back in Houston for the first time since Feb. 6, 1967, when he performed in a preliminary with one Tugboat Thomas, a canvasback from North Carolina. At first sight of Mathis undraped, Thomas genuflected. Buster struck him in the middle of his haircut, and Tugboat was one with nineveh and tyre In the main event that evening Cassius Muhammad Aii Clay disposed of the title pretentions of Ernie Terrell, then recognized by the World Boxing Association as heavyweight champion, stabbing, hacking and taunting Terrell over 15 rounds. Now the preliminary boy and the former champion are here to meet Wednesday night in the feature of a show the promoters hope to sell on theater-television With a display of courage as stirring as any likely to be seen in the ring, the promotional firm of Top Rank, Inc , has contracted to pay All $300.000 for the engagement. To Ali and almost everybody else, the tryst in the Astrodome is a mere pause on the way to a second match with Joe Frazier for the world championship To Mathis it is a new start in a profession he forsook two and a half years ago when, after a dismal defeat by Jerry Quarry, he went home to Grand Rapids, Mich., to brood and eat and play a little semi-pro football and eat some more until his weight hit 320 pounds and his savings account scraped bottom. Trained down now to a svelte 260 pounds and theoretically imbued with new confidence—-he says rehabilitation set in last March 8 when he watched Frazier whip Ali and decided he had more talent than the pair of them—he keeps reminding himself that he is theonly man on earth who ever beat Frazier, Ali, of course, seldom opens his mouth without whipping Frazier, but Buster beat Joe twice with his fists in trials for the 1964 Olympics. Four years later they met as professionals and fought on fairly even terms for about eight rounds, until Frazier picked a suitable site and began digging. In the 11th round the avalanche came down. Now Buster roughs up sparring partners named Dave Matthews and Dick Hall, sits through interviews with monolithic patience, and charms everyone with his unfailing, gentle courtesy. Tracy Forest, the small daughter of the manager of the Travelodge Hotel where Buster is staying, had a consignment of candy to sell for her brownie den. Buster was her first customer at a table her father set up in the lobby. He gave her a $5 bill for one box, then gathered up her entire stock and walked into the cocktail lounge. (Parched travelers who haven’t visited Texas lately will be cheered to know that boose-by-the-belt has at last reached these plains.) “I’m Buster Mathis, the fighter,” he told patrons in the bar. “Don’t you want to buy some candy?” In five minutes he had sold $24 worth for the happiest Brownie in the southwest. “You’re a sensitive man,” a reporter said, “and you must be aware that everybody regards this fight as just a whistle stop for Ali, everybody looks on you as a victim, an exalted sparring partner. How does that make you feel?” “If I lose,” Mathis said, “I’m just batting par. But if I win, that’s something else. That’s a real upset, man, and a whole new life.” Diring his two and a half years of soul-searching, Buster and his wife Joan and their baby son lived on what was left of his ring earnings. “It was hard,” he said, “but I guess everything is hard. I know I never got nothing easy.” He grinned, showing a gap in the middle of his smile. “Ithought it’d be easy. I’d be a fighter instead of gettin’ a job.” The rueful tone said he knew better now. It is a hard business he chose. It could be the wrong one for him. * 4 » tsîS •re,/®«®6* 96 '»V’J,*5** «,-94.. • 9B_30. ,ia.t< • 74. .33. B6a' 33 J World Cup Play Incident-Free \ ft«* >; J i ft ft » BABY DRAGONS FINISH WITH 7-1 SEASON For the third successive season Beaty’s Baby Dragons have finished their fall grid season with the distinction of winning more than they lost. In the front row, left to right, are Coach Tom Scarcella, Mike Reynolds, John Siefert, Bruce Ahlquist, Don Olson, captain; Tom Bonavita,captain, Tom Pellegrino,captain; Steve Snyder, Don Sturdevant, Randy Viola and George Knopick, coach Standing in the second row, same order, are Jeff McClement, manager; Mike Carr, Dale Allmendinger, Rod Retterer, Kevin Fischer, David Nowicki, Steve Witkin, Dick Jones, Craig Wozneak, Dave Smith and Jack Swedler, coach. In the third row stands Dave Haines, manager; John Morley, Jim Johnson, Rod Nobles, Rick Stachowiak, John White, Larry Wallin, Jim Rod Hoffman, Dick Newark, Don McKenzie, Bill Snyder and Gary Truttet, manager. Hie last row consists of Tom Lord , Fugi McPherson, Steve Mahan, Rod Baker, David Paul, Rick Ahlgren, Norm Johnson, John Stromdahl, Gary Heller, Craig Confer and Ed Ord. Absent on the day the photo was taken were Dan Pace and Tom Curren. (Photo by Mansfield) FINISH SEASON AT 7-1 Beaty HasWinning Tradition By DAVID PIRILLO Any successful coach, be it in baseball, football, or any organized sport, will verify the theory that a good team is the by-product of an equally competent organization. That’s the way Warren Dragon Coach Toby Shea feels about his Beaty Dragons and his subordinates—Tom Scarcella and George Knopick—who have nearly mastered the art of winning at the school on the east bank of the Conewango Creek. Turning a freshmen football squad with a 7-1 record to Shea for future use, Coaches Scarcella and Knopick enhance Warren High’s near term outlook. A successful season such as this is becoming commonplace at Beaty. The two previous falls saw the coaching tandem rack up 11 games on the plus side, while losing none and tying two. Much of the success at the school can be traced back through the eighth-grade program in recent years, before the elimination of contact tactics and the addition of the intramural program. The benefits, if any, of the touch football system will not bare results until the fall of ’72. CIRCUIT POINT CHAMPIONS were awarded at the banquet in honor of all racetrack drivers Friday night. As a note of interest, each of the above drivers finished third in the class the other won. (Photo courtesy of Mahan) Jay Plyler (left) circuit point champion for the Late Model Division at Eriez and Stateline Speedways, and Ron Blackmer, circuit champion for the Sportsmen Division, are pictured at the awards’ table at Erie’s Rainbow Gardens in front of the many mantel pieces that NEW YORK (AP) - The New York Rangers» traded four players to the St. Louis Blues Monday in exchange for veteran Wayne Connelly and two others in a mammouth National Hockey League swap. Moving to the Blues were left wing Jack Egers, defenseman Andre Dupont and right wing Mike Murphy along with a player to be named later. Accompanying Connelly to New York were rookie center Gene Carr and left wing Jim Lorentz. The key man from New York’s standpoint was Carr, a 20-year-old who was the Blues’ No. 1 junior amateur draft choice last summer. Carr had 38 goals and 104 points last season i i for the Flin Flon Bombers and had three goals and two assists in 14 games this seaon with the Blues. Coach Shea has been somewhat concerned over the demise of contact in the eighth-grade level, and Scarcella mirrors Shea’s thoughts when he was asked about next season. Scarcella honestly couldn’t project a forecast because of the uncertainty of the talent that will find its way into the freshmen program, and doesn’t know if he’ll have enough time to piece together a program that harvests bountiful results, like Beaty’s been accustomed to enjoying over nearly a half­ decade. In the season’s initial encounter, Beaty strung four touchdowns over an equal number of periods in taking a 30-8 victory over Corry’s freshmen Beavers. Then came Franklin, and did they ever come. The Knights chalked up three touchdowns and held the flammable Beaty offense to a mere six points in downing Warren for its first loss in fifteen games. That was to be the extent of failures. After a hand-to-hand dog fight with Bradford in which Beaty won by a two-point margin, 14-12, the Dragons became virtually untouchable over the next five games. First it was Sheffield dropping to Warren’s request, 15-0, and then Titusville obliged, 20-0. The Baby Dragon defense was unyielding, and they continued so in the next two games— shutting out Meadville, 34-0, and Oil City, 27-0. The Blue and Gold eleven capped an unquestionably successful year by rapping Ike with a 24-6 outcome. According to Scarcella’s game-by-game statistics, Beaty negated all net yeardage of the opposition in each of the final five engagements. While the defense was allotting a season average less than a touchdown on a per game average, the offense flexed its scoring power in compiling 170 points, or a 21.3 points a game. Beaty totaled 1650 net yards over the eight-game span, broken down that’s slightly over a 200-yard average in each contest. 1011 of those yards were on the ground. Defensively, the opponents gathered 522 total yards, 338 on the grass and 184 through the air. Leading the repetitious assaults was tailback Tom Pellegrino and wingback Bruce Ahlquist. The former carried the ball on 61 hand-offs for 356 yards, a 5.8 average, and six touchdowns. Although he carried the ball less frequently, on a ratio the latter was as effective. Carrying the load 34 times, Ahlquist was the team’s second leading ground-gainer with 201 yeards, a slightly better average than Pellegrino with 5.9, and an equal number of touchdowns. Ahlquist was the team’s leading point-maker with 44; thanks to eight extra points he outdid Pellegrino by two. Fullback Rod Retterer was called on even less than Ahlquist. Lugging the ball on 23 carries, he aggregated 163 yards for the team’s highest average per tote, 7.1. Don Olson, the team’s regular quarterback, rounds out the backfield. An accomplished passer, the freshman signal caller found his mark on 29 of 52 pass attempts for an above average quotient of 46 percent. Nine of those completions ended in touchdowns. Olson personally was responsible for two touchdowns rushing, a direct result of a season total of 57 yards. Possibly the best line prospect for Shea’s most immediate plans come in the form of Steve Snyder. The key, the center, on offense, the hard- nosed youngster was probably more eye-catching on defense with 12 solo tackles and 49 assists. His reflexes and reactions were magnified even more when he recovered four of the opponents’ fumbles. It’s stats like these and the aforementioned that have Coach Shea gazing and daydreaming of better days to come. By WILL GRIMSLEY AP Special Correspondent PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. (AP) — Another World Cup golf competition came to an end here Sunday and extended one of the sport’s most remarkable records—19 years without a penalty, disqualification or international incident. The United Nations could take heed. Even more, this unique event could well serve as a blueprint to the stodgy, tradition- steeped gentlemen who control golf throughout the world. “The answer is simple,” explained Fred Corcoran, tournament director of the International Golf Association. “We try to be human. We try to use common sense.” Thus in an unusual event which brings together players of 46 nations of differing languages, customs and political persuasions, it seems a miracle there has never been a single rhubarb or misunderstanding. “First of all, we have an official at the first tee to count the clubs in every bag,” Corcoran said. “That is not so difficult. Thus, no (me is penalized because of an inadvertent mistake. “Each man keeps his own scorecard. This is not left to the opponent, as in the case of other major tournaments. But we accept the responsibility. We check every scorecard with every player at the official tent.” When Corcoran handed a scorecard to Roberto De Vicenzo, the Argentine who won the World Cup individual title at Buenos Aires in 1970, Roberto said: “Thank you, Mr. Corcoran, but it is too late.” In 1968, De Vicenzo blew the Masters when he signed for a four on the 17th hole erf the final round when he actually took a birdie three. His playing companion, Tommy Aaron, made the mistake. Rotjerto was stuck with it. Disqualifications—some of them costly—have been imposed in major championships, many of them seemingly without reason. Porky Oliver once was denied a U.S. Open victory because he teed off early to avoid a thunderstorm. Few will forget the tragedy of Jackie Pung, who won the Women’s Open at Winged Foot in 1957 only to be disqualified because in the confusion of her victory she signed a wrong scorecard, kept by another. Lee Trevino was disqualified at the Westchester Classic in 1970 because he overslept. Doug Sanders, with a big lead, lost a PGA event in Pensacola, Fla., a few years ago because of the same error. Bob Dickson was deprived of the U.S. amateur crown because a locker room attendant put another man’s club in his bag, violating the 14-club limit. Similar cases are legion. In the World Cup, many players communicate by sign language because of differing languages. Even partners—such as the Uruguayans here—speak different dialects. “I think we must be realistic and human in our decisions,” Corcoran said. “Where a man intentionally tries to take an unfair advantage, he should be penalized. Where penalties can be avoided, they should be. “If the present system maintains, then the man who makes the mistake should be penalized as much as the player affected. If a man is really sick or is made late by an occurrence beyond his control, then he should not be disqualified. Plunkett-To-Vataha Magic Awakening New England ON TARGET TOO Miami Duo Clicks Rangers Acquire Connelly, Carr In 7 Plaver Deal With St. Louis Wayne Connelly Connelly, 31, had come to the Blues last February along with Garry Unger in the trade that sent Red Berenson to Detroit. He had five goals and 10 points for St. Louis this seaon and has seen prior NHL service with Minnesota and Boston Lorentz had 19 goals and 40 points for St. Louis last year and was a member of Boston’s Stanley Cup champions in 196970. He had appeared in just 12 games with only one point so far this year. Egers had two goals in 17 games for the Rangers this season while Dupont had been with Providence erf the American League and Murphy, a training camp holdout, was with Omaha of the Central League. MIAMI (AP) - Paul Warfield caught three passes against Pittsburgh. It doesn’t sound like much. But, to the Steelers, it was about as mutilating as three H-bombs. “I try not to waste Warfield,” said Miami Dolphin quarterback Bob Griese. “Paul seldom catches more than five or six passes a game ... but he’s a game-breaker.” The Griese-to-Warfield combination’s Sunday hookups covered 86,60 and 12 yards, all for touchdowns. A 21-3 Steeler bulge became a 24-21 Dolphin victory. Griese has heaved 16 touchdown passes, tops in the National Football League. Warfield caught his ninth, 10th and 11th against Pittsburgh, also the NFL’s best. “You know they’re a threat on every play,” said Coach Don Shula. “Warfield keeps a cor- nerback honest. Even when he’s not catching balls, Paul draws two or three defenders and springs everybody else open.” Miami, 7-1-1, collides with the Baltimore Colts, 6-2, Sunday with a 76,000 sellout assured for the Orange Bowl. The winner will walk away with the lead in the American Conference East. “Sure, the Colts just beat the Jets by one point Sunday,” said Warfield, “but you can’t count on other teams doing your job. If you’re going to be a big winner, you’ve got to do it yourself.” The Big Ten Conference produced both ends of the explosive aerial act. Warfield started at Ohio State and Griese was so effective at Purdue that he was named the Big Ten’s finest quarterback ever. Warfield began his pro career eight years ago with the Cleveland Browns, but Shula relinquished the rights to another Purdue quarterback. The Browns accepted Miami’s second-round draft pick two years ago, landing Mike Phipps from the Boilermakers. “When I coached at Baltimore, 1 always admired Warfield,” Shula said. “He is a real thoroughbred, equal to the best in the game. I jumped at the chance to get Paul.” Griese, who has heard his share of boos with the Dolphins, was cheered lustily after rolling out of a sickbed to ignite Miami’s victory. The pale, unmuscular quarterback rumbled onto the Orange Bowl turf after Miami had fallen behind 14-3 under George Mira’s direction. It didn’t work out at first, Griese fumbling in a booboo that led to the 21-3 Steeler edge. Then came the fireworks, highlighted by Griese’s 86-yard- er to Warfield following a mad scramble. Bob finished with 9 of-14 for 232 yards. BOSTON (AP) - The New England Patriots have one of the most effective passing combinations in the National Football League these days, with rookie Jim Plunkett, the league’s No. 1 draft pick, throwing to his former Stanford teammate, rookie Randy Va- taha, a last-round choice. Everybody knew Plunkett, the Heisman Trophy winner and potential superstar. Vataha was another story. At 5-10 and 180 pounds, he was considered too small by most to be a pro receiver, despite his outstanding performance in college. The Los Angeles Rams drafted him in the 17th round, then cut him late in the exhibition season. On Plunkett’s recommendation, he was picked up by the receiver-thin Patriots. “They were looking for receivers and they asked me about Randy,” Plunkett said in an interview Monday. “The basic question was; Could he help us? I told them yes. I knew he could catch and run excellent patterns.” Vataha has not made a liar out of his roommate. He is the eighth-leading receiver in the American Football Conference with 30 catches for 496 yards and five touchdowns. “I guess they were looking for someone Jim had confidence in” said Vataha, who once played one of Snow White’s dwarfs for a summer at Disneyland in California. Plunkett shows the confidence by looking for Vataha in key situations. “I know he’ll be open, and when he does he’ll catch the ball,” Plunkett said. Vataha admits he would like to be bigger, “but I think most of the detrimental effect of my size is in the minds of coaches and general managers. If I were 6-3, there would be a lot different reaction to my play. Now they’re skeptical.” There may be skepticism about Vataha, but about Plunkett there is no doubt. His four touchdown passes Sunday in New England’s 38-33 victory over Buffalo gave him 13 for the season, second best in the AFC. He has completed 91 of 203 passes for 1,281 yards and has had only one interception in his last four games. He is the only person who has played quarterback for New England this year, which has won four of nine games after winning only two all last season. “It’s hard to evaluate one’s own performance,” Plunkett said. “One is always harder on himself. I find I’m learning something new each week, but I’m also finding it tougher to do better each week because all the teams are so good.” “When everything’s working, play calling is no problem.” Plunkett said, “but that hasn’t always been the case. Sometimes I get help from the bench, but never when its third and 25. “They say: ‘You got yourself into that mess, now get yourself out.’” Brown Released From Hospital WASHINGTON (AP) - Larry Brown, star running back of the National Football League Washington Redskins, was discharged Monday from Georgetown University Hospital where he has been under treatment for about a week for a leg tusion. con- Busted Play Conversion Keeps Bears In Midst Of Title Race CHICAGO (AP) — It was what Dick Butkus called one of pro football’s “screwier” plays but suddenly the Chicago Bears are talking about going all the way. The “bad snap” play Sunday gave the Bears a 16-15 victory over the Washington Redskins and on Monday Coach Jim Dooley said “with five games to play we have as good a chance as anyone.” “We could do it, we could go all the way,” said fullback Jim Grabowski who sports a championship ring from former Green Bay Packer days. “I’m optimistic despite the toughest schedule in the league,” said vicious George Seals. “I wasn’t impressed with the Cotton Bowl Eyes Lions From State DALLAS (AP) — Alabama, Penn State and Nebraska were prime targets of the Cotton Bowl Monday in the race for a guest team on New Year’s Day to face the Southwest Conference champion. Auburn, another top candidate, also is high on the Cotton Bowl list but was believed leaning toward the Sugar Bowl in New Orleans. Georgia, although it suffered its first loss of the season to Auburn last week, also is a contender. Notre Dame also was an outside possibility. The Irish have played Texas in the Cotton Bowl the last two years. The Cotton Bowl is set to issue an invitation at 6 p.m. local time Saturday—the first day under NCAA decree such an invitation may be presented. The SWC host team is still in the air with Texas on the inside track. The Longhorns can clinch their fourth consecutive SWC title Thanksgiving Day with a victory over Texas A.M. Bears when I first got here,” said Steve Wright, acquired earlier this season from Washington, “But things have changed one hundred per cent. There’s a winning attitude now.” The Bears have had their share of pulsating victories in posting a 6-3 record to trail Minnesota by one game in the Central Division of the National Football Conference. But none could compare with the conversion which gave them a victory over Washington. “Imagine losing a game on a bad snap from center,” said Washington Coach George Allen. The Redskins had taken a 15-3 lead in the second half on Curt Knight’s fifth field goal. Mac Percival, who had booted a Bear field goal in the first half, added field goals in the third quarter and early in the final period to put the Bears within striking distance. With a little more than 11 minutes to play Cyril Pinder popped out of the backfield and raced 40 yards for a touchdown to tie the game and Bear fans sat back waiting for Percival to boot the “automatic” extra point and give the Bears the lead. But Gene Hamlin’s snap from center sailed over Bobby Douglass waiting hands and the crowd gasped. Douglass went sailing after the ball, scooped it up, dodged several Washington pursuers and threw it into the hands of Butkus in the end zone for the winning extra point. “I was just looking for anybody and I saw Dick so I just floated the pass to him,” Douglass said. Douglass also did a lot of work aside from the “bad snap” play. He completed 15 of 33 passes for 214 yards and carried 10 times for 88 yards. The Bears next face the Detroit Lions who they lead by one- half game in their division. A victory over the Lions would go a long way towards qualifying for the playoffs as a “wild card” team even if they fail to catch the Vikings. Carr’s Pro Debut Tonight In L.A. LOS ANGELES (AP) - Austin Carr, the first player selected in last year’s National Basketball Association draft, will play his first NBA game Tuesday night when the Cleveland Cavaliers play the Los Angeles Lakers, it was announced Monday. Cavalier Coach Bill Fitch said Carr, an All-American at Notre Dame who was one of the nation’s leading scorers last year, will probably start at guard. Carr suffered a broken bone in his right foot in the preseason and has been recovering for nearly two months. The 6-foot-3 Carr led an assault against UCLA last year as Notre Dame handed the Bruins their only defeat of the season.

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