Kossuth County Advance from Algona, Iowa on January 21, 1932 · Page 7
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Kossuth County Advance from Algona, Iowa · Page 7

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Algona, Iowa
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Thursday, January 21, 1932
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Page 7
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DIRECTORY 4»0i II, ISO*, ki the Itototflo lowft, Under th6 Act tt March I. m». Iw B Quafton H, W. Miller |W QCAttTON A MlttER 1AW Offices. I «,„«<*• OttWd 42*i residence 814 jphone*. A , gona| Iowa , J. L, BON AR Attorney-at-Law nfflce Iowa State Bank' Bldg. Office i»? 4M ^ Algona, Iowa Attorney?:*^ ^ ^ Algona, Iowa pHonea: * DICKINSON = ____ L. J. Dlckinaoi Attorney8-at*Law Office, 28; T. P. JI., 441 NE88, O. W. 8TIIAMAH Lawyers Attorneyu-at-Law Office in Quinby Block, 1 n.on/58 Algona. low. 1. A. WINKEL AtttorneyM-I'»w * Office in Quinby Building Phone 180 DOCTORS KENEFICK * KENEFICK Phyglclans and Snrgeonn Office over Rexall Drug Store Office phone 300 M J. Kenefick, M. D., res. phone 67 J.N. Kenefick, M. ;D., res, phone 82C C.H. CRETZMEYER Physician and Surgeon Office m John Galbralth Block Phones: Office, 310; res., 444 Algona Iowa T. B. Physician: and Snrgcon Office on South Dodge Street Phones: Office, 666; residence, 868 Algona, Iowa ' WALTER FRASER, M. D. Physician and Surgeon Office in Quinby Bldg., Room 14. Phone No. 12 FARM HOME IS BURNED NEAR H ANN A SWITCH Lu Verne, Jan. 19—A farm home on the Joe Frank place, three miles east of Hanna, occupied by the Charles Dennis family, burned last week Sunday. The fire started .near the roof and neighbors who arrived to help were unable to extinguish It due to lack of long enough ladders. Practically all of the furniture was saved. The family Is now living in a cement block garage till weather permits the building of a new house. Club Continue* "Travels"— Another Interesting meeting on Travel In the . United States wae conducted by Mrs. Harold Phillips and Mrs. P. C. Llchty when the Progressive Woman's club met a the home of Mrs. F. I. Chapman Friday afternoon. Mrs.' Phillips told of the garden spots of the southern elates and Mrs. Llchty had a .paper on winter playgrounds of the south. Mrs. Wm. Baddeley gave a talk on sports and' games In England. The treasurer reported tiat more than $20 had been turned' ver to the milk fund as proceeds f the plays given Christmas week. and reached he next meeting will be held with Preparations Mrs. Baddeley, with Mrs. Maynard Spooner assistant hostess. Lunch ivas served by the hostess, assisted iy Mrs. J. L. Llchty. Church Elects Officers— The annual election of officers of Ion's Lutheran church took place ast week Tuesday evening at the church. The following were elected: Elder, Ed Myers; school trus- :ee, Richard Wayne;, secretary, E. Zeltz; treasurer, Charles Wolf; building fund treasurer, Fred Schneider. Installation will take place- Sunday morning. Seven new members were added to the church at this meeting. Harlgs Wed 25 Years— The August Harlgs celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary January 8 at their farm home near St. Benedict. About 50 relatives and friends were present, to attend the party, and enjoyed a fine wedding supper. Five hundred and other games -were played during the evening. The Harlgs were the recipients of a number of fine gifts. CdtJNTY APVANCR ALGtQKA, IOWA PAGE8EVBM HAMMILL TO BE HONORED BY BRITT EASTERN STARS The Brltt NexVS-THbUrte for January 6 announced that the local Eastern Stars would give a reception noon In honor of ex-Governor John Hammlll, who was recently elected Most Worthy Grand Patron of the order at a national convention nt San Antonio, Tex. The Rev. B. M. Southgate, It was announced, would give a Welcoming address. Since he retired from office Governor Hammlll and his wife have been living quietly at their Brltt home. So far as known here, however, the governor has not resumed the practice of law. MEI/VIN G. BOURNE Physician and Surgeon Office In Postofflce Block Phones: ©fflce, 197; residence, 211 DR. W. D. ANDREWS Qgteopathlc Physletnn and Surgeon Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat— X-ray . Office over Hub Recreation Parlo: Phones: Office; 187; residence, 681 R. A. EYANS, M. D. Obstrctlcs and Electrotherapy viz: Diathermy and Ultra Violet Ray Over Borchardt Drug Store Phones: Residence 312, office 306. Algona, Iowa. DAVID BLYTHE IS BURIED AT FORMER HOME Irvlngton, Jan. 19—Roy Blythe Chicago, youngest son, accompanied the body of his father, David M Blythe, to Racine, Wls., for bifrla following funeral services at John Frankl's last Thursday afternoon He left Algona Thursday evening Racine for the late Friday burial had DENTISTS " DH. H.M. OLSON Dentist. Gas and noyocaine used for extraction. •••',•••• Lpcated over .Ch'ristensen Store. Phones: Business 166,-residence 470. Algona, Iowa Aid Supper Clears $12— Mrs. Aksel Neilson, Mrs. Lee Llchty and Jennie Mason, were hostesses to the Presbyterian Aid at the city hall last week Wednesday. In September it was decided that hostesses might take their choice of serving lunch or paying a sum into the teeasury. At the last meeting lunch was served, and nearly $12 was realized by the Aid. Attends Hallway Meeting— The J. M. Chrlstenson family spent Saturday night .with friends at Badger. Sunday they went to Fort Dodge, and Mr. Christenson attended a pension meeting of em- ployes of the M. & St. L. at- the Moose hall. The family attended a band concert by Karl King's band at the high school auditorium. been made by brothers of Mr. Blythe who reside at Racine. Mrs. Blythe accompanied by her daughter, Mrs L. Peck, Sioux Falls, and her eldes son, Arthur, of Wahkon, Minn., hav been spending several days at th old home here. Much of the furnl ture Is being disposed of, and othe matters are being taken care of Mrs. Blythe plans to go to Slou Falls with Mrs. Peck, and will re main there for the time being. It 1 understood that the house Is for sal or rent. A man from Livermore reported to be contemplating tak Ing over the -blacksmith shop. Embroidery Club Names Officers— The Embroidery club met las week Wednesday with Mrs. J. M Cox. A large number of members attended.' The annual business"was transacted and officers'elected. Mrs. Nels Mitchell was re-elected presi; dent; Mrs. George Stewart,'re-elected vice president; Mrs. Loren Brown, secretary-treasurer to succeed* Mrs. E. A. Guderian; Florence Brown and Mrs. Earl Miller, reelected flower committee. After the business meeting a program ar- WILBUR J. PAYNE, Edito? Carson Simpson, working at Hernan Carlson's, will move March 1 o work for Peter Seaburg. The Sea- urgs own a lot of good Innd north f Wesley. The Carlsons are well :nown Wesley farmers. Mrs. Gertrude Harrison, north of Vlgonn, in speaking of the t. b. est war, said her herd of 70. cattle ested clean at the last Inspection. n some of the counties we visit we hear a lot of talk pro and con about b. testing. The Frank Hoffs, who formerly Ived in the Geo. J. Schutjer neigh bor.hood, have moved to Buffalo Center, and were burned out In .a 'Ire. Mr. Schutjer said this was the second time the Hoffn had suffered such a misfortune. The Schutjers ive near Titonka. There Is a new girl at the C. R. McVeigh home, born December The McVeighs, who live south of the fairgrounds, have four boys and two girls now. The children the the most healthy, robust appearing lot we have seen. The new ijirl has been named Shirley Ann. We visited right after New Year's at the Otto Callies home south of Algona on "Lover's Lane." Mrs Callles, who hne been partially paralyzed for the past two years, showed us that she can now get to her feet and walk across the floor by using crutches. Her arm is still In a sling. At Fred Delkmann's Fred Jr., 13, has been sick with the flu. Robert, 5, has been sick with bronchitis. John Dennis. 2%, said he does not want to be sick. Mr. Delkmann is the faithful bookeeper at the Henry Kunz grain company. He has worker for this company 20 years. Henry Kunz, the'to'lg grain buyer and seller at Wesley, asked us to buy a carload of corn. Called on Menry Klocke, Wesley, but it was after dark, so did not see his stock. He has a nice family. Hie eldest daughter keeps house, and everything is in tip'top shape. Mr. 'Klocks says he has been peeking around the corner for better times, but said he guessed we would have to get busy t CHIROPRACTORS DR. H. J. THI88EN Palmer Graduate Chiropractor Thirteen 'year's .successful -practice Office over: State/a Cafe ', VETERINARY VW. FOX Veterinarian r West State Street, Algona Phones: Office, 475-W.; res., 475-R Whlttemore Teams Win— .Whittemore was victorious in both boys and girls' games when they played 'the local teams Friday. Scores were: boys 19-17, and girls 23-17. There will be two games this Friday, when both' Renwick boys and gii-ls' teams play here. Next Tuesday night the local boys play Algona at Algona. To Aid Cemetery Treasury- There was a good attendance at the meeting of the Cemetery asso- BUILDING CONTRACTORS COWAir* SON General Contractors Estimates Furnished Phones; Business, 639-J; res., 89 elation at Thursday. replenishing was. decided last for the treaeuryi an(J H try to raise money Mrs. Fred Wolfe's . Plans were made MACHINISTS NORTON MACHINE WOEK8 Machinists and Welders Service Stock on Piston Rings/Pins, and Bearings West of Courthouse Phone 662 PRODUCE SWIFT * COMPANY Ca»b, Buyers Poultry,' E«i, and HUet Matt Lamuth, Mgr. Phone 264, INSURANCE EOS8UTH COUNTY MUTUAL INSURANCE ASSOCIATION Over $16,000,000 worth of Insurano* In force. A home company. -Safe .•eoure. J, o. Paxsgn, Secretary TUE ALGONA INSURANCE AGENCY ~ ' C. B. La Bam M Falkenhatner Reliable Insurance Service Phone 66 by subscription. The next meeting will be February 11 with Grace Lichty. Burtlsts to Go to Fort Dodge—Mr, and 'Mrs. B. F. Burtis have rented their home to Mr. and Mrs. Ell Dager, of Chicago, 111., and have rented an apartment in Fort Dodge, where they will make their home this winter. Mrs. Dager is a sister of Mrs, Aksel Neilson, who lives east of town. Wedding Date Honored— Some 40 friends surprised Mr, and Mrs. Gus Reddel last Saturday night at their home in honor of their 34th wedding anniversary, Tl>e evening was spent playing'500, and a lunch was served at a late hour. Many gifts were received by the Reddels. ' . Teacher Has Operation— Bernice Swenson, third and fourth grade teacher, underwent an operation for appendicitis-at Algona last Saturday afternoon. At' this wr" ing she Is recovering nicely. Mrs.' A. J. Eason is substituting for her. place. Readings were given by Mrs. Allie Browrx and Mrs. Cleve Stewart, and there were two guessing games, after which there was a social hour and refreshments. Much Snow In Minnesota— Arthur Blythe, Wahkon, Minn., who came last week Wednesday to attend his father's funeral, had to make the trip by train and bus, because of too much snow in that section of the country for auto travel. He said a. long train in that part of Minnesota was stuck in snow 20 hours. Mrs. Arthur Blythe, well known to many here, was unable to come, but she is in good health. .Owns Penny 102 Years Old- Russell Fry owns, a penny 102 years old. It Is made of solid copper and is about one-eighth of an inch larger In diameter than a quar- ( ter. The only .designs on the coin are a Liberty head on one side, with stars around the outer edge. The date is 1830. The coin was presented to Mr. Fry 22 years ago by his brother William, of Winston, Salem', N. C., whom Mr. Fry wae visiting at the time. Mrs. Russell Fry Has Birthday— The children of Mr. and Mrs. Russell Fry gathered at their home Sunday in honor of Mrs.' Fry's birthday anniversary. 'Present were the Elliot Skillings, Fred Skilling, the W. L. Gregsons, and the Charles Harveys, all of Algona; Mr. and Mrs.' O. L. Miller, daughter Betty, Mr. and Mrs. Forbes Stilts, and two of the Dole girls. English Sick; No Preaching— Because of a, slight Illness the Rev. A. English was unable to make them better ourselves by working a little harder. Mr. Klamp has been traveling horseback part of the time, and says some.of his customers are amused to see him coming on top of a horse. Mr. Payne has been carrying skiis to get back from the main • roads since snow became deep. If we cannot .reach all our friends send us your order for what you want, and we will start the papers and send a bill out for them. Everyone should keep posted on county, state and national affairs in times like these. At the Fred Sonius farm Fred dollar they earn, and wonders how iong'they can keep it up. Mr. Schutjer said he was not what he used to be. He has been troubled with heart disease, but is v taking Ife a. little easier now. G. J. Schutjer, a son, lives just east, and said that sometimes he wishes he ad kept his position with the electric light company at Armstrong. A few years ago he was chief engineer. He moved back to the farm to bring his three, sons up on a farm. At present he thinks a salary job better than farming. Subscription business for our papers, Including the Des Moines dallies as well as the Advance, has been good this year, and we are very thankful to all our _ friends. We think it is safe to say that we have saved $400 In cash for our subscribers the past two months just on magazine clubs alone handled around Algona. We handle a huge volume of this business and get the low dollar price. In some cases we actually allow our customers a lower price on different publications in club with our paper than the paper's own agent can get. The reason Is that we sell so many more subscriptions than any one agent can sell that we get concessions he cannot get. One of our subscribers sent his order last Friday from Elmore with a special delivery lOc stamp on it. This was a subscription to the Advance that came in an envelope on which no postage was required. The' special delivery stamp we accepted as a sign of good will, and appreciate it. W. J. Barr, south of Algona, is one of the farmers who is steadily building up his dairy herd of Guern- seys. He is a nephew of A. J. Brown, the veteran breeder of Guernseys, was raised by Mr. Brown and grew up *with Guernsey cattle, and has raised Guernseys himself since he started farming 12 years ago. Mr. Barr showed us a four days old calf recently that looked promising. ' This calf's dam, I a five-year-old grade Guernsey, I produced 397.3 pounds tmtte'rfat last year, and made a profit above feed cost of $66.41 for the year ending November 1931. Another cow, a purebred Guernsey, five years old, produced 445.3 pounds of -butterfat that netted $77.84 gross profit above feed cost. This cow had a milk test of 5.32 p,er cent. The average milk production of the Barr herd was 7,398 pounds, average butterfat 350.3, and average income above feed cost was $52.24 for the year ending in November. The herd averaged just a fraction under 15 cow years, and made an*income above feed cost of $780. The herd produced butter at a cost of 18 cents a Then we learned that A. A. himeelf is president of the Lu Verne farmers Shipping association. He also has been a cattle feeder) but bought only a few this year. He raised 70 spring pigs, and bought 80 .more to feed out. The 1 70 pigs raised were eaVed from 12 litters. Mr. Schlpull was feeding some soy bean hay with the pods still on un- threshed. He said less than a fourth of the ration was made up of soy bean hay. He also was using about the same, or a little larger proportion of the boy bean hay In his cattle feeding ration, and said he would thresh some boy beans later. He had three and a half stacks of the beans set ready to thresh. About 30 cattle were In the feed lot.' Mr. Schlpull said the pedigreed Angus bull he bought last year had turned out to be a good one. His calves appear to have real quality. This bull will be kept two more years In the Schipull herd. 2500 TURKEYS SENT TO MARKET IN ONE SHIPMENT During the laet few years E. R, Hand, of Hand's Park, has raised great flocks of turkeys. Recently he sold the last of 4500 birds ready for the market. There were 2600 birds In this shipment, weight 40,000 pounds, and at 30c they brought $1200. Prices for the, season since from 42c to 2'fc. large flock of brooders left for this year's operations. September ranged Mr. Hand hae a RADIO PRICES SLASHED — Majestic, Brunswick, at less than BOc on the dollar. Little Napoleon radio $14.95 complete, Saturday. Limited number. While they last.— Gamble Stores. 25-19 WANT-ADS BRING RESULTS. Farmers Directory BABY CHICKS Always good money>',in early broilers. Leghorns bring same as le's, early ; 32c lib. received for our Leghorns In April last year. Pre- 1 pare now. Order at once. Big dls- coun^ on all breeds for January* February delivery, A few Hampshire , boars cheap;, also breeding W. Leghorn cockerels, turkeys, ducks, geese. Hamilton Hatchery Bancroft, Iowa. WANT AD City Property Loan* Fnrno Loan* Insurance, Retti lastate. CUNNINGHAM * LACI 107 W,' State St. Algona, Iowa JOE New and use4 Auto Part* Tires'and Accessories H(des, Fur and Alf opa, >*«»«•«»»»»•»«•••••«» H. W. P03T I>raj and Transfer Long Distance flauling. Every load insured against loss and dam? age of alj kinds> Equip* Ped to do aU Kind* of hauling and draylng. Wrestling' Team Comings- Next week' Friday night something new in the sports line for the local high school will take place when the boys will meet a wrestling team from Clarion. Fred Qraham is the local coach. . Students Taking 1 Exams-. Semester examinations are being given the last of this week. Friday afternoon the elimination declama- contest will be held. This contest is not public. John Frlestad Jjow— •John Friestad is still sick at this writing at the Mercy hospital at Fort Podge. His chances for are believed slight. < Other Lu Vorne News. Mrs. Austin Burtis, Anna Jutte, and George Jutte, of Webster City, called on Lu Verne friends and relatives last week Wednesday. The Auxiliary local leaders last Thursday at Mrs. Carl Neals. The lesson was on household textiles and eight attended. Mrs. John Vose, Mrs. J. It Cbrls- tensen, and Mrs. William Baddeley are hostesses to the Methodist Aid Wlttenpurs attend* J*. A. preach here Sunday. A song service was held at a quarter of 11,' after which Sunday school convened at the usual hour. In spite of bad roads and zero weather 30 persons attended Sunday school. Daughter for Harry Sablns— Mr. and Mrs. Harry Sabin are parents of a 7%-lb. girl, born Saturday morning, named Lavonne. A Mrs. Warren, of Spencer,' is caring for Mrs. Sabin and the baby, and Minnie Scheppmann is doing the housework. . Farm Couple Give Dance- Many neighbors and other friends took part in a dance Friday night in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Loss's wedding anniversary. It was given at the Loss home. ,' Other Irvington News. The Missionary society will meet this week Friday afternoon at the church; Mrs. O, L. Miller, leader. The national topic will be National Missions; the foreign topic. China. Mrs. T. E. Wickwire and Mrs. A. Butterfield will be hostesses. Mrs. Vernon Robteon, employed, at the Jacob Maasdam farm, was called to her mother's home, before Christmas, because of her mother's illness, but has now returned. She suffered a,^ nervous breakdown, but is now well," ' • ." A special all-day meeting o* the was busy doing chores.' In one building eteam was popping out of a pipe. Fred said It was a still—T still water. Fred has built a homemade water system that works excellently. He said he worked and planned for two years to build it. Asked for a drawing he said it was in his head. The plant works, and farmers might do well to look it over. Fred said it also filtered the water. Water is forced to the house, the hog house, and the overflow runs into the stock tank. John Ruger, at Lu Verne, mentioned that he had lost some hogs recently by allowing them to get too much salt. Mr. Ruger also lost hogs by flu, and considering hog prices on what he has left,£>vas Inclined to be discouraged about his hog raising operation this year. The Rugers have rented two farms totaling 320 acres. We hope he will have better luck with his hogs next year. One of the largest corn, cribs in these parts is the wire crib in the Ruger barnyard, full to a height of probably 20 feet or more. We recently visited the' Bleichs, of Burt, and asked Mr. Blelch how they made the trip to Minnesota at Christmas time to see their son. He said roads were not in as good shape up there as they are here but they had no trouble. Mrs. Bleich said she had a letter from her brother, Will Bohns, now at Woodburn, Ore. Mr. Bohns re- pound, not including labor. Mr. Barr will probably increase his herd slightly this year, as he has some promising calves that he expects to grow out. Saturday we visited at the A. A. Schlpull home east of Lu Verne for a few minutes, and with us was a man who last year served as commander of the Legion at Renwick. This man said Mr. -Schipull's brother took his place as commander when he retired, and that Mr. Schipull's father was a councilman at Renwick, whereupon we remarked that A. A.'s must be real people to have so many important relatives. illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllffl i PUBLIC SALE s As I am going to quit farming I will sell at public sale on my farm located 1 =5 mile east and 1 1-2 miles north of Fenton; 1 1-2 miles north and 4 miles west of as Lone Rock and 4 miles south and 1 west of Seneca school, on | Thursday, January 28 = COMMENCING IMMEDIATELY AFTER FREE LUNCH AT 11 O'CLOCK A. M. 129 HEAD OF LIVESTOCK 29 I SIX GOOD WORK HORSES as ss Ranging in wt. from 1400 Ibs. up. Four of these are bays, two of which are SS mares. The other two are grey geldings. |* TWENTY-THREE HEAD OF CATTLE S Nine milch cows, some fresh now, others to be fresh soon; 2 heifers to be 5 fresh soon; 4 yearling heifers; 3 yearling steers; 1 registered Shorthorn bull; 4 | calves. ' j •^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^•^•^^••••••^••••^^^^^^^••^^••^•^••••^^^^^•••••^^^•••••^•••••••^•^•••••••••••••^^••••••^•••^^••^••••••••••••••••••••^W I I A Full Line of Farm Machinery j Deering grain binder, 8-ft.; Deering corn binder; 1 McCormick-Deering corn i picker; Samson tractor; 2-bottom P & 0 tractor plow; .John Deere sulky plow; 3 John Deere cultivators; John Deere disc, 10-ft.; 1 Keystone disc, 8-ft; 4-section drag; 2 drag carts; Dain hay stacker; McCormick mower, 6-ft; Deering rake; one Emerson spreader; John Deere 999 corn planter with 110 rods of wire; John Deere endgate seeder; Sterling broadcast seeder, with grass seed attachment; John Deere elevator, 32-ft.; De Laval cream separator, No. 17; two 1 1-2 h. p. gas engines; 2 narrow wheel wagons with box; truck wagon; hay rack; feed grinder; 2-hole John'Deere corn sheller; 1-hole corn sheller; 3 sets of Concord harness, almost new; and many other articles too numerous to mention here. There will be no side bidders. Everything will be sold as advertised. I TERMS: Cash, or any arrangement you can make with your banker. No i property to be removed until settled for. i I Fred Jentz, Prop. met NOTICE TO FARMERS Aid will take place next. "week Thursday. Each woman attending will furnish sandwiches and a covered dish. The day will be spent at quilting. Mr. and Mrs. Howard Currell, of Boone, are parents of a girl, born January 11. 'Mr. Currell la a nephew of Earl Miller, and is known here. The Currells have one also. Audrey Fry is spending this week with her sister, Mrs. Fred Skilling, Algona. Mr. Shilling 1» employed by the state, and is dplng night work at the present time. The Clifford Dehnerts, Minneapolis, who are visiting relatives here and at A^rona, were Sudday dinner eets of the Ben Dwengera. "A daughter of Mr. and M«?. cently had an operation for appendicitis. There are still many in the Plum Creek neighborhood who will remember the Bohnses. Mr, Bohns was one of the champion checker players in that neighborhood. Henry E. Gerdes, northwest of Wesley, has had hie building painted and improved. There Is a family of three boys and two ; girls. A daughter, Mrs. ,William Fritz, who lives in the same neighborhood, has been very sick, A boy was born to the Fritzee New Year's" day, their first born. Mrs. Fritz 'is recovering slowly, but the.baby Is sick with erysipelas. The oldest Gerdes boy has been doing the work at Hallard Snyder's, north of Sexton, while Mr. Snyder is at Des Moinee for a soldier's examination. Mrs. Gerdes and Mr, Snyder are brother and sister, and their parents live south of Des Moines. Gep. G, Schutjer is one of the real farmers- up near Titonka. He ovyns.440 acres of fine land with a Jot of improvements," has five boys and three g}rle. Raymond is staying at home, Bpulah is teaching the home school, and the other children are married and getting along f or themselves. Mr, Schutjer thinks people are spending $1.25 to each , NOTICE To My Farmer Friends. Due to the fact that the-- roads have been almost impassable, as you folks have undoubtedly experienced, my regular calls have been delayed. Folks will say, "I have been waiting for you, and was wondering if you had quit." No, folks, I haven't quit. I am enjoying a good business from you, and thanks for it. I hope to serve you with the good old Watklns products for a good many years to come. The business you save for me is greatly appreciated. If there are goods you may need between regular calls, I will appreciate your calling at my home when you are in Algona. I live just two blocks south of the Iowa State bank and you will see the Watkins sign on the porch. By the way we have a couple of good Watkins territories open for young or middle-aged men who Want to get into a business of their own, with a good future. If interested call at my home. . H. J. VA1OHB STEEG The Wutlclns Man •ALGONA =E FRED FLAIG, Auct. N. L. COTTON, ClerS. i 1IIIIIIIIUIIIW |llllll!IHIIIIUIIIIHIIIIIIIIII!lilllllllllM [Closing-Out Public Sate S As I am about to quit farming because of ill health in the family, I will «ell;j SB the following described property at public auction at the Angus farm 2 1-2 miles ! west and 1-2 mile north of Burt and 1-2 mile south, 2 miles.east and 1-2 south of;;! 3 Lone Rock', on Friday, January 29 STARTING AT 1 O'CLOCK 19 Head of Horses 9 WANTED jr. 0 ,,. hundred with Eczema to try Dr, Erlckson's wonderful new remedy on a guarantee. Thousands have recovered recently. —K. D. James. (1) Poland China Bred Gilts Up-to-date breeding. Prices reasonable, Fall pigs. Either sex. Immune, 2 Holstein Hull Calves. April and October. R, W, BUTTERFIELD Burt, Iowa Johnson, Algona, m" w»tU pneumonia. la now ijcuproved. Mr. and Mj* f», W. Jjee» #eriou.sly. Her One sorrel gelding 8 yrs. old, wt. 1600 Ibte,, in excellent condition; one black gelding 8 yrs. old, wt. 1500 Ibs.; one gray gelding 12 yrs. old, wt. 1500 Ibs.; one roan gelding 4 yrs. old, wt. 1500 Ibs.; one sorrel gelding 10 yrs. old, wt. 1400 Ibs,; one roan mare 7 yrs. old, wt. 1400 Ibs.; one gray mare 10 yrs. old, wt. 1500 Ibs.; one black mare 10 yrs. old, wt. 1600 Ibs.; one roan colt 7 mos. old. All horses are in good condition and are wonderful buys for anyone. ~~"~~ 14 Three heifers; one bull; two calves, 2 months old. All high grade Holsteins. T. B. tested. No better anywhere. 45 Hogs—7 Turkeys Five brood sows due,to farrow in February, 40 fall pigs. Can't be beaten, Six Bronze turkey hens and one torn, all fat, nice turkeys. ..'.-•> 75 LEGHORN CHICKENS > Farm Machinery, Etc. One DeLaval cream separator, in good condition? one John Deere 5 1-2 grass!. nioWer, nearly new; one hay rake in good shape; two hay racks; one bob ^leflj cross chain, fine buy; one John Deere single-row cultivator, sibQut new; ofte In? ternational single-row cultivator; one McCormick Deering 2-row cultivator, ajl are nearly new and in A*! condition; one John Deere seeder, in good shape; oijtij 10-ft. drag; one 24-ft. drag; 2 gang plows, 12-in., in good condition; 3 10 : ft. d^,; in good shape; one t ruck wagon with triple box, springs and all, complete; 0jRg1 .iron wheeled truck wagon without box; 4 sets of harness, all in very excellent $1 condition; two bangboards; one Ljtchfield manure spreader in fine shape; cr~ •"' get of hay slings; one set of sling pulleys; 150 ft. of hay roue. Twenty bushels of seed corn; 10 gal.-cream can; one cistern pump, good new; one swill cart; one 3-tube radio in good condition; one creep-cut saw? Q mail box and other articles. . ' TEKMS—Cash, or see foir WwkflT* \ t ,' < r . u I t,^ I Fl !* t and ^ijff ^p^« fli^^npup T* c TV • ^wi •! ^B^HP* -»V't , ' "^jf'it.. w

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