Kossuth County Advance from Algona, Iowa on October 15, 1931 · Page 1
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Kossuth County Advance from Algona, Iowa · Page 1

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Algona, Iowa
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Thursday, October 15, 1931
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LEATHER Of ALGONA, IOWA, OCTOBER 15, 1931 10 Pages Number S OREST ARSHAL WOUNDED MERCHANTS \] INSTITUTE BE TUESDAY |e Expert* Give [Hint* oft 'Better Methods. , than 250 store owners and clerks attended a business In' at the new school auditorium ay night given by S. B. Bell I F Craney, national trade eilors, and Chas. E. Saunders, paul, under the auspices of Igona' Community club. program was opened with Jjy a'quartet composed of D. hiltb, D. R- Steele, C. D. p and Roy Keen, accompanied e piano by Mrs. Sylvia Gunn. Harrington welcomed the vls- and told of the building of the school, and some of the diffi- 9 encountered. ator L. J. Dickinson was call- id gave one of the best talks js given In Algona. Senator nson told his audience that must get down to work cut out the unnecessary 5 and build on a solid founda- IFalkenhainer, presided at the |ng and introduced - speakers. Out-of-Town Business. ob o£ the business, of any town |to stores in other towns, and «rcentage ranges from 2 in • lines to 55 In dry goods and lines, the speakers said, are some good reasons for [many of which can be over- by a local merchant. One lie reasons Is that the local has out-of-date stock, poorly land poorly displayed. This can ' remedied by a live proprietor. [other reason for out-of-town is the attitude'''and •salesman- tot clerks in the store. The xle must be made by the clerk, 1 else usually fails If the clerk ifflcient, offensive, or iridlffer- f One reason many go--out of OUR 1931 HUDDLE-OR IS IT MUDDLE? Vinos RUNNIN THIS TEAM ANN WAX STREET CONGRESS SHOULt) HEAVE FEW LET INCOMES CARRV . /; THE BALL/P VMATS THfc SIGNAL FOR A OVER HEAD CHARGE / FORMATION is THE BUNK [ Is to see larger stocks stores. This can only ne in part by better divided and moving stock more r t 'of the main reasons people lit of town is classed as recrea- [and is espicially true among for whom shopping in out- jrn stores is a, recreation sec- none. This cannot be met fie local merchant except that that his stock Is good, and fpeopie who visit out of town lind his price is right for class of merchandise, often affects sales, more- at lit than in normal times. This on the merchant's buying or his salsmanship.. Item Feature Urged. irtising in store and outside 'reed. A weekly featured item [suggested, and that item, for Bres, should be featured in the [and in the newspaper adver- nt. Clerks should be instruct- the item, and ir should be iyed prominently both In the and in the advertisement. tors should be - sure that the |is a good 'Selling item., - Atto work off out of date or, grade items fail, and give Me advertising a bad name. isons why customers prefer one [to another were : told as the of a survey pf 10,000 custo- k Stock and store arrangement, of clerks, advertising, and ' reasons wer e discussed. Mer" should keep clean and up to itocks, well arranged. The In- of the store should be changed arance, and stock shifted, should be made weekly, "be advertised extensive- should remember they 'Ployed to sell merchandise 'ork for the Interest of the Jby suggestion of items. They against over doing the 'S, for many customers re. en talked at. the convention druggists at the hotel-In (IWnoon as a part of the com o f the druggists insurance ~ headed by Al Falkenhaln- "* were more than 50 drug- the convention. LODGE MEETIN6 HELD JMWIC TEHPLE firat regular meeting of the aaaonic Lodge Jn the new ». formerly -occupied by the hospital, was held last < Eighty local ; members visiting members,fropi towns ** h to of more tfea n 50 " «t. Thethtm ?. M COURT SCHEDULE FOR TWO YEARS RECEIVED HERE The biennial .c'ourt.-.-.schedule'^of- | time and'the place of terms: in trio various counties of the Fourteenth Judicial district for the years of 1932 and 1933 has been received by District Court Clerk Clark Ortbn. The first week of <gich term is to be devoted to equity and non-jury cases and the jury is to be summoned to appear on the morning of. the j second day of the second week. Thej grand jury is to appear on the morn-' ing of the second day of the first- week. The schedule for 1932 follows: Emmet, January 25, Marqri 28, August 30, October si; Dickinson, February 15, April (18, September 19, November '21; Clay, January 4, March 7, May 9, October 10; Poca- hontus, January 25, March 28, August 30, October 31; Buena Vista, February ] 5, April 18, . September 19, November 211; Palo Alto, January 4, March 7, August 30, October] 31; Kossuth, January 25, March 28, September 19, November 21; Humboldt, January 4, March 7, May 9, October io. The schedule for 1933 follows; Emmet, January 23, March 27, September 5, November 6; Dickinson, February 113, April 17, tember 25, November 27; Sep- Clay January 2, March 6, May 8, October 16; Pocahontas, January 23, March 27, September 5, November 6; Buena Vista, .February 13, April 17, September <2o, November 27; Palo Alto, January 2, March 6, September 5, November 0; Kossuth, January 23, March 27, September 25, November 27; Humboldt, January 2, March 6, May 8, October 16. According to the schedule Judge James DeLand will hold court in Kossuth county for the sessions beginning January 25, 1932, .November 21, 11*932, and September 25, 1933. Judge T. C. Davidson will be on the bench here September 19, 1932 ; ,and March 27, 1933. Judge George A. Heald will hold court beginning March '28, 1932, January 23, 1933, and November 27, 1933. RS. L. D. DICKINSON, mother was 85 last week, and whose honor the Senator and Mrs. Dickinson gave a birthday party. Mrs. Dickinson 1s proud of her son, and keeps well posted on state and national events. LONE ROCK MAN CHAR6ED WITH DESERTING CHILD Baymond Blerstedt, of Lone Bock was brought before Justice- L. A Winkel last Thursday, and was bound to the grand jury on the charge of deserting fois wife and two-year-old boy. The charges state that Blerstedt took Mrs. (OSSUTH BANDIT CAUGHT IN KANSAS Hilary Henderson, one o£ the ban- It gang that robbed the Lu Verne, t Benedict, and Wesley banks, was rrestod last week at Wichita on a large of robbing the •Haysvllle, {an., bank. It is understood that [enderson will not be returned to owa to face charges, but will be rled in Kansas. If conviction fails lere state authorities will probably ring Henderson back to Kossuth ounty for trial in connection, with to her father's July 26, and never returned for her, and Blnce was served fpllowlng the e building will be op<i 1 evening. Friday afi evening the building ^ m to^the general public,. IIH^imi* ^OEWpFIIJWUAp »beij , 0 f 4Mf c^mjajlgslonj -•"• «t ^ that time has failed support or live with Werstedt waived preliminary bear, ing and was bound over to the grand jury on a *1.000 bond, Mrs. Bier stedt's parents are Mr. and Mrs C#ude Seeley, farmers near i —~" " >res. Jessup to Dedicate New School , grand opening of the new high to being planned by boar4 for October 89, ' W$*** weeks [•Win „ V S7WW^«" «• **P j»*5«w"» «• -«•>- • L *L5' **** 1 ^9£M» ** W Ul# *«*» WB ^ 6 * ^* „ ~r, RJS*** h ^T»foj» .s? ST *p* tm** *« * 9 *?» « other- Bffloeri.I*? *fr ,. .«<»«,»»- and BORN-HUSKERS TO MEET IN CONTEST NEAR LIVERMORE The annual bi-county corn "husking contest will be held this year at the Charles Jones farm near Livermore a week from Saturday at 10 a. m. Kossuth and Humboldt counties have held this annual contest for several years, and the winner Is eligible for competition in the state contest, at which the Iowa champion 's selected to compete in the great Corn Belt Derby, which will be held this year at Grundy Center. The Jones field was selected for the contest because there are long rows of corn that stand up well and promise a good yield, which should help local contestants to make a good record.» Time of contest is one hour and 20 minutes. Wagons, teams I and drivers are furnished for contestants, and each man husks on a separate piece. His location in the field, his driver and wagon are determined by lot just before the contest starts. Each contestant must husk all corn and pick up loose ears on two rows; gleaners follow each man to gather all marketable corn that is missed. All corn left In the field ds weighed and husks in excess of 5 oz. per 100 Ibs. is charged against the man's load and, deductions from his total are made accordingly. Anyone wishing to enter- the contest should make entry at the Farm i Bureau offices either In Algona or Humboldt by next week Thursday so that arrangements may be made to have wagons and drivers for all contestants. Entrant should indicate his address and average amount of corn husked each day . in past YOUTH GIVEN 10 YEARS FOR THEFT OF GAR Lu Verne Youth is Paroled After Sentence. Brucno Ristau, 20, of Lu Verne, ileaded B&ilty before Judge George Henld in district court Saturday to charge of stealing W. Scott Hanna's car, and was sentenced to (10 years at Atiamosa. Because of past good behavior and his parents the youth was .paroled- to Mr. Hanna during good behavior'. ' Mr. Hanna did not know his car had been stolen till he was called by long distance from a Waterloo auto market and questioned concerning the car. It then dawned upon him that the car had been stolen a couple of nights before, and he investigated, finding the large family car in the garage, but his Chevrolet gone. Caught Claiming- Sale Money. Ristau was caught when he returned to the auto market, and was He here Saturday, and bond was set at SI 000. He was taken to Humboldt, | where Judge Heald is holding court this week, and- was sentenced. Judge Heald wound up the September term of court here last week, after spending three weeks in Algona. Judge Heald has inaugurated a ne\v practice for district court judges that is meeting with the approval of lawyers. He is spending J8 days of each term in actual residence at the town where court is in session. Thus he is always available during this time for attorneys who have rush matters to bring up. The suits brought against the schoo 1 . district, folowing the cancel- ation of the .Mayer contract to build the new high school, were settled .out of court .last—week Wednesday. Out of a total of nearly $110,000 asked by the Mayers and the Humboldt Investment Co., the plaintiffs Algonian Was Upstairs When Emmet Sheriff Has Shot brought back to Lu Verne, waived preliminary heai-ing John McGuire, who was playing with th« group at Gruver a week ago when Sheriff Gordon conducted a raid on the Buysman pool 'hall, In which the sheriff was shot, was not in the room when the shooting occurred. He and a number of the other players had gone upstairs by a back stairway -when Buysman noticed the sheriff come into the hall. Buysman heard the door of the pool hall open, and he Inspected the newcomer through a small hole In the door. Recognising the sheriff, Buysman stopped the poker game then in progress, and McGuire and a number of the others left the room by a stairway. Sheriff Gor don came to the door to the back room and ordered the door opened, but Buysman waited till the players had reached the upstairs. A few seconds later the shot came. McGuire, and the others upstairs did not know who fired the. shot. .Didn't Know Sheriff Was Shot. They did not know what was going on, and waited for a few min utes, and then came down stairs There was no one around. They be lievod the shot was fired by the sheriff to hurry Buysman In open ing the door, and did not know th sheriff had been shot. The group dispersed, and Me Guire came to his home, where hi learned the next morning that th< sheriff had been shot, and he wen to Estherville immediately. Logan, who is believed by officer* to be the man who' shot the sheriff •and "Blackie" Simmons, of Esther ville, came i-nto the game after i had been started by the other group who had a sociable game occasion ally. By WHber J. and Alice Payne. At Close of- business Oct. 13. LIVESTOCK Hogs. . std. lights, 200-260 Ibs $4.70 . hvy. wt. butch., 260-300 $4.50 . pme. hvy. butch., 300-350 . .. $4.00 . pckg. sows, 300-950 $4.0o Jest. hvy. sows, 350-400 $3.70 Big hvy. sows, 400-450.. .$3.00-3.50 Cattle. !anners and cutters $1.00-2.00 'at cows '$2.60-3.50 Veal calves $5.00-6.00 Bulls $2.25-3.00 Yearlings • $4.00-5.00 "•at Steers ' $6.00-6.50 GRAINS' •Jo. 2 yellow corn received a little more than $3000, which was paid by the bonding company that underwrote the Mayer bid. The bonding company was given a judgment against the Mayers for $33,320:52, for the contractor's failure to complete the building. Contempt Action Is Halted. John Blinkman was brought into court Saturday on an action charging contempt of court for failure to pay $30 per month alimony as required by a divorce decree filed in September. Blinkman was not charged with contempt following his McGuire was not held except fo questioning as to whom accompan led him upstairs and he was release shortly after he appeared at Esther ville. He, and the rest of th group, are to return to Esthervill when the grand jury meets, and wi be witnesses for possible grand jur action against Logan. Logan Is Still at Large. Logan is still at large, but polic over the ...country., have been give his description. Logan first cam to Estherville two months or so ag and has been running poker game and generally loafing around Emme county. He appeared at some gra ing camps to play with the grader but he did not visit the McGuir camp. McGuire was well treated by the officers at Estherville, and he was released without bond. He is well known in both counties, where he and his brother have operated grading camps, and the conduct of his camps has been above suspicion. Both men are respected as honest and hard working, and Mr. McGuire regrets being connected with a fracas such as this, even • though Algona Markets EX-ALGONIAN IS TARGET OF THREE GUNMEK T Shot in Attempt to. Question Youth* / in Car. • C. D. Montgomery, night marshal at Forest City, who was shot I Sunday, is a brother-in-law of W5.I A. Button, and formerly lived owl the David King farm west of. I town. When the Montgomery*! were first married they lived ott f a farm near Hurt, and are well known in other parts of county. No. 3 corn 25%c . 3 oats 16c 3ar^ey 24c PRODUCE Eggs, straight run IGc Graded, No. 1 23c Graded, No. 2 fliSc Cash cream 30c POULTRY Springs, over 4 Ibs 14c Springs, 3 and 4 Ibs i2c Springs, under 3 Ibs lOc Hens, over 4 Ibs I4c Hens, 4 Ibs. and under lOc HIDES Calf and cow, Ib 3c Horse .. $1.T5-1.00 Colt Hides, each 50c appearance, and will make the pay- only incidentally. Buysman was ments. A divorce was 'granted to fined $300 and-costs, and given six Mrs. Amy Johnson from Ernest Johnson, and Mrs. Johnson was given custody of Dolores, 5, and Loretta Johnson was directed to pay his wife $10 per month. The term that just closed was one of the busiest for many terms, and Judge Heald forced dismissal of many old suits, for which no good reason for continuing could be made. The extraordinary number of "suits filed for this term, together With an almost equal number hanging over from previous terms, kent all court attaches busy. months In jail by Judge Davidson Tuesday on a charge of operating a gambling house. FROGS AND SNAKES 60 AS POOL IS DRAINED TOWN AND VILLAGE TAXES LEVY LOWER Only a few mayors and councilmen showed up at the tax investigation committee meeting at the courtroom last w^ek Wednesday evening,/and discussjon of^clty_ tax- es~"~~\vas"eon'fined" * to*'those"prese"ntl The towns and cities (have cut their levies this year, it was reported by those present. The discussion was thrown open to general tax problems, the poof- fund .increase was attacked, and administration of the money received from gas and auto license taxes was criticized. At present the auto license money is spent on state roads, and none returns to'be spent on local and township roads. The poor fund is -now $5000 over drawn, and this winter will make severe demands on it for relief purposes. The expense of keeping a welfare worker was questioned, and it was suggested that the office be done away with and the township' trustees, town clerks and councils and the board of supervisors be required to look after the poiT. A legislative suggestion was made wherein the legislature require each township to take care of its own poor, and have a separate levy foi that purpose. At present the county is the unit. By this legislation each township would have a definite reason to keep paupers out, and keep poor fund expense down. . C. D. Montgomery, night marshal) at Forest City, was shot early Sunday morning when' he and three other officers engaged in a gun batttad on the streets.of Forest City wttte three youths. Montgomery, who wa»? shot in the leg, is recovering at •. Forest City hospital. Montgomery was making his uauaD rounds early Sunday morning wbetK. he saw a car occupied • toy thraat young jiellows. He came up to th* car, noticed that they were asleep,. and then looked them over, and saw that one of them was armed. Youths Shoot When Wakened. Montgomery called Sheriff 6wen—• son and his deputy of the samn name, and Roy Arnold, chief of the} vigilantes, and the four went to thai car and woke the youths up. JThaa: youths started shooting and Montgomery fell In the first exchange oCT shots. The sheriff, deputy and Me., Arnold continued to pump bullets afc the car, which had been started by one of the trio, as long as the car- was in sight, and the fire was returned, however, without further- damage. Montgomery was also struck in-. the head with the butt of a gun hart- en -*- -*- he robberies here. ."Wild Bill" or "Two-Gun Bill" Henderson is believed to have been he ringleader In the gang or in everal gangs that pulled daylight obberles on many Iowa and Min- lesota banks In 1929 and 11930. He md always eluded capture. Kossuth officers 'time and again ried to capture him when he was believed to be in Kossuth county, uut Henderson .had slipped away vhen the officers arrived. A reward o£ $250 had been placed on his head by the state of Iowa. ( It is reported in daily papers that Henderson has confessed to robbing he Haysvllle bank. ALGONIAN WINS 4-H CALF CLUB RECORD BOOK CONTEST Dairy calf 4-H club record books were judged by Floyd Arnold of the extension service and Frank Schoby, of Algona, won first prize, a recognition pocket knife awarded by the Purina Mills of St. Louis, Claire Hansen, of Burt, won second; Verl Patterson, of Algona, Louis Price, of Lakota, and Sarah Burwash, of Fenton, won third, fourth and fifth respectively. .There were about 60 records kept in the county this year. These record books contain a story of the member's year in club work, an itemized account of all feed, labor, and other expenses on their calf for the year, Including a record for each month and an annual sum- NO RUSH OF DRIVERS TO GET NEW LICENSES Automobile drivers are not rushing to get licenses for only about 300 'have applied since the instructions for their issuance were received at the sheriff's office. There are ap- pro«imately 7300 automobiles In Kossuth county, and there should be at least 7300 owners getting licenses before the first of the year. In addition there are two and sometimes three or more drivers in a family, all of whom are required to apply for a driver's license, which costs only 25 cents. The owner's license is free. The total for Kossuth county is therefore estimated at 15,000 to be Issued before the first of the year. Up to Monday evening only 205 owners and 88 non-owners had applied. Owners must bring registration blanks with them when applying, but drivers do not need them- The registration blank Is to prove ownership. Workmen started emptying the swimming pool Monday afternoon and it had almost drained yesterday afternoon. The floor of the pool was scrubbed as the water drained to get out settlings of iron rust, which was in the water before the new filtering plant was put into operation. Next year the filtered water will make the pool clearer and will appear cleaner also. As soon as the water has drained a number of valves will be disconnected to let rainwater drain, and keep frost from freezing and bursting the valves. The water was drained into sewers, thence to run to the river a block and a half southeast of the pool. The pool was closed September 1, but the water had been left In it to prevent ex-- panslon or contraction by changing temperatures of September. Since the pool was closed six weeks ago a number of frogs and a few garter snakes have crawled Into the water. The snakes were soon drowned, but the frogs enjoyed the clear water. They were all removed in cleaning the pool. ALGONA WOMAN 25 YEARS AGO, IS DEAD Mrs. D. p. King, former Algon- ian, and a .sister of Mrs. E. H. Beardsley, died last week Thursday at the King home near Splvey, Kan. Burial was made at Kingman, Kan. Mrs. King had been sick for some time, and was not expected to recover, Mrs, Beardsley, Mrs. Frank Lowe, pf Vicksburg, Mich,, and Mrs. L. J. Clark, of Fort' Madison, all sister^, visited'. .Mrs. King only a> couple of weeks ago, making the trip from Algona in the Beardsley car. Mrs. King Is -a daughter of the late H. C. Parsons, who with die bygone o£ the youths ;wjy tem'pted":tb" drag them'out'of the car. ,A full confession was, made Tue day by John Skogobore, who wa* rested at Blue Earth, Minn., anftl who said Alvin Weber, 21, anfl Ev— eret Weber, two Fairmont youths,. fired the shots and he drove the car... The Webers, who are cousins, wer». captured at Fairmont Monday trhenc. Alvin appeared in a courtroom for* trial on charges brought by a youiut woman. Fairmont officers say both youths are under bonds awaitinc court action on liquor chargOK brought against them last spring. Charges Will Be Filet. It is understood that all three wflt be returned to Forest City, where, charges of resisting an officer and. use of. weapons with intent to kill, will probably be brought agalnit: them. . '• ' ' *{ The case has attracted much attention in Kossuth county, wbera» Montgomery is w e U known, and!e»~ pecially in the north end of ,ttMk' county. The wounding of SlwWfC- Brown, of Emmet county, the (Mali ',"« shooting of the sheriff at Fairmont., ,,; and this gun play at Forest City, fit fH within a few weeks, has cauM& alarm. > , } *| Mr, Montgomery has been night: and day marshal at Forest City'tar- seven years, before which he worteadi for the Standard Oil company UMZ«-. a number of years. lj MRS, LD, DICKINSON :j' IS 85; GIVEN PARTY Mrs. L. Dickinson her 85th birthday anniversary !•{•(; t Thursday night and the event '«M? celebrated by a family dinner "fcMfe- ^ en in her honor by Senator ! his brother M. de Parsons, was mary. SUIT FOR DAMA6EO BARBER POLE WIUJE APPMUO Suit brought by Shilts brothers against Dale Davidson, express truck driver was decided In favor of Davidson in Justice Winkers court Tuesday. The Sbllts Bros, shop a slc ed $80 damages for the electric barber pole outside their shop, which was knocked down in aew1 ^^ by P»v so wgtpgd thft j the iue to the di8tric,t court. It m *-. iwwyw, of St.' ^sdijjtl, ^pafrS^eT^y^ ^*>. v L. ^^b..«^«ra yrhAl^ hft LUTHERAN PASTORS TO CWI FOR MEETIN8JHERE SUNDAY All Lutheran congregations and pastors of the Algona Circuit of the Missouri Synod will meet at the local Lutheran church on Elm street Sunday afternoon at 2. The Rev. P. J. Braner is pastor of the Trinity church. In th^s meeting the various missions and needs are to be discussed. An interesting program will be oonclucted by the Rev. w- R- Kab.eUt5. of FeniQfi. Lutherans are invite^ to attend. Two Permits to Wfd, OR6ANIZATION OF P, T, A. HERE WILL BE DISCUSSED A meeting of all Interested In a Parent-Teacher Association for Algona has been called at the new school auditorium tomorrow evening at 8 o'clock. The object of the association is to bring into closer relation the parents and teachers for the training and education of children, Mrs. Ethel, CoUister, of . Spencer, chairman of the northwest district of the organization, will speak, and other talks are scheduled. F«Uow- Ing the talks an opportunity for questions will be had, and if enough interest is shown the organisation will be formed here(total jfjiil FATHER OF AL60NA WOMAN DIES SUDDENLY OF STROKE Mr. and Mrs. M, G. Norton re/> turned Tuesday night from Tipton, where they had been called Thursday night by news of the death Of Mrs. Norton's father, G;- W. Geiger. Mr. Geiger "suffened a stroke Thursday, and died that night at 8. He was 75 years old. Mr. Geiger was an attorney. Funeral services were conducted at. Tipton Monday, and burial was made there. Mrs. Geiger died a number of years ago. Mr. Geiger is survived by Mrs. Norton and three other daughters. Howe Talent Plauned. A home talent show Is to be given next month • under the auspices o< the Algona Community club, proceeds will be used to buy 9, for the f tage of the new where $ is to, be fiven, be announced, Jater, fl one of the early settlers in the Jrv- Ington neighborhood. Mr. King was a hardware merchant here up to as years ago, when toe sold his store then located where the Christensen store Is now, to B. A. Wolcott. The store has been continued, and is now owned by L, J. Nelson. Mr. King Is a brother of W. H. King, west of town. Mrs. King is survived by four sons and a daugii* ter. Open Hpuse »t Temple, The Masons will hold open house) at the ,new Masonic Temple all ..day tomorrow. A cordial invitation, is extended to visitors, whether members of the lodge or not. L. J. Dickinson =, at their Guests were Mrs. E, C. D and Mr. and Mrs. A. Hutchinon, birthday cake for the event w*» ! <)Wt-. '\. by Mrs. Dickinson. J She |s yeryl^o-j'^ tiv«s and interested in topics day despite her •»£«• She her days sowing and reading, Mrs, Dickinson and her the late L. D. Dickinson, this county in 19<MV and 12 yeajrs on a farm in Plum township, which Mrs, still owns. Mr. Dickinson, WhV'S a Civil war ve.teraj' " ' '* " and since,-then ijjrs.. made her home, Dickinsons,, when they' gomi, jmdl apends^he ;rw s-"»-r^cj=»»r- --i~: ~ — _ * " W~~^ «®?^,W*Sp«ftday R ' %MX®!.$®$& 9?m eohopl Uncle Dave 1$ Seriously HI at Home D. A. Haggard, familiarly known [ as "Pncle Dave,," is rfn,< h^is hojme Q& ffoP$$$QQ "'lW».TJ Poem

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