The News from Frederick, Maryland on June 10, 1970 · Page 24
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June 10, 1970

The News from Frederick, Maryland · Page 24

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Frederick, Maryland
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Wednesday, June 10, 1970
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KUsin' Wears Out, Cookin' Don't *·» 'Bussie Waiirt Ows, Kocha Dut Net' To June brides, the Pennsylvania Dutch women say, "buisto waiirt ows, kochadutnet-Qd*- aio* wear* out, cookln' don't)! So you girls who are walking down the aisle this June, take heed. Have a few trusty recipes, tried and true, and after the wedding trip, be ready with your cootin'-and your kissin'. At mis year's 21st Annual Pennsylvania Dutch Folk Festival at Kutztown, Pa., June 27 through July 5, expert cooks will «ain be putting their beat dishes forward* and among theirfamoua "·even sweets and seven sours" and substantial meat and potatoes, will be many to delight a new bridegroom's palate. Weiner Schnitzel (breaded veal cutlet), a long-time favorite with the men, is easy to make and hearty fare. WEINER SCHNITZEL (Breaded Veal Cutlet) Cut two pounds of veal steak one-half inch thick, in sizes for serving. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, dip in cracker or bread crumbs. Then dip in beaten egg and again in crumbs. Let stand five, minutes, then fry slowly on both sttes until brown. Sferfnkle with lemon Juice and garnish with a fried egg per portion, (try eggs in another pan and place on top of the veal steak just before serving). Easy - to - make corn muffins (without eggs) are another favorite among Pennsylvania Dutch cooks, and are sure to please husbands,-both new and old. EGOLESS CORN MUFFINS 1 cup cornmeal 1/2 cup flour 1/4 cup sugar 1 teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 cup milk 2 tablespoons melted shortening Sift and mix together the dry ingredients. Add the milk and shortening. Pour into greased muffin pans and bake in a moderate oven 350 degrees for 30 minutes. Winning Chicken Fathers deserve the best. And as we -make preparations for honoring them on Sunday, June 21, one of the most important .considerations should be the dinner menu for the day. The official dish for Father's Day is chicken. This is an ideal choice because good tasting chicken is also good for family well-being. It is low in calories, cholesterol and fat. In addition ONE BITE MEANS MORE1-A gay Dutch girl shows why the Pennsylvania Dutch shoo-fly pie has become a national favorite, -one bite and you want more! Shoo-fly pies will be only one of the "seven" sweets again featured at this year's 21st Pennsylvania Dutch Folk Festival at Kutztown, Pa., June 27 through JulyS. For Fathers to being an ideal food for weight watchers, it is helpful in preventing heart attacks and other coronary problems. Here is the prize recipe for Father's Day, 1970. ft is a National Chicken Cooking Contest winner that Chef Edmund Kaspar of New York's Americana Hotel has selected to be served at the Annual National Father of the Year Awards Luncheon. CHICKEN IMPERIAL 2 broiler-fryer chickens, halved 1-1/2 teaspoons salt 1/4 cup margarine 1/3 cup dry sherry 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce 1 teaspoon curry powder 1 teaspoon dried leaf oregano 1/2 teaspoon dry mustard 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/4 teaspoon paprika 1/8 teaspoon Tabasco pepper sauce Sprinkle both sides of chicken with salt. Place in large shallow baking pan. Mix remaining ingredients in small saucepan; stir over medium heat until margarine melts and mixture is smooth. Remove from heat; brush generously over chicken. Bake chicken in moderate oven (350 degrees) for 1 to 1-1/2 hours or until tender, basting and turning chicken every 10 to 15 minutes. Garnish with spiced peaches and parsley. Makes four servings. NOTE: For an extra flair prepare this recipe with boned chicken breasts. HEART DIET Good For You The Frederick Court? Heirt Association offers the following fat-controlled recipe. For additional information on heart diets, call 663-3189. SPECIAL STRAWBERRY ICE MILK (% cup: 150 calorie*) % cup vegetable oil 5 tablespoons non-fat milk solids ,, 1% cups hot skim milk ' l k teaspoon salt 1 package (10 ozO frozen strawberries 1 egg white Mix oil and nonfat milk solids in narrow small bowl. Add half a cup of the hot skim milk to make a paste. Beat at a high speed with an electric beater until an emulsion forms. Add remaining milk slowly, then beat a few seconds at high speed. Cool. Blend in tt -teaspoon salt and partially frozen berries. Pour into ice trays and freeze. When almost frozen, remove and beat well. Fold in stiffly beating egg white. Freeze well. Serves 6. (One package raspberries may be substituted for strawberries.) Dairy Princess 9 Favorite Recipe The 1969-70 American Dairy Princess, Frances Blspo, calls this lemon-accented dessert her favorite "dairy recipe. The combination of cottage cheese and cream cheese makes it a lighter- than-usual cheesecake. FRANCES BISPO'S CHEESECAKE - CRUST: 1 1 /2 ~ups graham cracker crumbs 2 tablespoons sugar '4 teaspoon cinnamon '4 teaspoon nutmeg 6 tablespoons I % stick) butter, melted FILLING: 5 eggs 1 cup sugar l ] /2 TMps cottage cheese 1 package (8 02.) cream cheese 1 package (3 of..) creuin oheese 2 teaspoons grated lemon peel 3 tablespoons lemon juice TOPPING: 1 cup dairy sour cream % cup toasted slivered almonds (optional) To prepare crust: In a bowl combine crumbs, sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg until well blended; stir in butter. Press mixture onto bottom and about three-fourths up sides of 9-inch cheesecake pan. Chill while preparing filling. To prepare filling: In a mixing bowl beat eggs until thick and foamy; gradually add sugar and continue beating until light and fluffy. Add cottage and cream cheeses; beat until smooth. Add lemon peel and juice. Pour into crust. Bake in preheated 350° oven 50 minutes or until a knife inserted near center comes out clean. Turn oven off. Spread top with sour cream; sprinkle with almonds, if desired. Leave cake in oven to cool to room temperature. Chill. Cheesecake may be served with fruit sauce, if desired. Tips On How To Keep Picnic Time Happy Time This is the llth in a series of articles by Carl Margrabe, Registered Sanitarian, Frederick County Health Department. Summertime picnic time is a gay time; let's keep it that way. Let's not approach vacation time with food-borne illnesses. A few simple precautions in the preparation and handling of foods and drinks can prevent many of the attacks of gastrointestinal upsets that sometimes follow out-of-door type parties. it is mainly a matter of good personal hygiene, temperature and insect control, and clean surfaces. In most cases of illness some individual has not practiced good personal hygiene or the temperature of the foods have not been kept cold enough or hot enough. Cold foods should be maintained at a temperature of 45 degrees or below and hot foods 150 degrees or above at all times. When the temperature our of doors or indoors hovers in the 80's or 90*s, these temperatures are ideal for the growth of germs (bacteria) such as Salmonella, Shigella, Staphylococcus Aureus, Clostridium Perfringens, Clostridium Botlinum, which are the main factors in food-borne illnesses and intoxications. A Barbecue On A June Day What is so rare as a day in June. -. .or a barbecue on a June day? Indeed, after those long indoor winter days, an outdoor meal seems to have unusual appeal. The family is together, the weather balmy, and nature obliging in her colorful foliage. So the menu, too, should be obliging, adding another dimension to the usual requirements of taste, nutrition and economy. An outdoor meal should be fun. "Finger food," for instance, like lamb spareribs, is a good beginning. And yams, a flavorful departure from the usual outdoor fare, are particularly appealing to the younger set when topped with crunchy corn chips. Easy- to-use canned Louisiana yams will make it fun for the cook, too. Lamb spareribs done on the grill come out brown and crusty and rich in flavor. This cut of Milk Fed Spring lamb is very economical and like other cuts of fresh American lamb takes well to a good sauce. Here they are boiled in seasoned, salted water before grilling to make them especially tender. Then lamb and yams are skewered for the grill and basted with the same tangy orange sauce. The mellow-sweet syrup from the canned yams forms the basis for the sauce, saving time as well is money. Golden Louisiana yams are packed at the peack of their flavor and freshness s o you can count on their excellent tast and smooth texture all year 'round. At another backyard buffet-or indoor summer meal--try Zesty Lamb Chops with Bayou Yams. This menu is really geared to Summertime Easy Lmri*. Just drain the canned yams and pop them into a brandy sauce and grill or broil the marinated lamb chops to desired degree of doneness. LOUBJANA YAM AND LAMB BARBECUE (Makes 6 servings) Boiling salted water 5 pounds lamb spareribs 3 parsley sprigs 1 tablespoon instant dices onion or 1 small onion, halved 2 cans (24 ounces each) Louisiana yams % teaspoon grated orange peel Vt cup orange juice 1 tablespoon cornstarch % teaspoon salt % teaspoon nutmeg 1% teaspoons lemon juice 1 teaspoon soy sauce 1 tablespoon butter Crushed corn chips Add enough boiling salted water to cover lamb, parsley and onion in large kettle. Cover and simmer 45 minutes, or until lamb is tender; drain. Drain yams, reserving l l /2 cups syrup. Combine reserved syrup, orange peel and juice in saucepan; simmer uncovered 10 minutes. Blend cornstarch and 1 tablespoon water; stir into orange mixture. Cook, stirring constantly, until sauce boils 1 minute. Add salt, nutmeg, lemon juic, soy sauce and butter. Brush spareribs with sauce and place on grill or broiler rack. Cook 4 inches from source of heat 8 minutes, turn and brush again. Place yams on skewers, brush with sauce and broil with spareribs 8 to 10 minutes or until lamb is well browned and yams are hot. Baste frequently with orange sauce. Arrange on platter. Sprinkle crushed corn chips over yams. Serve with remaining sauce and additional corn chips. ZESTY LAMB CHOPS (Makes 4 servings) 2 tablespoons chopped parsley --jJLJablespDons chopped onion 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 tablespoon salad oil 1 teaspoon hickory liquid smoke 2 tablespoons sugar J /2 teaspoon salt l k teaspoon pepper 4 shoulder lamb chops, 3 /4-inch thick Combine parsley, onion, lemon juice, salad oil, liquid smoke, sugar, salt and pepper; mix well. Add lamb chops. Chill 1 hour. Turn chops occasionally. Broil or grill chops 4 to 5 inches from source of heat, about 7 minutes on each side, or to desired degree of doneness. BAYOU YAMS (Makes 4 servings) % cup butter or margarine l /2 cup firmly-packed dark brown sugar 3 tablespoons brandy or orange juice % teaspoon salt 4 medium Louisiana yams, cooked, peeled and sliced or 2 cans (16 ounces each) Louisiana yams, drained 1 small navel orange, sliced and cut in wedges In large skillet melt butter; stir in sugar, brandy (or orange juice) and salt. Stir and bring to a boil. Add yams and top with orange wedges. Simmer, covered, 10 minutes, turning yams once. A BARBECUE ON A JUNE DAY-Fun food for your next outdoor meal: crusty and crunchy barbecued lamb spareribs and Louisiana yams. Weekday Supper Tarragon adds different and interesting flavor to kidney stew. Charlotte's Creamed Kidneys Tarragon Rice Peas and Carrots Salad Bowl Bread Tray Fruit Compote Beverage CHARLOTTE'S CREAMED KIDNEYS TARRAGON 2 tablespoons butter or margarine 1 medium onion, chopped 1 rib celery, diced 1 can (4 ounces) mushrooms, drained with liquid reserved 1*4 pounds beef kidney, cored and cut into small pieces Vz cup dry vermouth 1 bay leaf 2 teaspoons dried tarragon Vs teaspoon nutmeg Vs teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 1 teaspoon flour l k cup heavy cream In a 10-inch skillet over low heat melt the butter; add onion, celery and drained mushrooms; cook, stirring often, until onion and celery are softened. Add kidney and cook and stir until redness disappears. Add reserved mushroom liquid, vermouth, bay leaf, tarragon, nutmeg and Worcestershire; cover and simmer for about one hour. Gradually stir cream into flour, keeping smooth; add to skillet; stir constantly until thickened. Serve over toast. Makes four to six servings. The symptoms of the food-borne illnesses caused by the above- named bacteria may be nausea, vomiting, fever, diarrhea and cramps. ' _ · ' · · · It is possible that some of the foods you buy may be contaminated or contain bacteria in or on the food. It is extremely important that we do not add to this contamination or promote further growth by lack of refrigeration or heating or poor personal hygiene practices. An insulated chest is a good investment if one does much eating out. It is possible to maintain temperatures that will inhibit or prevent the growth of germs. With one of these chests it is possible to take all the ingredients for sandwiches or salads to the picnic. If sandwiches are prepared for any occasion beforehand, freeze the bread; this allows the spread or meat to remain cool and not have its temperature raised by warm bread. Sandwiches should be kept cool until eaten. Most salads that contribute to illness have been contaminated by hands, perhaps with an infection on the hand or solid hands. Remember, everyone should wash his hands, not only those involved in preparing the food, but also those who will eat it, We have found that wash-n-dri type packets clean the hands and have a germicidal ingredient that sanitizes the hands at the same time. Keep the desserts simple; custards and cream-filled pies are a potential hazard at any picnic. If used, they must be refrigerated until used. Fruit pies, cookies, plain cakes and fresh fruits are good desserts for outings. I DRINKS 9"" Bottled, canned drinks, tea or other beverages prepared in a thermos are usually safe to use. Avoid the use of unknown springs, wells, or streams for water, as they may be contaminated. Avoid the use of metallic containers, e.g. galvanized containers, or other fruit juice drinks, as the acid in the juice ' " metal to form a toxic substance that may lemonade and may react with cause illness. the INSECTS Remember the fly that lands on foods andpreparation surfaces. Flies frequently carry disease-causing organisms in their mouth parts, intestinal tract, and on their leg hairs and feet. Since flies are attracted to feces as well as food, they re a menace to food sanitation. As the fly feeds on the materials on which it alights, it periodically regurgitates liquid from the crop. This liquid may contain pathogens (germs) picked up from fecal material on which the animal fed previously. Food must be protected from flies at all times. Another thing to remember is to take along a covering for the picnic table - a table cloth or paper will protect the food from a contaminated surf ace that perhaps rodents have been walking over. Rodents also carry disease-producing organisms (germs). Use single service forks, spoons, napkins and plates. Dispose of them in containers designated for refuse or take them home for disposal into a sanitary landfill. If there are any "leftovers" from the picnic, be sure they are refrigerated immediately and kept refrigerated until used. A 24-hour limit is a good limit to keep leftovers. Remember, if in doubt, throw it out. In this way you may avoid a "tummy" ache. Have a happy summer, and good' eating! cMakea §ummer§alad THE CHEESE. Vt pound San Giorgio Elbow Macaroni, cooked and chilled · 2 medium cucumbers, peeled « 12 radishes · Vz Italian onion · Vz pound Swiss, American, or sharp Cheddar cheese · 1 large green pepper · Va cup sour cream « salt and pepper · Yi teaspoon lemon juice · 1 tablespoon chopped parsley. Cut all vegetables and cheese into uniform- sized cubes. Toss lightly with macaroni and sour cream mixed with salt, pepper, and lemon juice. Serve in well chilled bowl garnished with chopped parsley. Serves 4. Do "THE CHEESE". Will slfet Off 3*. E L B O W MACARONI ASubriUvyof ffc IWFMMy FOOCM / PaffeC-2 FOODPAGE THE NEWS, Frederick, Marytan* Week's Food Economies June is the month when more fresh fruits seasonally appear* The peak has passed for local strawberries but supplies are arriving from near by states. North Carolina blueberries are more plentiful. Georgia peaches are available. From California we are getting apricots, Bing Cherries, and the first of the season Perlette grapes* Western cantaloupe and Florida watermelon are increasing in volume. Use lots of dairy products during June in your menus in an eye appealing, taste tempting way. At the dairy counters there will be a bounty of all dairy products, whole milk, buttermilk, skim milk, butter, cottage cheese, yogurt, cheese, instant nonfat dry milk, evaporated milk, condensed milk, flavored milks, half and half, whipping cream, ice cream and ice milk. As food prices continue to rise, dairy products become more a bargain and a means of extending the family food budget. Typical of today's excellent buys is cottage cheese. The high protein content and the low cost per pound places cottage cheese on the list of low-cost, high- value foods. There is a form of cottage cheese for you, whether you cook it, mix it with other foods, or serve it just as it comes from the container, dry cottage cheese is fat free, no cream dressing or seasonings added. Creamed cottage cheese has salt, sweet pasteurized cream dressing for moisture which is approximately fourper- cent milk fat. One half cup of creamed cottage cheese contains 120 calories. One half cup of dry cottage cheese contains 108 calories. Small curd sometimes called country style has firm curds that hold together in shape for salads or fruit toppings. The large curd style is a softer curd preferred by some for cooking* Cottage cheese is perishable. To be sure it is fresh buy it only from a refrigerated dairy case. Refrigerate cheese at home and use it within a day or two after buying. Keep covered as it picks up odors from other foods. Remember if you do not drink your quota of milk, one pound of cottage cheese contains as much protein as two and one half Quarts of milk or twelve ounces of creamed cottage cheese gives the calcium equivalent of one half pint of milk. June is the month when small fruits start coming to market and these combine very well with cottage cheese or other dairy products. The local strawberry season peak has just passed and we are starting to get berries from near by states. Blueberries are coming from North Carolina and prices decline as supplies increase. Dark red sweet cherries and a few plums and the first of the season Perlette grapes are coming from California. The fresh apricot season has started. Georgia peaches are available but not in volume. Most western cantaloupes are coming to market. The watermelon season in Florida is at its peak. While these small fruits normally are moderate to high in cost a few added to salads, desserts or toppings on cereal or ice cream will make meals eye and taste appealing. FLUFFY COTTAGE CHEESE- BLUE CHEESE DRESSING 1 cup cottage cheese 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1/4 teaspoon onion salt (Beat these ingredients until smooth) ADD: 1/4 cup water 1/4 cup dry milk (Beat until fluffy) BLEND: 1/4 cop crumbled Blue cheese (Will keep about 1 week) MORTON'S POT PUS BEEF. CHICKEN 01 TURKEY) 3 §.,,, P i« 83* IDEAL WHITE VINEGAR .P , bo , 17' .-,, bo, 27' IDEAL CIDER VINEGAR i ,,· b.t 22 i ,,. t»t 29' WHITE HOUSE RED GRAPE VINEGAR I. P , bo,.25' NABISCO OREO COOKIES is-,. P k 9 .49' NABISCO SOCIAL TEA SANDWICHES is-o, P k 9 49' NABISCO OATMEAL COOKIES i-ib. P k 9 .49' NABISCO RITZ CRACKERS ia-. . P k 9 39' SARA LEE RAISIN POUND CAKES i2..,. P k 9 . 79' SARA LEE CHOCOLATE SWIRL CAKES 12-., P k 9 . 79' MORTON'S PARKERHOUSE ROLLS ».iV P k 9 39' MORTON'S POWDERED DONUTS .o. OI pkg 39- PRELL LIQUID SH AMPOO 7-0, .bo, .93' PRELL CONCENTRATE SHAMPO011 OFF .. . 5 -«,,. ,»b. $1.11 CHUN KING FRIED RICE w/CHICKEN . . . . 13',-.,. » n 59' CHUN KING SOYA SAUCE s-« b.,.29' CHUN KING CHOW MEIN NOODLES * Bamboo Shooft . 2'j-oi. eon 33* CHUN KING Cemfonese Chick. CHOW MEIN . 2-lb., II.or con $1.05 CHUN KING BEEF CHOW MEIN o,v P0 c* . 2-ib.. 11... can $1.05 CHUN KING MUSH. CHOW MEIN o,v P o,k a*., n... »» $1.05 CHUN KING SHRIMP CHOW MEIN D,,poc* . . 2-lb.. 11-o.. ear, $1.05 LUCKY LEAF APPLE PIE FILLING i-ib..6-0,.can 39' LUCKY LEAF BLUEBERRY PIE FILLING .. 1-1... 6-0, on 49' LUCKY LEAF CHERRY PIE FILLING i-,b..6-0,.can59' LUCKY LEAF LEMON PIE FILLING i-ib,6-o,.«,n39' NESTLE'S CHOCOLATE QUIK 2-ib.,an9S' MARTHA WHITE SPUD FLAKES. .'. 2-.. P k 9 10' MARTHA WHITE FIAPSTAX 2v,+*. P k 9 ,.23' MARTHA WHITE BIXMIX 26... P k 9 * 23' MARTHA WHITE CORN MUFFIN MIX . . 27,-., P k 9 , 23' MARTHA WHITE CORN BREAD MIX ... 2 6 ·,.., P k 9 , 23' VANISH BOWL CLEANER i-.-.b..an39' VANISH BOWL CLEANER 2-.b,2^..an59' RENUZIT SPRAY STARCH s OFF is.., c.,,44' RENUZIT SPRAY STARCH 7 OFF i',. P , c .n50' RENUZIT LEMON FURNITURE WAX 9-TM.,«n75« SWEETENER.... Sweet 'N Low 20' OFF! Tetley Tea Bags ^ SKIPPY Peanut Butter 'lb *r 69 ACME VALUE! Efferdent Tablets j 99 0 0 0 TECHMATIC tlt*ft* J100 5 super stainless steel edges KEIBLiR 'RED TAf' COOKIE SALE 010 FASH. SUGAR IMt. 100 fritn Effective Thru Sol.. Jun* 13. 1970. Quantity light* *ei»rvt4. SPAPERf

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