The Des Moines Register from Des Moines, Iowa on July 28, 1969 · Page 8
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July 28, 1969

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The Des Moines Register from Des Moines, Iowa · Page 8

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Des Moines, Iowa
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Monday, July 28, 1969
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Page 8
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Negroes See Race Bias in Farm Policy By Nick Kotz (Of Th» R*fll'ster'» Washington Burtau) WASHINGTON, D.C. — Civil rights leaders from eight southern states have charged the U.S. Department of Agriculture with continued discrimination in services to Negroes. Speaking for advisory commissions to the U.S. Civil Rights Commission from throughout the South, Dr. Vivian W. Henderson accused the Agriculture Department of sharing responsibility for urban unrest. "By failing to assume responsibility for the human consequences of its past and current actions," Henderson said, "the Department of Agriculture has contributed to the conditions which result in urban unrest. For the urban unrest which our country is experiencing today had its roots in rural conditions which left many Negroes destitute and dependent, with no alternative but to seek equal opportunity elsewhere." ^ Details Charges Henderson, who is president of Clark College in Atlanta, Ga., detailed the following charges. The co-operative Extension Service programs are operated in segregated and unequal manner. Farmers Home Administration loans to Negroes continued to be disproportionate to their needs both in terms of purpose and amount. Negroes are not receiving the full benefits of food programs proportionate to their needs, with only 16 per cent of the rural poor receiving federal food aid and many more Negro than white students being denied assistance of the National School Lunch Program. Employment discrimination is widespread in agriculture programs. Minority group rural residents do not enjoy equal access to and participation in decision-making regarding agriculture programs. "There has been minimal progress in eliminating these long-standing conditions," said Henderson. "The Agriculture Department Is least responsive to the little man and especially to the minority group resident." Urge Policy Shift Speaking for the advisory commissions, Henderson said REGISTER PHOTO A Silver Dome for the Fair Members of Sheet Metal Workers Local No. 45 Saturday put the finishing ( touches on a geodesic dome to be on display at the Iowa State Fair, which opens Aug. 15. Working on the dome constructed of sheet aluminum at the home of Donald Thompson, 2928 Indianapolis ave., are from left: Norm Leyh, Thompson and Frank Hermann. The dome measures nearly 14 feet high, is 20 feet across, weighs about 700 pounds and took almost 120 hours to build. YOUNG: END QUIET TACTICS WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) Complaining that efforts at quit persuasion haven't always worked, WhiU ncy M. Young, jr., announced Sunday that his National Urban League might be using more con frontatlon tactics in the future. The League's eiecutive director told a news conference his group has been "very polite in challenging the institutions," but often "nothing happened." "Apparently," he said, "the institutions don't respond to an intelligent overview of historical data . . .they only respond that the Agriculture Department must develop a policy and programs which are specifically designed to relate to low- income persons, especially in the areas of economic development, rural housing, and self- help co-operative efforts. Farm subsidies must be made more equitable, he said, and the credit programs for small farmers must be greatly expanded. If federal-state programs cannot be made to work without discrimination, be said, federalizing of employes should be considered. "There is no justifiable reason for segregation hi extension services," he said. "There is no justifiable reason for differentials in rates of participation in food programs. And finally, there is no justifiable reason for the discrimination in employment or in participation in d e c i s i o n-making which now characterize many Agriculture Department programs." Henderson noted that in the 35-year history of the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service (ASCS) county committee system for administering farm programs only one Negro has ever been elected to any of the 4,000 positions as county committeeman in the He also pointed out that Negroes are rarely found in other decision-making bodies that decide locally who will get Agriculture Department benefits. Reasons for Failure Henderson said the Agriculture Department has achieved only minimal progress in-eliminating discrimination because: The rural constituency of the department is basically conservative in economics, politics and social change. The department Is more responsive to powerful commercial agriculture interests who historically have opposed programs which would benefit the low-income farmer and rural resident. The department bureaucracy, with its peculiar reliance upon acquiesence to local control, has a built-in inertia which resists change. The agricultural committees of Congress, which are controlled by southern conservatives and segregationists, have great influence on administration of programs. TYPHOON VIOLA MANILA, PHILIPPINES (AP) — Seven persons drowned Saturday when Typhoon Viola's strong winds capsized their boat in central Philippine waters, the Philippine news service reported Sunday night. Sixteen other passengers~of the boat swam to shore and survived. WHITNIY YOUNO, JR. to some kind of confrontation." GnMellnei to the type of confrontation tactics that might be used are contained In a three-page mimeographed position paper which Yowig said would be presented to an anticipated 3,OM delegates assembling for the start today of the League's aantal conference. It endorses "a wide range of non-violent, legally sanctioned activities ranging from meet* ings to boycotts, picketing, and other strategies for* change," bound primarily by the necessity for the League to keep Its status as a tax-exempt organization. A vote from the Delegate Assembly is required before It can become official policy. The Assembly meets Wednesday. "Only a few years' ago we thought picketing and boycotting was a pretty militant activity," Young told newsmen. "We have seen that picketing and boycotting are really pretty nice alternatives compared to some of the alternatives. "Our methods haven't worked always," he continued, "the systems haven't chafefe*. Back In 1*3 we called for a domestic Marshall Plan. We siM you can cad It reparations ...' or whatever you want. We like to call tt a Marshall Plan." It was presented "very nicely" to government and industry and business leaders, Young said, but nothing happened. All signs point to a stormy session In Which the chief topic will be how blacks can gain control of their own neighborhoods. VoMf told newsmen he did not want to dtoeiss In advance tto kapeta speech this •urnMav or Ha clrfl rights and srtau affairs policies of fe NhaMtataMratlon. But sources close to the tatto'siid he will urge a Jrastte cutback In the space program, now Chat man has set foot on the moon. D»s Molna» Register Man.. July M, I W Start Procedures TO Stop Funds WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) Procedures have been initiated toward cutting off federal funds to Stuttgart School District 22 in Arkansas unless Its two all- Negro schools are desegregated this school year, the federal Office of Civil Rights said Saturday. A spokesman said the district's Lincoln Park and Hoi- man elementary schools remain all-Negro and that It's desegregation plan has resulted in only 100 of the area's 1,050 Negro students attending previously all-white schools. . The Office of Civil Rights began administrative piuejjsfta this week toward cutoff of Hie district's federal funds unless the two Negro schools jrt desegregated, the spokesman said. Fatal Gunfight In Medicine Hat MEDICINE HAT, ALBERTA, CANADA (AP) - A gunman was seriously wounded early Saturday in a gun fight at a shopping center here. Before the shooting erupted, five policemen and six civilians were held hostage. Police were called about 2 a.m. to investigate a break-in at the shopping center. When four policemen arrived they were held at gunpoint by two men, who forced them to carry a safe from the supermarket to a car. Chief Constable Sam Drader arrived and he too was taken hostage. As he explained it later, the police "were unable to use force without endangering their mates." Six civilians, passing in their cars, were stopped and held hostage too. One reported the gunmen, "said they would get even with the police for kicking them around before." JAPANESE TRAIN CRASH TOKYO, JAPAN (AP) - One hundred and sixty-two Japanese were injured, 10 of them seriously, when a crowded express train heading for Tokyo | rammed into the back of another train Sunday, police reported. last twenty years, one newspaper won more Pulitzer Prizes than Moines Register •OLOR YOUR SUMMER DINING WITH THE FROM DES MOINES SAVINGS! Our Congratulations to The New York Times This handsome set of six big 12-oz. insulated "hot 'n cold" tumblers from West Bend, In your choice of FOUR fashion-bright, fade-proof colors ... Free when you save $100 at De» Moines Savingsl Double-wall insulation helps every hostess "keep 'em happy"—hot beverages are always steaming; cold drinks stay icy! Available In four dishwasher-safe colors: Fern, Pineapple, Tiger Lily or Antique Gold. Select all one color, or mix and match. *>••» -. ...or gut this lovely.cookware OR R El This beautiful one-quart decorated saucepan is the very latest In fatWontd-dsslgMd tMhautt AhfitlMS\Alu AMAA U^IAH ywH» awRNHiav "•a wnen wBWw^pPa inVHV i" v|^Mll W U^v Del GiroBiBypimefn-to-bright blue end grtan to putty Stilnltsi steel rim Get one of these summertime Party Pleasers FREE... now during July! Either one is yours as a gift from Des Moines Savings when you add $100 to your present account, or open a new account for $100! (Other pieces of Del Coronado Cookware are also available from Des Moines Savings. Ask our nice-to- know people for details.) Saving at Des Moines Savings means your money earns the highest rate allowed by law,,, 4%% on passbook savings and 5*/4% on Certificates, compounded semi-annually. This exciting new gift offer (s feed eily tfwiag July, so save NOW at any of Des Moines Savings' four convenient locations. Mail orders, add $ffor postage and handling. AND LOAN ASSOCIATION AMES: 525 Main St. DES MOINES: 6th & Mulberry INDIANOLA: Howard & Salem WEST DES MOINES: 401 Grand

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