The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on March 12, 1968 · Page 6
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March 12, 1968

The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 6

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Algona, Iowa
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Tuesday, March 12, 1968
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Page 6
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6-Algono (la.) Upper Des Moines Tuesday, March 12, 1968 •MKMIMji'iifli • -;^.<J8BBWaaW2aW!3H»'9WK'3flaRt>fliHWflB^^ I FARM PAGE •MX ~-~-•*- -* t^H** -OHK^ '^l^M^^'tflM > mttMfB''-t^flHtf2SK9HV > 'AflM^MMtf* iflMM»aM| JwC'^OVGs ?Qw^ 7QHK*^flHW'^r)VK>nn>HKVM4n£a'aVVX i ioPBC«:9fVviX-'/WaK: : /9P i Support Loan Maturity Dates Are Announced Maturity dates for price-support loans on 1967-crop grains and similarly handled commodities are the same as for 1966 crops, R. L Anderson, chairman, Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation county committee has announced. Price support loans on eligible commodities will be available up to one month before the loan maturity dates. If not placed under loan, such commodities may be sold to the Commodity Credit Corporation if the farmer notifies the ASCS county office before the loan maturity dates. Written requests to reseal eligible 1967 crops under extended loans, in both farm and warehouse storage, should also be filed with the county office not later than the loan maturity dates. The 1967 crops eligible for reseal are wheat, corn, barley, oats, grain sorghum and soybeans. Reseal loans on older crops, 1964, 1965 and 1966, which are stored on farms will be extended automatically without the filing of a request; the written request requirement applies only to the reseal of eligible 1967 crops. The maturity dates for 1967- crop commodities placed under price- support loans are: April 30, 1968; barley, flaxseed, oats, rye, and wheat; July 31. 1968; corn, sorghum, and soybeans. 5 DEVELOPMENTS £ S FROMDEVALOIS • Question — For highest yields, which do you recommend, drilled corn or power checked? Answer -To take maximum advantage of the yield potential of modern corn hybrids, drilling the seed is a much safer bet for corn planting than "hill dropping." Drilling, or single plant spacing, was recently compared to hill dropping in Illinois tests. Agronomists there compared yield per acre of drilled corn versus two, three and four plants per hill in 30 inch rows at 24,000 plants per acre. The drilled corn yielded 11 bushels more per acre than corn planted at two plants per hill. Drilled corn yielded 12 bushels more than three plants per hill and 23 bushels more per acre than corned planted four plants per hill. You'll also get fewer barren stalks when you drill corn. Lodg- ing, however, may be a problem. So, if you drill, be sure to select varieties with good standability. * * * The well-known Kossuth county Beef Producer's banquet will be Thursday, April 4. Excellent food and program are lined up. Get your tickets from a director or at the Extension office. * * * Farm couples of the age of about 21 to 40 are invited to attend a Farm & Home Management School on Thursdays, March 21 and 28 from 1:15 to 3:15 p.m. at the Extension office. The workshop will teach man. agement principles, using records and analysis to increase income, use of credit in the farm and home and other topics. The school will be taught by Wm. Turner, Extension Area Farm Management specialist and myself. Contact the Extension office if you wish anymore information on this meeting. BUIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIimillllllllllllllllB | RAMBLINGS | 1 FROM RUTH | ffiminiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuB Is your youth group looking for an idea for a community service project? Then you might be interested in a movie showing ways in which young people in other parts of the country are helping their communities. A sound film is available showing youth in action as they help to meet the challenge of President and Mr s.John- son for a more beautiful America. Last year a number of youth organizations in the country held a National Youth Conference on Natural Beauty and Conservation. Organizations that were involved that have local groups are the Boy Scouts, 4-H, FFA, FHA and Girl Scouts. A 25-minute movie "We're on Our Way" was made of the conference and of a number of activities of young people around the country. Some of the activities shown are a community improvement project in Watts, the controlling of highway litter in Louisiana, and the building of a county park in Washington. Copies of the movie are available free to youth groups. Organizations that participated in the conference have copies available at their national headquarters. Others can book showings from the JAM HANDY ORGANIZATION FILM DISTRIBUTING DEPT,, 2821 E, Grand Blvd., Detroit, Mich., or check with a Coca Cola bottling company. Schools may request free showing from - Audio-Visual Service, Eastman Kodak Co., 343 State St., Rochester, New York 14650. Adult groups that would like to show the film as a program on youth may request copies for a small rental fee from the JAM HANDY ORGANIZATION FILM DISTRIBUTING DEPARTMENT. MEMOS FROM MARGARET Most of us like to stretch dollars when shopping for food, home furnishings and equipment. But, making wise choices so we can get our money's worth is only the first step in stretching dollars. Making wise use of items is even more important. This calls for thinking ahead for the purposes the item will serve and then keeping it in good condition. Let's apply this to clothing for the family by using the following plan: Twice a year look over the family's clothes - see what can be saved, altered or repaired or handed down. Now look at where you need to fill in by thinking of the many different occasions clothes are needed - home, school, dress up, church and on- the-job. Now, knowing what clothes need to be bought decide how much you can afford to pay - then make a list and start looking in the papers, store windows, etc. When you do go shopping, look for clothes that are suitable for more than one purpose — for example a skirt that can be worn to school or dress up. Always read the label to know what the garment is made of, to know the size as well as what care it will need. See what is said about shrinkage, too. Tightly woven fabrics or knits usually wear well and won't lose their shape. Knitted clothes usually shrink some when washed, so consider buying one size larger than usual. Garments that are well made and worth the money have no breaks in the thread in the seams, or at the collar, pockets or buttonholes. Plan to put more money into those garments that will be worn the most - coats, jacket suits, shoes. Shirts, blouses and skirts can be purchased inexpensively and changed more often. There are some handy little booklets which give ideas in buying children's clothes. They are called "Pocketbook Notes." You can get these from the Extension Office at 1306 N. Main, Algona. Iowa Marketing Board Promotes Grain Overseas The Iowa Agricultural Marketing Board has made a $5,250 contract with the Iowa Corn Growers Association to promote feed grains through market development work for a 12-month period beginning Jan. 1, 1968. The contract was announced jointly by Dale Awtry, director of the marketing division; Keith Wilson, Iowa City, chairman of the marketing board; and Roscoe Marsden, Ames, who represents the Iowa Corn Growers Association on the Iowa Marketing Board. The Iowa Corn Growers is .an affiliate of the National Corn Growers Association. Plans are for the funds to be (Channeled into the international market development work of the Iowa and the National Corn Growers Associations. Their marketing efforts range from livestock and poultry production projects to (consumer promotion of meats, milk and eggs in foreign countries. In recent years, these projects have also included quality control on U. S. corn going overseas and assistance to foreign buyers in obtaining the right kinds and grades of high quality U. S. corn The additional funds now being provided by the Iowa Agricultural Marketing Division will assist in intensifying and broadening the worldwide corn market development program. This market development program is being conducted by the U. S. Feed Grains Council, the foreign market development agency representing the Iowa and the National Corn Growers Associations. Seven overseas offices currently administer the program in 16 countries. NO NEED TO COME IN TODAY DUEL WITH YOU INCOME TAX The point is—unless you hove special training for this match, the odds are against you. But you always win when you let BLOCK do your dueling. Your prize—a complete and accurate return. You avoid worry, save time, often save money. Get the point? America's Largest Tax Service with Over 2000 Offices 1108 N. Hoore GUARANTEE We guarantee accurate preparation of every tax return. If we make any errors that cost you any penalty or interest, we will pay the penalty or interest. HOURS WEEKDAYS: 9-5 - PHONE 295-5531 NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY CHOPPER GREEN CHOPS NON-STOP! The Gehl FC-72 Flail Chopper breezes through the heaviest green chop . . . cuts a six-foot swath, rain or shine! Compared to grazing, the Gehl 72 can double the usable feed per acre. Provide your cows with the lush, fresh feed they need for top, consistent production. Downtime repairs? No problem! The Gehl 72 is the most trouble-free chopper made. Features include: 1. 39 RevtrsiW* Flails (Full six- foot cut). 2. Unsized Knives and Fan Blades. 3. Easy Knife Adjustment. Plus ... Easy-Swing drawbar that gives you four positions (3 offset. 1 transport). 'Call us today for a free demonstration—or come in and aee the FC-72 yourself. Financing available, GEHL Make in Prove it with a Pe*onstratioM JOE BRADLEY EQUIPMENT

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