The Daily Herald from Provo, Utah on April 13, 1975 · Page 23
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April 13, 1975

The Daily Herald from Provo, Utah · Page 23

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Provo, Utah
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Sunday, April 13, 1975
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Page 23
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Pace 24-THE HERALD, Proyo, Utah, Sunday, April 13, 1975 HOT DOCS EVERYBODY'S FAVORITE!!! IMPROMPTU JAM SESSION is held by two "street musicians" in New Orleans' Jackson Square where curious passersby pause for a moment during the warm spring weather. Bonn Shrugs at Its Terrorists BONN - (LENS) - West Germany, a haven of peace and quiet until the so-called extra- parliamentary opposition went on the rampage in the late 1960s, has been shaken by political terrorism ever since. No sooner were the ringleaders of the Baader- Meinhof group of urban guerrillas rounded up in the summer of 1972 than the Palestinian Black September organization stormed its way into the Israeli quarters at the Olympic games in Munich, an action which ended some 15 hours later in a bloodbath. With the murder of a West Berlin judge last November in true IRA style and the kidnapping of West Berlin's Unemployed in New York Protest Illegal Aliens NEW YORK - (LENS) With unemployment running at over 10 per cent in New York City and the entire state of New Jersey, a considerable stir has arisen over illegal immigrants in the area. The construction workers' union has protested that illegal aliens are robbing them of jobs, while other critics charge that they are a drain on welfare agencies. New Jersey's Representative Peter Rodino, the powerful chairman of the Judiciary committee of the House of Representatives, has proposed legislation that would compel employers to check on the status of their workers, with escalating penalties for those who knowingly hire illegal aliens. His bill has drawn increasing support from trade unions and patriotic groups, which bandy about scare figures of the numbers of illegal immigrants and the jobs that they are taking from American citizens. Their opponents, including religious organizations and civil libertarians, are just as cavalier in their use of statistics and their claims that aliens are being discriminated Lib Group Aims at New Goal ANN ARBOR, Mich. (UPI) Women's Lib may have new ground to conquer —the Saturday morning cartoon shows. A female researcher at the University of Michigan says a study of 20 programs from such series as "Fat Albert,""Underdog" and "The Flintstones," concluded cartoons still are entrenched firmly in the traditional male-female sex roles. "If television serves as a reflector of society, then females are indeed the 'second sex,'" said Dr. Linda Busby. The males were seen in 42 job roles, while the females appeared in only nine, Dr. Busby said. The male jobs spanned the hierarchy from professional to blue collar status. Female jobs, were mostly uniquely "femine" jobs, such as maid, nurse, beauty 'contestant, or bake-off contest director. The characters represented all . age groups and walks of life and the settings ranged from prehistoric times to an underwater colony in the 21st century, she said. "The number of cartoon women in the labor force certainly does not parallel the number of working women in the real world," Dr. Busby said. /'While approximately 50 per , cent of all American women are ' in the labor force, only six of the '31 cartoon women had jobs outside the home. Only one was , briefly shown in any position of authority. against. The very nature of this "silent invasion" makes trustworthy statistics hard to come by. The furor over alien immigration stems largely from the mounting ranks of the jobless in the New York metropolitan area. But ever since the passage of the immigration act of 1965, which abolished quotas but set an overall limit of 120,000 immigrants a year from the Western hemisphere, the number of illegal entrants has been rising. The main reason is that to be admitted legally aliens are required to have a specific job to go to. Immigration, legal and illegal, has also been stimulated by cheap air travel, and the rising population and unemployment in the Caribbean and Latin America, as well as a growing realization that the undermanned enforcement agency rarely catches up with illegal entrants. There is no hard evidence that illegal immigrants are taking jobs in substantial numbers from legal immigrants or native-born Americans. Nor is there much truth in the proposition that they are working at substandard wages. What does appear clear is that they are working at menial or disagreeable jobs that most Americans will not take. Both legal and illegal aliens are an important source of domestics and workers in restaurant kitchens and in other unskilled and low-paying occupations. They are no menace to most trade unions, which regulate their memberships rigidly. The unions are under pressure to admit more members of minority groups, particularly blacks and Puerto Ricans, who are among the hardest hit by unemployment. But the slump in construction is a greater barrier to employment of minority workers than the unions themselves. Joblessness is especially acute among black teenagers, with 40 per cent out of work. The plight of black women is about as bad. Most black American females, including the vast majority in the 18-25 age bracket, simply refuse to work in domestic service, which they regard as demeaning as well as poorly paid. This is the gap that alien workers, especially Latin American women, have helped to fill. Despite its well advertised troubles, New York City remains a magnet for immigrants, whether from other parts of the country or from abroad. It is, after all, a thriving ethnic center with large colonies of southern blacks, Jamaicans, Haitians and Trinidadians. It also provides considerable welfare benefits or social assistance to those who can qualify and even for those who resort to stolen or forged identities. Although there has been a shrinkage in job opportunities, it is still possible for the unskilled to get either work or public assistance. Christian Democratic leader in February, the maintenance, or rather the restoration, of law and order is again a central issue in West German politics. Contrary to expectations, the public has not been stampeded into reacting against the government, helpless as it appeared when held to ransom by Herr Lorenz's captors. The kidnapping gave only a marginal boost to Herr Lorenz's party in the West Berlin election, and had still less influence on the election in the Rhineland Palatinate a week later. An opinion poll showed that 56 per cent of Germans approved of the decision to give in to the terrorists, a surrender which had the consent of all the political parties and of the state governments. Most Germans still sleep soundly in their beds. Asked in another poll if they felt their personal security was endangered by political terrorists, 52.8 per cent answered "not at all," 25 per cent "hardly" and only 14 per cent said they felt somewhat at risk. A Bundestag debate on internal security ended abruptly at midnight on March 13th when opposition deputies walked out of the chamber in protest against the description of Herr Strauss as an "intellectual terrorist" by the parliamentary leader of the Social Democrats, Herr Wehner. But for the most part the discussion was not unduly heated. The opposition's attack rested mainly on the allegation that the government had minimized the dangers of terrorism and was forever closing the stable door after the horse had bolted. But nobody could dispute the chancellor's statement that a democratic state cannot offer absolute protection from terrorism and the violent deeds of anarchists. Not even military and police dictatorships were able to do that, he added. The task of the police and other security organizations in West Germany is complicated by the federal police force; each state has its own force, under the control of the state ministry of the interior. There is a federal office for the protection of the constitution whose task is counterespionage but in deference to the autonomy of the states each has its own, similar, organization. There is also a federal criminal investigation department (CID); four years ago, when the Baader Meinhof group was showing its teeth, the federal CID was given the task of investigating crimes of violence committed by anarchists. Its staff has increased from some 990 in 1969 to 2,400, and in the same period its expenditure has gone up six- fold. How great is the threat to law .and order which these considerable forces have to meet? The membership of anarchist groups was put at some 500 at the end of 1973, six times more than in 1970. One must assume it has grown at least at a similar pace in the past year. Crime hardly increased at all in 1973, a unique stagnation, and although the figures for last year are not yet complete it looks as though cases of murder and manslaughter went up by only 1.2 per cent. Some 90 per cent of violent .criminals, including those who are politically motivated, are caught, whereas only 45.6 per cent of all crimes are solved. The kidnappers of Herr Lorenz proved again that a small group of terrorists is capable of bringing a country to its knees. But that country is not yet ready to react, as the terrorists undoubtedly wanted, by proclaiming a state of emergency. , GROUND LOW Discount REGULAR GRIND GROUND DAILY TO GUARANTEE FRESHNESS . _ LB. ALL MEAT WIENERS A & R BRAND 20-COUNT PKG. HAMBURGER & HOT DOG BUNS BAKED DAILY IN OUR MODERN IN-STORE BAKERIES PACK FOR ONLY CHUNK STYLE BOLOGNA- . 79 X-L-N-T BRAND BURRITOS 4 1 HASH BROWNS LYNDEN FARM 2-LB. PKG. BLUE BONNET MARGARINE 1-LB. PKG. Bonus Buy! GARBAGE CANS 30-GAL METAL W/LID , ASPARAGUS U. S. NO 1 ALL GREEN MEDIUM SIZE m ^ LARGE SIZE ASPARAGUS All Green Farm Fresh Ib. WE'RE OPEN 24 HRS. A DAY EXCEPT: Cottonwood Mall. Cenlervllle and Tooele. Somethings always on sale at BREAD PRICES NOT EFFECTIVE AT 7TH E. & 33RD S. STORE .., S.LC. OR CANYON ROAD STORE ... PRQVQ. BAKERY PRICES NOT EFFECTIVE IN CEOAR CITY STORE. PRICES EFFECTIVE APRIL 14TH THRU 16TH 1975,

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