The Daily Herald from Provo, Utah on April 10, 1975 · Page 41
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April 10, 1975

The Daily Herald from Provo, Utah · Page 41

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Provo, Utah
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Thursday, April 10, 1975
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Page 41
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Collector's Ford Medal The Lighter Side Thursday, April 10, 1975, THE HERALD, Provo, Utah-Page 41 A Gerald R. Ford medal, the 37th in a series commemorating each of the presidents of the United States, is being offered by Presidential Art Medals, Inc., of Vandalia, Ohio. The obverse features the portrait of President Ford and the reverse depicts the presidential seal. The medal is the same high relief in design as the 36 previously issued in the presidential series, created by the late Ralph J. Menconi, who was known as the sculptor of presidents. The Ford medal is the work of sculptor Edward Dewitt. At one-and-a-quarter inch in diameter the Ford art medal compliments the previously released medals in the series. The silver issue is serially numbered and limited to 6,500 pieces priced at $15.75. The unnumbered antique bronze specimens are priced at $4.00. by Mort Reed For the collector of larger medals, the Ford presidential series is also available in a two- and-a-half inch diameter issue. Limited to 6,500 serially numbered pure silver medals, th larger medal sells for $86.50 each with unnumbered bronze of the same size selling for $8.10. A discriptive pamphlet accompanies each medal. Interested readers may write R. James Harper, Presidential Art Medal, Inc., 300 West National Road, Vandalia, Ohio 45377. TO ORDER FOREIGN COINS The 10th edition of "How to Order Foreign Coins" published by the editors of "World Coins" has just been released. It lists in alphabetical order 140 countries which offer (or fail to offer) coin and paper money sales to collectors. For instance, should a collector wish to obtain coins of England, for $8.95 he can order a set of six decimal coins dated 1971 in proof condition from the Royal Mint of Great Britain, North American Bureau, P.O.Box 700, Benjamin Franklin Station Washington, D.C. 40044. Charts show gold and silver coins of the world, with special attention given the intrinsic value when previous metals are quoted at three different prices. Information is provided so collectors can compute the intrinsic value of any coin quoted at any bullion price when the gross weight of the coin and its fineness is known. Other aids for collectors include a list of world mintmarks used since 1500 A.D.; 10 pages listing coin books printed around the world since 1966; how coin conditions are described by collectors in 10 languages; a list of equivalent values of currencies of other nations and coin museums in other countries. Collectors wishing to correspond with foreign-oriented societies in the United States will find a listing of these organizations as well as clubs in other countries world professional dealer organizations and publications in the U.S. and other countries with world coinage outlook t»*«t )»*• "MwK. «•*»»«>.*'*«« t* !»<« The 10th Edition of "How to Order Foreign Coins" may be ordered from the Amos Press. P.O.Box 150, Sidney, Ohio 45365 at $2.50 per copy. For further information direct your inquiries to Courtney Coffing, .Editor. PARAMOUNT AVERAGES March 20, 1975 Silver Coins 1873 '/-.Dime BU $140.00+ 1892 1 Dime BU 62.50+ 1875' .254 BU 500.00+ 1917" .25 BU 195.00+ 1875"* $1.BU 395.00+ 1899 S1.BU $48.00 1921"" $1.BU 106.1926""' .50<t BU 34.50- Up 2887 Points Total $1481.50+ •Carson City Mint Letters (CC) "Type I Nude "•San Francisco Mint Letter (S) ""Peace '""Oregon Trail Commemorative Washington Window Detente Among the Demos By ARNOLD B. SAWISLAK WASHINGTON (UPI) - It seems unlikely and it may only be temporary, but the Democrats appear to be approaching detente... with themselves. The first signs of this unusual situation cropped up at the party's Kansas City miniconvention last winter. All the elements were present for one of those patented bloodlettings that have kept the Democrats in a state of turmoil since 1968. But with National Chairman Robert S. Strauss frantically plastering over every crack he could see developing, the party came out of the charter-writing meeting with the outward image of unity. Because Strauss' manuevering had to be carried out in the open and because he was unable to quell all public complaining, his accomplishment was regarded as remarkable but tenuous. And, when the party's Compliance Review Commission, a body set up to enforce the 1976 national convention delegate selection rules, fell back into bitter squabbling in January, it looked as if the Democrats once again had reverted to feuding and fussing, The issue that divided the compliance commission was, like many such matters, a technical point of rules enforcement that both the reform and regular factions of the party chose to turn into major ideological tests. The showdown was set up for the regular meeting of the Democratic National Committee in March, and it really looked as if compromise was going to be impossible. On top of that, another issue arose before the national committee meeting that promised to excite as much contention as the CRC controversy. This one had the earmarks of a confrontation between men and women in the party, and no one seemed able to head it off. But both controversies were defused at the national committee, meeting, and this time Strauss did not have to make as public a show of trying to mollify everyone as he had at Kansas City. The first issue was finessed. With both sides on the CRC agreeing, the action it took on the rules in January was set aside and the question referred to another committee. This did not guarantee a successful compromise, but at least it got the question out of an arena in which both sides had taken rigid positions. The important advance was the willingness of the CRC adversaries to let an opportunity for a final showdown pass, A true political compromise was worked out on the second issue, which was raised when SCHOOL EXCHANGE O3NXT I SALE On Closing the International Gum Gap By DICK WEST WASHINGTON (UPI) Remember the reaction when the Soviet Union first exploded an atomic bomb? That accomplishment by what Americans regarded as a technically backward nation created shock waves of surprise, dismay and alarm in this country. Sines then, of course, we have become conditioned to Soviet breakthroughs. Too much so, perhaps. The degree of calmness with which we accepted their latest scientific feat was phlegmatic almost to the point of torpor. HardJy anyone was galvanized by the news that the USSR now has the know-how to produce its own chewing gum. Yet on a boding-no-good scale of 1 to 10 that development hits at least 6.8. Since I personally have retained a trace of old-fashioned anxiety, I contacted certain sources in the intelligence community and asked them to evaluate the Soviet gum program. "Its chief significance lies in the fact that it will give Kremlin officials the extra dimension of being able to walk and chew gum at the same time," one evaluator told me. "As you probably know from things you have heard about President Ford, chewing gum while walking is considered a high priority asset in a world leader. "It's right up there with wearing a helmet while playing football." I said, "Does this mean the Soviets are on the verge of dosing the gum gap ?" "At present we don't view the Soviet gum-making capability as a threat to American superiority in that field," the evaluator replied. "Our agents obtained a wad of it from the bottom of a Moscow theater seat. Tests show it is still in the primative stage with a licorice flavor that quickly dissipates. "Moreover, their productive potential currently is limited to about three packs per capita per year. Many veteran U.S. gum lovers chew that much in an hour. "The Soviets, however, have a history of making the most of their limitations. We anticipate that in a few years they'll te turning out peppermint, spearmint and assorted other flavors that give America chewing gum supremacy. "From that point, it's only a question of time until they advance to baseball card bubble gum." I said, "When do you expect their gum capacity to reach a par with ours?" "Not until they develop a modem, sophisticated delivery system. Once they have a perfected a coin-operated machine that dispenses colored gum balls, watch out!" some women members of the national committee sought to bar selection of any city for the 1976 Democratic convention where the Equal Rights Amendment had not been ratified. The arguments on both sides of this one were well-reasoned and passionately declared, but it appeared the committee's feminists were going to take a shellacking if it came to a vote. But without Strauss having to take an open role, the opposing sides worked out a resolution which took the positive side on the ERA question: directing the party to hold its convention in a city and state where the amendment had been approved if it was otherwise qualified. The opponents in this controversy were people of strong opinions who could not be accused of selling out their principles simply to achieve an image of party unity. They did not, in fact, achieve party unity. But they did relax enough to make negotiation possible. And that, in a political house where the occupants had been breaking their own windows, was something new. The best lifesaving gear in Great Salt Lake, Utah, is a 10- pound-weight tied to the feet so a person can keep his feet down and his head up. No one has ever drowned in the lake while swimming, The only fatalities have come from boat or airplane" accidents. SUNBEAM THE GRASS CUTTING MACHINE 19" LAWN CHAMP Also available In 21" WHY! Sunbeam offers, 1. Single 6-position lever adjusts all four wheels at one time for cutting height. 2. Automatic rear safety door covers discharge when catcher is not in use. 3. 5-position commercial grade handle. 4. Folding handle for easy storage. 5. Deep-channel deck provides powerful vacuum action mowing. 6. Rear discharge for easy maneuvering and closer cutting to trees and buildings. 21" SELF-PROPELLED LG21S For a limited time Value Lifetime Grass Catcher with the'purchase of a Sunbeam Gas Lawn Champ Lawn Mower, SUNBEAM Mowers also available in Electric Models! 19" LAWN CHAMP Single Blade Electric Mower Model LE19 21" t Rear discharge • Cast aluminum deck • Powerful electric motor with Dynamic Brake Feature t Easy empty bag with exclusive litter pouch 15-Posltlon folding handle LAWN CHAMP Single-Blade Electric Mower Model IE 21 • Rear discharge • Cast aluminum deck • Powerful Electric Motor with Dynamic Brake Feature • Trailing safety shield • Easy empty ballistic bag with exclusive litter pouch • 6-Posltlon height adjustment • Folding handle Sunbeam Lawn Champ Twin Blide Electric Mower Model IE 1ST SWING OVER HANDLE Cast aluminum deck for easy maneuverability. Side discharge. COME IN TODAY & COMPARE BUY YOUR Sunbeam MOWER FROM ONE OF THESE DEALERS. . , SAVE On our exchange pioyram these machines are kept in new condition and appearance w^th new machine warranty HERE ARE A FEW OF 23 EXAMPLES OF HOW YOU SAVE: $669 Viking 6000, $527 $714 Vikiuy 6000 w/tuble, $545, Save $169 $539 Viking 840, $230, Suve $230 $589 Viking 2840, $398, Suve $191 $469 Viking 3810, $210, Suve $250 $529 Viking 2810, $299, Suve $230 ALLRED PRO HARDWARE Pleasant Orove ALPINE VALLEY LUMBER & PRO MART Alplni ANDERSON LUMBER Provo BERT'S SMALL ENGINE SERVICE Orem CHASE LUMBER & PRO HARDWARE Payson DUFF SHELLEY LAWN MOWER SERVICE American Fork FOUR D PLUMBING & PRO HARDWARE Nephl KOLOB LUMBER & PRO HARDWARE Sprlngville MOTOR MERC Provo SPANISH FORK LUMBER Spanish Fork UTAH TIMBER & COAL Provo j ICMI i University Mall | HAROLD SQUARE HOME MART University Mall

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