Pampa Daily News from Pampa, Texas on June 22, 1972 · Page 6
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June 22, 1972

Pampa Daily News from Pampa, Texas · Page 6

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Pampa, Texas
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Thursday, June 22, 1972
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Page 6
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* PAMP A OARY NtWS PAMPA. TEXAS Mth YEAR Thursday. June 22, 1S72 BATTIN' AROUND KEVIN WALLS CRAIG WILBORN REBECCA WINTER Six PHS Graduates Selected As Recipients Of Cabot Scholarships Recipients of the seven 1972 Cabot Corporation Western Region Scholarships have been selected. Six of these awards went to the following Pampa High School graduates; James P. Daniel, Bruce Lee Losher, Laura R. Riehart, Kevin L. Walls, William Craig Wilborn, and RebeccaS. Winter. Jim Daniel, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joe M. Daniel, Jr., 1928 Evergreen, graduated with honors from Pampa High School and was a member of the National Honor Society. His activities included participation in the school play, three-year letterman in tennis, student council, Boy Scouts, and church work. As a member of the Key Club, he was selected as one of the top ten Lt. Governors of the Key Club in 1971. Jim plans to attend Colorado School of Mines, in Golden, Colo., with a major in Mining Engineering. Lee Losher is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Don Losher of 1821 Fir. Lee also graduated with honors from Pampa High School and was a member of the National Honor Society. His activities included the school paper, school annual, literary society, newspaper, photography, advertising artist, and tennis. He was a member of the Key Club. Recognitions Lee received for Boy Scout achievements were the Eagle Scout, Order of the Arrow, and the God and Country awards. Lee is interested in social work and would like to attend Colorado College in Colorado Springs, Colo. The parents of Laura Riehart are Mr. and Mrs. B.W. Riehart, 1615 Fir. She was a member of the National Honor Society and recipient of Concordia Presidential Scholarship. She was active in music and dramatics in high school. She received the best-supporting actress for her performance in the class play. She is also active in church activities and a member of the Truteens. At this time Laura would like to pursue a course in Liberal Arts from Concordia Lutheran College in Austin, Tex. Kevin Walls is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Vernon L. Walls of 2113 Hamilton. Kevin received recognition in three honor courses upon graduation from Pampa High School. His school activities included the school play, dramatic club, debating, basketball, football, tennis, and track. He received varsity letters in tennis and track, and placed third in Oratorical Contest. He is a member of the Thespians and participated in Boy Scouts, attaining the rank of Eagle Scout. Kevin plans to attend the University of Texas, where he will major in Pre-Law. Craig Wilborn is the son of Mr. and Mrs. W.T. Wilborn of 2212 Chestnut. Craig is a National Merit Scholarship winner, and his school activities included the school paper, school play, dramatic club, debating, and choir. Special recognitions which Craig received are first place, news story, and second place, specialized column from the Texas High School Press Association, and from U.I.L. Literary Contest he received first place for editorial (District). Craig hopes to become a lawyer also, and plans to attend the University of Texas. Rebecca Winter is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Irwin T. Winter, 1816 N. Zimmers. She received eleven honor certificates for work in advanced high school courses and was a member of the National Honor Society. Her school participation included debating, art club, drill team, and she had a second place exhibit at the Science Fair. She is active in the First Baptist Church Training Union and the church choir. She was chairman of the First Baptist Church delegation to Explo 72. Rebecca hopes to attend North Texas State University with a major in Secondary Education. She would like to teach Biology or Chemistry. A White Deer High School graduate. Leon F. Osborne, Jr., was the other Western Region scholarship recipient. These scholarships pay $800 per year for four years. Recipients are selected by a committee composed of representatives from The University of Texas, Texas Technological University, The University of Oklahoma and Louisiana State University. This year's Scholarship Committee meeting was held at The University of Texas, Austin, Tex. Worry Clinic By GEORGE W. CRANE, PH. D.. M. D. Lorna Is a superb teacber.For jibe wants to enthuse her students about the courses she offers them. Since most students grumble about writing English themes, notice how you can add zest to this type of course! CASE U-S16: Lorna B.,aged 26, is a new English teacher. "Dr. Crane," she began,"! teach composition to Senior High Schoolers. "And I want to encourage them to write more effective letters, as well as stories. "But I have read your 'Worry Clinic' ever since I was in the 8th grade, so I know your stress on motivating people by use of psychology. "Since many of my pupils come from homes where they lacked an encyclopedia, a dictionary and any sress on correct grammar, I find that they shun English composition. "How can I add more zest and enthusiasm to my courses?" CONTESTS MOTIVATE Competition adds zest, so urge your students to write letters to the editor of their newspaper. Pick out various vital topics and then let the pupils compose short, snappy letters, preferably not over 200 words in length. This will help direct their attention to reading the daily newspaper. For they will be eager to see whose letters might be deemed worthy of being printed. Use the psychological rules in the booklet mentioned below, for they will improve your writing within 30 minutes! Also, employ current commercial contests as subjects for class themes. While teaching my "Psychology of Advertising" courses at Northwestern University, I often assigned current commercial contests. They usually required a 25-word or SOword letter in which you were to tell why you liked a certain soap or toothpaste, cereal, shampoo, etc. After my students submitted their letters as class assignments, we'd discuss them in class and offer various criticisms. Then some of the students would type them afresh and send them to the firm that sponsored the contest. A number of my students thus won small cash prizes, ranging from $1 up to $50. Others were awarded merchandise, such as a case of oranges or tuna fish, an electric iron, toasters, etc. Some enterprising English teachers have linked up with local dental societies, American Legion, or men's service clubs, such as Lions, Kiwanis, Rotary, etc. For such clubs will often donate prizes of $25, $15 and maybe 5 prizes of $5 each, for the best essays on why this is a Republic vs. a Democracy. Or why Capitalism far surpasses Communism. Or a 300-word essay explaining any one of the "10 Common Fallacies in Logic," as outlined in that booklet offered earlier this week. Indeed, a few teachers have even offered a small prize out of their own pocket for the prize winning "Letter to a Sweetheart" or to "Grieving Parents who have lost a Child," etc. That "League of the Golden Pen," also makes an ideal weekly project, for it requires only that you write a few paragraphs (one page at most) to anybody not on your regular mailing list but who merits a note of sympathy, praise or condolence. Let the students report later on the results, for sometimes very surprising stories develop that even pluck your heart strings! So send for my booklet "How to Write Salable Copy," enclosing a long, stamped, return envelope, plus 25 cents Lorna used it and changed the outlook of her entire class! (Always write to Dr. Crane, Hopkins Bldg., Mellott, Indiana 47158, enclosing r. long, stamped, addressed envelope and 25 cents to cover ., jing and printing costs when you send for one of hit booklets). ANNUAL ANTLERS ALBANY, N. Y. (AP) - All winter long, bucks in the deer herd have looked just like all the rest of the deer. Paul M. Kelsey, New York regional conservation educator, says that the mechanics of deer antler growth have fascinated people for centuries. Antlers of the deer famUy are replaced annually, distinctly different from the horns of antelope, buffalo or domestic cattle, which simply adds additional external growth each season. Scientists think that increased sunlight is picked up by the deer's eye and passed to the pituitary gland located at the base of the brain. This gland then stimulates the start of antler growth. By mid-May, growth has started. After the breeding season, the buck's antlers are shed for the winter. Infancy To Old Age TV Log By C.R. BATTEN It was almost 20 years ago that this observer was first introduced to some of the stifling work rules under which the railroads operate. It was my first tree planting season "working on the railroad." We had purchased something over 200,000 tree seedlings, and it was my job to see that they were planted during a three-week period. The trees had been loaded in a refrigerator car, which was parked on a siding near the planting operation. The car was spotted in an inconvenient place, so I innocently asked our tractor operator to push the car down the track a few feet. He refused, On questioning, I learned that if he had moved the car, an entire switch crew could have turned in time slips and collected one day's pay. Spotting the car was it's job, under union contract rules. The railroad ran a fast passenger train between Chicago, Illinois, and Minneapolis, Minnesota. During that six-hour trip, three train crews were used-each of them receiving one day's pay. A major switch yard was closed in order to speed freight train schedules and improve operating efficiency. Yet a switch crew continued to report at the yard every day, and received a full day's pay-tor doing nothing; These are just a few of the instances of "featherbedding"' with which I am personally familiar. Clarence B. Carson describes how these and other restrictions came about in his THROTTLING THE RAILROADS. (Available from The Foundation for Economic Education, Inc., irvington-on-Hudson, New York 10539; 143 pages, $400 cloth cover, $2.00 paperback.) Dr. Carson is an educator, author and lecturer, specializing in American social and intellectual history. In his book, Carson traced the history of the railroad industry from its subsidized infancy to its subsidized old age. "Government throttled the railroads in three ways mainly," wrote Carson. "In the first place, restrictive regulation took away crucial managerial authority from the railroads and vested it in the Interstate Commerce Commission. This was supplemented, in turn, by various legislative inhibitions of general application. In the second place, government subsidized and otherwise privileged competitive means of transport. In the third place, government fostered the organization of railway unions and aided them in various ways in circumscribing and hamMrintmg the use of rail facilities " "A state of organised irresponsibility wafc established .,." according to Carson, "the power to make managerial decisions of wide and determinmg scope was vested in the Interstate Commerce Commission. The responsibility for operation the railroads remained with private management. But that management was denied the authority to make on its own all sorts of decisions by which entrepreneurs ordinarily operate businesses efficiently and successfully." His book is a clear and .easy-to-read indictment of government intervention in the railroad transportation industry. In unmistakeable language, he declares " THE PRESENT TRANSPORTATION MESS IS A RESULT OF GO VERNMENT INTERVENTION" (emphasis his). THROTTLING THE RAILROADS is recommended reading for every member of Congress, every railroad executive, and every railroad shipper or would-be passenger who has said that Congress should "do something"about the railroads. For Carson makes it eminently clear what Congress should do. TVAmd Radio .. . . iAdam-12 - f'Stand Up and Cheer 10-Mayberry, R.F.D, * 1i* 4 NBC Adventure Theater 7-Alias Smith and Jones 10-My World and Welcome to i • 7:30 10-My Three Sons CYNTHIA It 4-lronslde 7-Longstreet 10-Movie, "Assignment K" •:tt 4-Dean Martin 7-Owen Marshall, Counselor at Law 10:00 4,10-News, Weather. Sports 7-News, Weather, Hotline. Sports 10:30 4-Johnny Carson 10-Movie. "Signpost to Murder" 10:40 7-Rona Barrett 10:45 7-Perry Mason 11:45 7-Dick Cavett Ballroom Nostalgia In step with the nostalgia tune, ballroom dancing is making a comeback. And dance lessons are a great way to work off extra pounds. And they can also accent grace and poise you never thought you had. NEW YORK (AP),- Any television Mftel tttii ton| title such it "Jht J«ty Reed When You're Hot Ywi're Hot Show" immediately gives the veteran viewer mii|lv«ngi. Jerry Reed, who'i he? CBS mint hive been nervow to tag the show with his hit record. The network, replacing the canceled "Glen Campbell Show" with a summer variety hour, seems to have found a reasonably exact facsimile of Glen Campbell. Reed Jaundi Nashville, looks Jack .Armstrong-American and talks humbly. At the same time he seems to be a an attractive country singer who has been bushWacked by a roving band of Hollywood variety show writers. He seems to have been too polite or ambitious to say he'd rather go along with his own thing. It was not a bad show Tuesday night, the premiere of the series, but it did seem to be phony, very Hollywood and carefully designed to hold a little something for everybody. As often happens to formula- based plans, it may have irked more often than it enchanted. Codeine, a bitter-tasting substance used as a pain reliever, is an alkaloid found in opium. f/nfAotu/ •L* C R ANTHONY CO MINS PERMANENT PRESS DRESS OR SPORT HIRTS GROUP II Val To 3.99 MEN'S PERMANENT PRESS SPORT SHIRTS over 500 yds of white double knit included 58/60" 100% Polyester DOUBLE KNIT Reg 3.99 Beautiful 2 and 3 color novelty jacquard double knits in the newest spring-' shades. Easy-care 100% polyester is perfect for creating a versatile, high fashion wardrobe. Excellent for dress and casual styles. A 5.99 yd. value. Reg. 4.99 yd. OUBLE KNIT Double Knit in solids men* patterns, crapes Jacquards. New spring and our Reg 3.99 yd. summer colors Yd Sizes S.M.L.XL Assorted ColorsSolids, Prints, and Stripes GROUP I MENS AND BOYS TANK TOPS 1.66 Ea GROUP II MENS TANK TOPS 2.66 Ea VALUES TO 3.99 MENS SWIM SUITS $O57 Sizes S-M-LXL Solid-Fancies 2 Ladies 100% Polyester Double Knit SHORTS Cool Summer Style Jutt Right For Vacation Ladies » DRESSES PANT SUITS NOW REDUCED Regular M6-M9 LADIES t GIRLS 100% NYLON KNIT SHORT SETS Reg 3.99 Elastic waist Band Stitched Down Center Crease Sizes 8-18 7 Ladies Siies 8-18 SIZES 7-14 Pr 3 66 PRICES GOOD IN BOTH STORES C R ANTHONY C O J 118N. Cuyler DOWNTOWN Pampa CORONADO I SHOPPING I CENTER I

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