Arizona Republic from Phoenix, Arizona on November 5, 1969 · Page 30
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November 5, 1969

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Arizona Republic from Phoenix, Arizona · Page 30

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Phoenix, Arizona
Issue Date:
Wednesday, November 5, 1969
Page:
Page 30
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Page 30 article text (OCR)

BULLDOG The Arizona Republic Phoenix, Wed,, Nov. 5, 1969 uit filed to effect cale's self-defense United Pre&s International CHICAGO - Thirty law- vefs, charging that U.S. District Court Judge Julius J. Hoffman had returned Black Paftther leader Bobby Seale "16 his pre-emancipation chains," yesterday petitioned to halt Scale's riot conspiracy trial until Seale is allowed to handle his own defense. fhe suit, filed in U.S. District Court, asked for an immediate show cause hearing on why the trial should not be halted until Seale is permitted to act as his own defense counsel. Seale is on trial with seven other men, charged with conspiring to incite • riots during the 1968 Democratic National Convention. The petition also asked that Hoffman be required to allow Seale to defend himself. The injunction petition was assigned for hearing to U.S. District Judge Edwin A. Robson. The primary purpose of the suit, attorney Howard Moore Jr. of Atlanta said at a news conference, is to "gain for Bobby Seale the right to defend himself." Seale was shackled and gagged in the courtroom for three days last week when he erupted into wild outbursts in demanding the right to cross-examine prosecution witnesses. Seale Monday and yesterday tempered both the frequency and tenor of his attempts to defend himself, but issued a new, handwritten statement calling Hoffman "a racist, a Fascist and a pig s etc." Moore, a brother - in - law of Georgia legislator Julian Bond, said 30 attorneys, most of them black, collaborated on? the suit on behalf of Seale and the Black Panther Party. Seale is national chairman of the Panthers. The suit, Moore said, is based on the Magna Carta, the-Bill of Rights and the Civil "War era amendments to the Constitution. Big storm in Pacific hits coast Associated Press The season's first major storm in the Pacific hit the West Coast yesterday with heavy rain and gales that stirred up waves 24 feet high. Gale warnings flew from Point Arena, Calif., to northern Oregon. Storm warnings were posted along the Washington coast and in the Strait of 'Juan de Fuca. Winds gusting at more than 70 miles an hour hit Cape Blanco on the southwestern Oregon coast. The Pacific Northwest had moderate to heavy rainfall with more than IVz inches at New Port on the coast of central. Oregon. Several Washington points had light showers. Most of the West and the plains region had clear, dry weather. A general frost and freeze wag forecast for last night for the Southeast with the exception of Florida and the immediate Gulf Coast region. He castigated both Hoffman and the trial. He said the trial was an outgrowth of "a racist system of justice" and showed that "little progress has been made since slavery." Scale's new statement denied he had disrupted the trial and said he "only demanded my rights" when he insisted, after "firing" his courtroom lawyers, that only San Francisco attorney Charles P. Garry, recovering from surgery, could represent lu'm in court. Hoffman repeatedly refused to let Seale cross-examine witnesses. Finally, after the defendant's eruptions brought the trial to a near standstill, the judge had marshals gag and truss him. Without explanation, the gag and shackles were removed Monday. Prosecution testimony yesterday centered on butyric acid allegedly found in a bus terminal locker and in the purses of two women arrested in a Loop hotel the day after the convention. Undercover police agent William Frapolly had testified previously that defendant John Froines advocated that antiwar demonstrators spread the acid in hotels because "it smells like vomit" and told the policeman he gave the acid to Kathy Boudine and Constance Brown to strew around. Joanne Ryan, a policewoman, testified she found butyric acid in the purses of the two women at the Palmer House Hotel early on Aug. 30, 1968. She said she also found in Miss Brown's purse a key to a locker. Policeman Ted McMillin testified the key opened locker No. 107 in the Greyhound terminal. He said the locker contained a one-half gallon bottle and several smaller bottles, all containing a clear white liquid that "smelled like vomit." Lease a new IMMEDIATE DELIVERY OH SOME MODELS 320 N. CENTRAL AVE. PHOENIX, ARIZONA 858-4851 48 YEARS IN PHOENIX INDUSTRIAL Salesman Only (want to close more- sales? Cwant to handle objections more effectively?' (want to make more sales and money? •The Dale Carnegie Sales Course has proved its value to' ^salesmen of all products for more than 25 years. This Sales' [Course can sharpen your selling skills. Its practical down-) jto«earth motivational methods will help make more sales) rfrom the start. There's no other sales training method-. Hike it. This Action-Packed Course will help you to: Make More Sales Make More Money Become Enthusiastic Reach Your Coal in Selling Handle Obiectlpns Effectively Develop Sell-Confidence Organize Yourself and Your Sales Talk Approach Your Prospect Get Prospects Interested Sell to Groups "Sell Yourself" ndustrial Sales Class now forming. This 'class is limited to hose salesmen only who are involved in selling and serv- iping industry. Talk with your boss about the Dale Carnegie Sales^ Bourse. Perhaps this is the step he has been waiting for) yog to take. Presented by George W. Murphy ft Associates 955-3023 or 2663188 literature/ Pleat* Illume Phone Zip # DALE CARNEOIE SALES COURSE Mother to be asked sorts whereabouts United Press International LOS ANGELES - Authorities took legal steps yesterday to try to force Mrs. Betty Fouquet, already charged with abandoning her 5 - year - old daughter, to reveal the whereabouts of her missing son, Jeffrey, 8. Mrs. Fouquet has been held in jail in Bakersfield, Calif., since she was identified as the mother of little Jody "Smith" who was found clinging to the fence of a busy freeway where she had been let out of a car on Oct. 25. Sheriff's deputies discovered that Jeffrey, another of her four children by a previous marriage to Billy Joe Lansdown of Camas Valley, Ore., has been missing for months. Mrs. Fouquet has refused, on advice of an .attorney, to talk about what has happened to Jeffrey pending a court hearing on the abandonment of Jody. The Los Angeles sheriff's homicide department prepared to go before Juvenile Court yesterday to have Jeffrey declared a "ward of the court." "What we hope to do is have Mrs. Fouquet brought here and ask her the simple question: Where's Jeffrey?" said Lt. Norman Hamilton. Hamilton conceded Mrs. Fouquet might still refuse to answer. In Bakersfield, attorney James Bowles said he had advised her not to make any statements. Asked why she could not make a simple declaration about the whereabouts of Jeffrey and clear up the mystery of his disappearance Bowles said: "I don't think she knows where he is." Bowles said Mrs. Fouquet may be required to appear in Los Angeles Superior Court but added, "I will go with her and she will not answer the questions." He said he was opposed to allowing anybody to question her and would advise her of her rights against self-incrim- ination. When asked if he would allow her to talk if her answer could not incriminate her, Bowles said he could not answer the question with the information he has. Police dug .up the backyard of a home in Bell Gardens where the mother had lived with her common - law husband, Ronald, and found some bones buried there, but the coroner's office indicated they were not human bones. iti>i£jXXi£g!^gi^jjjjjf^£Kjj.£f^£i EVERYTHING IN GLASS 'V W *W4 W, X W**7B GUNDAU-AVE. ^ CAMCLBAOC Kb. A^ IWMAM *CM6bt. 41 1 tt, AM. t JBWSg<g> summit. eitf.itti HTJMJWiU. ». '" M.tJBWSgT (ft XIUM1 w,iHI,vtnovrr,^_J^ UJlSHQP ©L ASS t ALSO YUMA 1250 THIRD AVE, Mis. MtlUM PHONE 782-9265 EVERYTHING IN GLASS Now it makes more sense than ever to serve your family ffi- the sensible drink. Why do we call Hi-C the sensibte<Jrink? Hi-C is sensible because it is naturally sweetened. In fact, we have always used natural sweeteners in Hi-C. Hi-C is sensible because it is made from fresh fruit. Hi-C has natural fruit flavor and that's why kids really love Hi-G. Hi-C is sensible because it has lots of Vitamin C, so kids can drink as much as they like because Hi-C is good for them. Hi-C is sensible because it comes ready to pour. No mixing. No mess. No fuss or bother, so you'll love Hi-C as much as your kids. Hi-C is the sensible drink because it is truly sensible. And the best part is, it W. also truly delicious. The sensible drink. .3 ft a «p t> w

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