The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin from Racine, Wisconsin on July 26, 1959 · Page 42
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July 26, 1959

The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin from Racine, Wisconsin · Page 42

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Racine, Wisconsin
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Sunday, July 26, 1959
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lULOtNt gVNDAT BULLCTIN July 2«, 1»M See. S, Piiffe |2 Tather of H-Bomb' Tells What U. S. Must Do to Catch Up with Soviets EDITOR'S NOTE — The scientist known as tlic father of the hydrogen bomb is convinced Russia will lead in aaencc in a decade. Hcne's his suggestion for what must be done to help America catch up, in an article written exclusively for the Associated Press. By Dr. Edward Teller Copyright, 1959, The Associated Press LIVERMORE, Cilif.~(AP)—At the end of World War II there was no question of where the Icadcrsliip in science was to be found. It was in this country. We had the best scicnti.st.s, the biggest and best-trained group of engineers, the most forward looking group of men in the apphcations of science to increase our power oyer nature and to use this power to the happiness and advancement of all. If you would then have enumerated the other countries of the world, Ru.ssia would have come way down on the list. By quite a few of us.' Russia might have been for -j '"'K*^' 'f |on a competition in wieldinR a S°"<^"- Uvhip, there is no doubl that the Best Development Russians will win. Further- Today there is a question l'""''^' the Rrcatcst accomplish- 1 1—J u:_ i}..,iments in this world are not ac- where leadership, lies. But, ,. . . , ,.. there is no question which!^«'"P''^^^«'^ '^'r""^T^ ^""^ country is developing .scientistsaccomplished for other rca- ^ p h ison.s—for reasons of inner This country Intellectual achievement is not, and perhaps never can be, for everybody. This is not appreciated in our democratic society. Now it has been said recently about the American public, about American opinion, that 11 is anti-intellectual. I believe that this is not so. American opinion is not anti- intellectual. It is non-intellectual. An intellectual is not resented; he is recoRnized as a person outside the common society. If he pets something accomplished, he is even greatly honored. He may be put on a pedestal, which is not the right place for him to be, in my opinion. Hut he is never, i never understood. "I.envc Us Alone" When he begins to talk about his specialty to any but his closest colleagues he can. if he wishes to watch, notice the ear flaps coming down. Society says to the intellectual, specifically to the scientist: most effectively, is Russia. I think there cannot be a shadow of a doubt that 10 years from now Russia will bo: the unquestioned leader in the scientific field. which we live. This is something which 1 cial animal. And the most ,so- , ... I "Go ahead and play, but leave inccossity and that is how it|^,j, „ionc" ^^""''^ I « I 1 Now this attitude by the Man Is social p^,,^,!^ produced a response But this inner necessity is fr„r„ the .scientists, and a not independent of the circlcj response from the intellectuals. Man is a so- believe we cannot change, no icial of the social animals is the matter what we do today. To cl"lcl. He feels his way in a so- educatc a scientist is a long-cety new to him and he adapts drawn-out process. It takes f'^^J' «"!|'nd him. many years. The best mindslA"^ what does he see? are the youngest minds. The! a 'l';mocracy chief contribution to scientific!'"" "''""^^ "^'"P''^?, work Is made by people be- ^''f- ''y, twcen. say. 25 and 30 The'" '^/^ ""'^ true democracy the people on whom this dulv will '''''' •^""^^ A"(J by fall in 10 years are Icarn .nglV^"' ' "T ''"'^ .T'.''""' today. Better Educated democracy, not only that we have the means by which to 'determine our political fate. They are in greater number n,e„„ n^(,re. Much more, and they are better educated 1 j fy^^an economic democracy, in the Soviet Union than theyj ^ean that all our production are anywhere else. And even js for the masses. All value if we bend all our efforts to judgments are for the mas.ses. change the present situation, what is good for just a few is EU we can hope for is to re- not appreciated. What is good gain lost leadership later. That for everyone is paramount. wo are going to lose our lead ership is Inevitable. More Difficult This makos it more difficult Russia, by the organization f„r the privileged ones among of its country — an organi/.a-iim. because even if you have tion which does not simply find money, and even if you haven't its roots in communism but which goes back through the paid it all in taxes, you do not really have anything to spend centuries — Is a country wherejit on. Because if you try to the individual is told what to'buy something that is better, do and he does it. After the you usually wind up with some- revolution the Russians were thing that is merely different, told, "We have to do some-; This is, in my opinion again, thing about science." as it should be. It takes off In Russia, a scientist Is a the edge of the competition that privileged individual. He has;otherwise would be nasty. It all the honor, the comforts, and he also has security. This in Russia means more than it takes away another motivation, and throws the individual back into the freedom of his own means in our country. We be- 1 soul, where he can do with his lieve, and I think rightly, that [otherwise comfortable life all of us should be respected if not honored; that all of us should have a comfortable life, and most of all, the life and liberty of us all should be secure. This is at it should be. Two Alternatives But in the Soviet Union a child knows that he can be comfortable only if he is a poll what he chooses. This is good, if applied to good people who know how to use their freedom. But now let us consider the consequences of applying this thoroughly democratic order of things to the pursuit of Intel lectual achievements. Intellectual achievements arc not at- tician—a successful politician.itmct've in themselves. Thoi that is — or a scientist. Andi*? " J « V c n t of intellectual achievements is most definitely an acquired taste. he can be secure only if he is a scientist. In order to embark on their scientific career, they work hard. They have to work hard. There is the whip of necessity which falls on every person in the Russian society. Learn to Like It You don't start out by liking classical music. You learn to like it. You don't start out by seeing the difference between good and bad architecture. You And this response is no less disastrous than the cause that has produced it. The respon.se is this: "I am an intellectual. 1 love my subject. It is the whole world to me. Practically nothing else exists for me. And you people don't give a hang what I am doing. Well, I don't give a hang what you are doing. I will be by myself, go off into a corner with some of my close as.sociates, and we'll talk to each other In polysyllables which only we understand, and .sometimes I wonder whether anybody else understands me but myself." Must Overcome Chasm There is a chasm separating the scientist from the common crowd. This chasm has been established on both sides, and both sides must make an effort to overcome it. Our society will not he healthy until, and unless, this chasm is bridged This chasm exists In science. It exists in education. You may recognize that science Is important for our future, and you may tell your son. "Study mathematics, study physics. Those are the fields In which the future lies." And your son will evabiate your advice consciously—and even more frequently, but more effectively. non-consciously—in the light of what he sees you are doing. If you yourself know nothing about mathematics and know nothing about physics, why should he be different? When all the other children around him consider these subjects slightly ridiculous, why should he be different from them? Laws of World 1 think we should recognize, nil of us, that in this techno- j logical age a person cannot be called educated if he does not understand at least in general terms the laws of this world that God has created. And if he does not understand the changes that we men have made in this world around us. by the remarkable achievt- mcnls of technology, he is not going to guide our future in the right way. As long as we consider the scientist as a magician, most often as a student of black magic, we shall be ignorant strangers in our technological world. There can be no greater mistake than to underestimate the Rusisans and the Communist empire. To my mind, together with this appreciation wtiich may be the basis of a future understanding, there must go another realization. Russia, the Communist world, is a machine. It is a magnificent machine. It is an admirable machine. But it is a machine. And the men of Russia are no more than parts chine. Curse or Blessing We in the free world have the enjoyment and responsibility of being free, of not being told what we should do and should not do. This can be a curse and it can be a blessing. If we take a shallow view of our responsibility, It is a curse. And this curse has been demonstrated in many of the mistakes of which we have all been, and are, guilty. It can be a blessing, because the highest achievements come througii the inner conviction, through the inventiveness, through the ideas, through the dedication that I cannot Imagine to be associated with anything but freedom. We, the people of the free world, are faced with a great challenge. In the concrcteness and the suddenness of the dangers that face us, In the number of people involved, it is a greater challenge than ever has faced humanity. 1 won't say that it is the greatest challenge in every respect, because each age feels its own challenge as the most unique and the most terrible thing that could be. It is our challenge; it is our world. Basic Fact I feel that the basic fact of this challenge is this: The world has become very small. We do influence our neighbors. Our neighbors do influence us. Today we have learned how to harness the atom. Tomorrow we are likely to find out how to influence the weather. Man has cultivated the land for mil- Icnia. We may sooii find out how to cultivate the oceans. All this is impossible for an of this ma-Jindividual, for a company, even for a nation. It cannot be accomplished except by co-operation between nations. The question before us is this: Shall that co-operation be enforced by an iron rule or .shall it be a co-operation between free partners? Revolution of Underdog We know our answer. We know the difficulties of the adjustments that go with our answer, and we would like to take time to work out our .solution. But time is what we don't have, because the Russians on the other side are not taking time. There is going on today in DR. EDWARD TELLER ... An Inevitable Loss ... the world a revolution of the underdog of yesterday. It is the revolution which has been called the revolution of rising expectations. It proceeds along with the turbulent expansion of the industrial revolution over the whole world. Who will lead that revolution, we or they? The advantages of direct action, of strict organization, is with them. We have nothing but the ability of the individual. It rests on the individual, on each of us, whether this revolution will bring about a world which will be slave, or a world that will be free. And the education of the scientist is an integral and important part of that fateful decision. VACATION SPECIAL MON., TUE. ond WED. ONLY SUITS DRESSES (Plain) A Regular ^.65 Value! SAVE 46c MON, TUE., WED. ONLY ^^^enfosf in DRY CLEANING ME 4-9470 301 MAIN The Best Car Buys Are In Your Hands Now ... In The Journal-Times Classified Section . . . Read The Want Ads Nowl EXTRA SPEOAl BARGAIN ROUNDUP FEATUREUI RFUL ALL-TRANSISTOR ... long distance Tmerson The I haven't visited the Sovieti learn to sec. And you Union myself. But 1 have t'"^^'" ^"^^"^^ « scien- myself. talked with many of my good scientific friends who have visited there. What they report is tific treatise and unless you have worked on it a lot, it might as well be in Volapuk. gener^lYy a'fri^ndly'^ecepUon.'iVolapuk: an extinct artificial The vituperations of the So-i'""^""^'^)- vlet officials do not represent t)ie feelings of the man on the gtreet in Moscow. But when iiny of my friends happened to mention that he was a scientist, this was another thing again. He became a wonderful person, no matter where he came from. A scientist! That is really fine. Not Easily Changed Now let us consider the position of the scientist in our country. Let me start by saying that I am going to criticize —but I am going to criticize in • 'matter which is not easily cluinged, and I can offer no «lg remedies. tii« poor situation in science ftj^ms from a generally good •Uvation of aociety as a whole; I will try to explain how in my mllld these two things are connected. And I certainly don't Wi9it to change the general good ,bacl (ground to save a de tail even if thst detail he ever 80M |iiiportant. We shall have to thlnlc Qur way ground this prob- leiiii. But first, let me try my hand at t)M diagnosis. I told you thatJ^ Ruifien children are drlvPiniy^the whip, Ours LAU'S Open Mon. £^ Noon to ^ NEVABREAK CASE lt*s Guaranteed Take Advantage of This 4-DAY SPECIAL BONUS OFFER P.M. AS ANNOUNCED 0/> THf ED SUUIVAN TV SHOW New Brownie Cameras FOR SNAPSHOTS ... FOR MOVIES wrnn lucnucaiYM MAKE LENS SETTINGS AUTOMATICALLY! BROWNIE STARMATIC CAMERA ^ _ ^ ,^ BROWNIE AUTOMATIC MOVIE CAMERA * We Goorontee fveryt/iing We Se//.' GO PRE! 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