The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin from Racine, Wisconsin on July 4, 1965 · Page 22
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July 4, 1965

The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin from Racine, Wisconsin · Page 22

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Racine, Wisconsin
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Sunday, July 4, 1965
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Page 22
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RACINE SUNDAY BULLETIN Sundoy, July 4, 1965 Journeys to Pleasure Take a Planned Wardrobe fo Europe By Frances Koltun • It 's a rare woman, 'ndeed, Who doesn 't have some anxiety on the subject of what clothes to take abroad. Faced with foreignness in food, language, even manners, it is natural for a woman to feel that the clothes that are her ; standbys at home will seem ' cut of place in another coun- • try. With this in mind, I'd like ' to proffer a few words of advice on the subject, as the '• great summer exodus gets ; under way. Suggestions— i . A well-rounded travel wardrobe for a short trip to Europe . jshould contain the following: A lightweight topcoat—this ' might be a knitted or jersey raincoat, simply cut, and in a color that goes with most of ; your other clothes: white, ; black, red or a pastel like ' pale blue that functions as a ' neutral. Two suits —one a sturdy flannel or tweed, the other perhaps a lightweight silk or linen. Three blouses and sweaters — consider silk overblouses that fold as flat as a handkerchief, one silk suit sweater and a cardigan to wrap around you come nightfall or a strongly airconditioned restaurant. Basic Black One simple black silk crepe dress for restaurants. One pale silk dress. Three daytime dresses: linens and wools if you are heading for northern Europe; linens and cottons for southern Europe. One bare dress with its own jacket. This could be in brocade, cotton or silk, for theater and dinner parties where one needs something more gala than a "little black." Shoes One or two hats, depending on how hat-minded you are normally. These can be turbans and berets that fold flat. Five pairs of shoes (luggage weight is never better spent than on these) including one pair of walking shoes (you wear this pair, boarding the plane or ship), one pair of black pumps, one pair of white or pale beige pumps to wear with everything. One pair of bedroom slippers, and one other pair of shoes that bring you solace and comfort when everything else about you is dead tired. (My restorative is a pair of gillies that are 16 years old.) , Three pairs of gloves. One f ven in Ancient Home Blondes Had More Fun London's trademark—a big, red double-decker omnibus. or two scarves to cover your head against the breezes or in churches. Enough lingerie to see you through at least three days without your having to do laundry. Considerations Now temper the suggestions above with these considerations: Even if the thermometer is a soaring 95 degrees when you pack, be sure to put woolens into your suitcase if you are heading for Scandinavia, Britain and other northern places. Europe's climate is less extreme than ours and summers in those places carry a fair amount of rain and cool weather. On the other hand, if your itinerary will include Spain, Greece or southern Italy, take a few cotton dresses that can be washed in soap and water. After a day of sightseeing in these dry parched climates, you will feel like having your clothes boiled clean. The dry cleaning that linen demands won't seem sudsy enough to restore any sort of pristine freshness. Cities where black after eight in the evening used to be mandator^' are now breaking out in a rash of pastels, so while you may pack one "little black" as insurance, don't leave your favorite "litle pink" at home. Silk Fall back on silk where possible, for it is pleasant against the skin and has so much natural resilience that it needs little pressing. Take clothes that move Sheer Elegance by Hannah Troy 3% yards 39-inch By its quiet, persuasive, beautiful shape and the sheer loveliness of the soft cowl and graceful sleeves, you know it must be by Hannah Troy. We can't think of a more elegant way to make an entrance anywhere this spring! A horizontal seam in front only accents the lean-waisted look—the back is smooth and straight. For a spring wedding or gala dinner party, make your version similar to the Original— the dress in chiffon over silk, sleeves and cowl of the chiffon alone. Or choose crepe, cotton chiffon, sheer wool. Printed Pattern A642 is available in Misses' Sizes 10, quires fabric. Send $1 for Printed Pattern A642 to Racine Journal- Times, Pattern Department, P.O. Box 59, Old Chelsea Station. New York II, N, Y. (Add 15 cents for each pattern for first class mailing and special handling.) Please print plainly your name, address with zone, style number and size. Send for the premiere edition of our couture pattern collection—57 of the world's most beautiful designer originals plus 50 cents free coupon to apply to any $1 pattern. Send 50 cents right now 12, 14, 16, 18. Size 16 re-jfor Couture Collection 10. well—no tight belts (in fact as few belts as possible they are too easy to lose), no dresses that aren't loose around the body. This is an easy order these days for so many clothes are cut this way. Don't bother with extra skirts, blouses or mix-and- match outfits—slipping into a one-piece dress is invariably easier, and I'd rather take an extra dress than oddments. Tuck in two or three small handbags in bright colors, the least costly way—measured in luggage weight—of giving your wardrobe a lift. No Clutter Leave anything that flutters, bangles, floats or shimmers at home. When everything else around you is different and changing, it's comforting to have simple, undemanding, clothes on your back, so that you can present a cool, unruffled face to the monuments. Garden Work Is Lighter in Summer 6<f PRINTED PATTERN A642 SIZES 10-18 With the coming of June garden work tapers off and well it may, for gardeners need an opportunity to enjoy their gardens, too. However, there are a few things thai must be done. One is loosening the soil. Whether one grows flowers, vegetables or merely has shrub borders for landscape effect, the surface of the soil should be kept loose. A hard- baked soil does not permit the entrance of water or the interchange of air and various gases that must take place in the soil. Large - scale areas may be kept loose with power tools but the average home gardener still relies heavily upon the pronged cultivator or some form of hoe. For this it can be a conventional all-purpose hoe, a narrow one for little spaces, a pointed out for the same purpose or a scuffle hoe which is pulled and pushed back and forth. The important part is to keep the top inch of soil loosened up and the weeds cut off just beneath the surface. Of course, once the soil is loosened properly subsequent work can be reduced by the use of mulches. One to three inches of old hay, straw, buckwheat, rice or pecan hulls, lawn clippings, ground sugar cane or corn cobs, shredded bark, or sawdust and chips can be used. These will then retain moisture and prevent new crusting. Another material rarely used but very effective is a stone mulch, either crushed or whole. Usually only half as much of this is needed. It is attractive, requires only occasional raking, may be walked on (fine for terraces, patios, and under trees), permits easy entry of water, and does not track into the house even after rain. Watering is important, too. The average garden and lawn needs an inch of rain or its equivalent per week. The easiest way to know when your sprinkler has been on long enough is to scatter a few coffee cans as gauges. When ithey have caught an inch of water, turn it off. La,stly,j continue to mow your lawn! inot by the calendar, but by! need. For all purpose lawns' the ideal height to set the mower is two inches in thf North and three from the lat itude of Louisville and sout' for northern type grasse; Likewise, don't let the gras grow too long in between. Tht shock to the grass is too severe. It is better to mow with every inch of gro^vth. "I can't do a thing with my hair" is a phrase familiar to most women yet today more than ever before, women are able to "do things" with their hair and with far less effort and in far less time than in days gone by. Imagine the good ladies of ancient Rome. Many of them were brunettes; however, it was extremely fashionable to be blonde. It also was a very messy process to become a blonde. First the ladies would use liquid dyes made from saffron or putrified leeches; then they would stand for hours in the hot sun, combing, wetting and drying. Often they fainted from sunstroke, which prompted the clever ladies of •Venice to have special rooms luilt at the tops of their homes in which they could rest comfortably while drying their tresses in the sun. These were probably the first home hair dryers, say beauty authorities. Later Roman women discovered there was a way to achieve faster results in becoming blonde—^with a wig. The most desirable were made from the hair of captured Germanic prisoners, some of whom had bleached their locks with exceptionally strong soap. Through the years hair care and styling was done in the privacy of the cave, the home or the palace. Wealthy Greek and Roman ladies often imported hairdressers from far away places such as Asia or Sicily. They became part of the household and Catherine dis'Medici took Italian hairdressers with her when she became queen of France. It was reported Monsieur Dage, Madame de Pompadour's hairdresser, received 250,000 francs annually for tending the lady's tresses, and during the reign of Louis XVI, court coiffeurs were said to have received even more for styling the elaborate and opulent coifs of the time. Following the French Revolution when hair — and heads —tumbled, ladies adopted the classic styles of ancient Greece and Rome, and during the Victorian era, hair took on the prim and proper look. Later, with the advent of special equipment and tech­ niques, beauty salons took over as the place for hair care and styling which formerly had been done at home. Today, however, there's been a swing back to home hair care with development of home permanent kits and carefully diagrammed setting and styling instructions requiring little effort on the part of the lady. Twentieth century innovations, such as professional home dryers, make drying far more convenient than sitting in the sun. Also, they permit the busy modern woman to create her coiffure easily and quickly in any kind of weather in the comfort of her own home while watching television or talking on the telephone. Science, too, has helped today's woman keep her hair beautiful by keeping it healthy - a far cry from fashionable ladies of 18th century London who relied on a Siberian with the improbable name of Ivan Peter Alexis Knout- schouschlervitz. Her specialty was filling the high hairdos of the day with aromatic herbs to prevent the "disagreeable effects of perspiration." IMPISH IMPRESSION — Looking something like a shaggy leprechaun, this model exemplifies the "impish" trend for spring. Her "hair hat," designed by Heiser in New York, is the final touch for a wild outfit over leotards. Open Tuesday and Friday to 9:00 p.m.—Daily till 5:30 (7/ of a SPECIAL GROUP Ail Occasion DRESSES Were $29.95 to $89.95 $ 14 1 SPECIAL GROUP SHORTS Were $9.00 to $73.00 G. WEISS' TWICE YEARLY BARGAIN EVENT!! Begins Tomorrow —9 a.m. WHAT IS A DAISY? A DAISY is a mink trim coat reduced from $160 to $76 ... a group of shorts reduced from $12.00 to $6.49 ... a dress reduced from $89.95 to $14 . . . and many other special bargains reduced at least V2 price and many more than half price. The DAISY sales ticket marks the many unbelievable savings on summer and spring fashions at G. WEISS INC. PICK YOUR "DAISY" EARLY. HUNDREDS OF SUMMER DRESSES Only twice yearly does G. Weiss put so many fresh new cottons, prints, silks, knits and cocktail dresses on sale, so drastically reduced. $ LAST YEAR'S WINTER COATS Originally to $160 As Low As 19 to $ 29 Originally to $89.95 ' SUMMER SUITS »28 SPRING COATS REDUCED 1 / AT LEAST PRICE Slacks • Skirts 1 SPORTSWEAR"^: o V2 All Sales Final O.WEISS INC 313 Sixth Street

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