The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin from Racine, Wisconsin on July 4, 1965 · Page 1
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July 4, 1965

The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin from Racine, Wisconsin · Page 1

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Racine, Wisconsin
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Sunday, July 4, 1965
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THE RACINE JOURNAL-TIMES VOL. 35, No. 87 Fear Record of Deaths on U.S. Highways CHICAGO —m— High way fatalities mounted Satur day at a rate which safety experts said indicated a rec ord number of deaths would occur during this Fourth of July weekend. A total of 163 deaths was reported through late Saturday evening. The National Safety Coun cil said this was considerable ahead of the 1964 4th of July weekend when 510 persons perished — a record for three-day Independence Day observance. Five persons in one car died near Waterloo, N. Y., Saturday when their vehicle col lided head-on with a Grey hound bus. Authorities said the auto had crossed the center mall of the rain-slicked superhighway. It was the most spectacular and tragic accident reported so far. Highways Jammed Roads were clogged as millions of motorists sought a holiday change of pace from normal routine. The weather was generally fair over the nation but safety experts urged extra vigilance by motorists because of the heavy traffic. The Safety Council has estimated that in the 78 hours which started at 6 p.m. Friday and ends at midnight Monday between 470 and 570 persons will lose their lives in traffic mishaps. The council figures that motorists will drive a total of nine billion miles before the weekend period ends. The council said that in a corresponding summer weekend period of 78 hours not involving a holiday a total of 435 deaths were reported on the highways. RACINE, WIS., SUNDAY, JULY 4, 1965 50 PAGES->5 SECTIONS—20 CENTS CAR. TRAIN CRASH KILLS ONE IN STATE (By the Associated Press) Wisconsin recorded its first death of the holiday weekend in a car-train crash in Juneau County. John L. Becker, 53, of Necedah died late Saturday when his car and a Milwaukee Road freight train collided at a crossing two miles west of New Lisbon in Juneau County. The car was removed from the tracks after the New Lisbon fire department put out a fire in the demolished late model auto. The state's traffic toil climbed to 430, compared with 483 on July 3, 1964. 1,400 U.S. Troops Are Called Home —AP Wlrephoto Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson beckoned to members of the Homer Thornberry family to move in closer to take home movies of her at the LBJ Ranch Sat< urday. The movie-making was part of ceremonies at which Thornberry was sworn in as judge of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. A Look at 7 'CWes' Whaf Is Happening In Independence? (By the Associated Press) What are seven American communities named "Independence" doing on Independence Day? Planned activities range from nothing to a "whingding- er." At Independence, Mo., the city's best known resident, former Pres. Harry S. Truman, will be the main speaker at the annual July 4 observance — which this year will be held on the 5th. The program, at the Truman Library, will begin with concert by the American Legion Band of greater Kansas City. Kansas Counterpart The Missouri Independence (population about 81,000), which is the county seat of Jackson County, was named in for for Pres. Andrew Jackson recognition of his stand independence. At Independence, Kan., in the southeast part of the state, the city (population 11,750) will mark its 95th Fourth of July celebration. Alf M. Landon, 1936 Republican presidential candidate, resided in the Kansas community until he became governor. Actress Vivian Vance and Pulitzer prize-winner Playwright William Inge also hail (Turn to Page 2A, Col. 1) iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii No Paper Monday The Racine Journal-Times will not be published Monday because of the July 4 holiday. Mllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Russ Back Out on Cambodian Parley Plans MOSCOW — (JP) — The Soviet Union disclosed Saturday it has shelved plans for an international conference to guarantee the neutrality of Camboia. The apparent death blow to hopes of bringing major parties in the Viet Nam crisis to a conference table came in a Soviet statement to the British ambassador in Moscow Wednesday. Tass published the text of an oral statement on the Cambodian conference to British Ambassador Sir Humphrey Trevelyan. The Russians, on April 3, had formally proposed joint Soviet-British action to convene a meeting in Geneva on the Cambodian question. The British accepted the proposal, along with the United States and other pro-Western countries, on April 26. After that, nothing further was heard from the Russians until Saturday. The Soviet statement said Russia still supports the idea of a conference, but noted: "The government of Cambodia is now preparing a draft declaration on the recognition of neutrality and territorial integrity of its country — a declaration which the states concerned may approve sep- ately." Thus, the statement implied, there is no need for a meeting. The Soviet government proceeds from the assumption that Cambodia is the most interested side in the questions of insuring its neutrality and territorial integrity and believes that the co-chairmen should reckon with its position on this issue in the first place," the statement said. Expect Dominican Agreement Soon on Forming Provisional Government -Journal-Times Photo Karen Wentzell, 6, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Wentzell of 819 Wolff St., and her sister, Janet, 4, looked at Barney and ventriloquist Carl Heigl, 13, of 200 Sheffield Drive. Heigl, son of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Heigl, won a first Saturday night in the Goodwill Talent Show. (Another picture, page 6A). Johnson Orders Withdrawal from Dominican Force JOHNSON CITY, Texas — (JP)—An additional 1,400 U.S. troops will be coming home soon from the Dominican Republic, President Johnson announced Saturday. Johnson, acting on the recommendation of the troop commanders of the Inter- American Force guarding the uneasy truce in Santo Domingo, ordered the withdrawal of two battalions of the 82d Airborne Division. The president said in a statement that Gen. Hugh Panasco Alvim of Brazil, commander of the force, and the deputy commander, U.S. Lt. Gen. Bruce Palmer Jr., advised him "conditions in the Dominican Republic now permit further withdrawal of United States military personnel , . ." OAS Concurs He said also the generals' recommendation has the concurrence of the special com- City Parade, Concerts to Mark Goodwill Fete WASHINGTON — UP) — U.S. policymakers expect new chapter in the Dominican story to begin shortly with an announcement in Santo Domingo of agreement on a pro visional government. It is understood that President Johnson's newly announced order for a further U.S. paratroop withdrawal is based on an encouraging assessment of the Dominican political outlook as well as on the recent dropoff in shooting incidents. The Organization of American States' negotiating team at Santo Domingo is reported to be putting the finishing touches on a plan under which a Dominican provisional government would be created to succeed the regime overthrown April 24. Elections for a regular government would be held some months hence, perhaps early next year. Doctor Acceptable Both the junta and the rebel factions are said to have found a well-known Dominican doc- What's Where Business News .. Page 7C Editorial Page 14A Local News Page 6A Sports Page IC Television Page lOA Radio Page lOA Theater Page 12A Women's News ..Page IB tor, Felix A. Goico, acceptable as head of a caretaker regime. If no last-minute hitches de velop, U.S. officials figure an agreement can be announced within the next few days. U.S. pleasure at the prospect of clearing this obstacle in the Dominican difficulty is tempered by expectation of a long and arduous job still ahead in rebuilding the revolt- shattered Caribbean country. So far about $40 million in American economic aid — not counting expenditures for U.S. troops—has gone into keeping the Dominican economy afloat since April. Substantial U.S. aid is expected to continue for years. Lengthy Process The process of building genuine Democratic institutions also is expected to take years. The 30-year Trujillo dictatorship, in the opinion of U.S. officials, left the population sorely lacking experience in self-government and in the civic consciousness which is the backbone of a Democratic society. Meanwhile, three shots were fired Saturday at the Santo Domingo home of former Pres. Joaquin Balaguer, who returned this week from exile to announce he would be a presidential candidate. The shots came from a car that sped past the house. One bullet smashed a glass panel in the front door of the house. The others apparently hit a retaining wall. A policeman guarding the house said he fired four times at the fleeing car but did not think he hit it. Balaguer said he slept through the shooting and dismissed it as a matter of no importance. Vietnamese Pilot Killed by Viet Cong SAIGON — (^) — A Viet Cong gun crew on a sampan shot down a Vietnamese Air Force AlE Skyraider, killing its pilot, a U.S. military spokesman reported Saturday. The spokesman said the plane was shot down about 60 miles south of Saigon in Vinh Binh Province. He did not say whether the Vietnamese pilot's body had been recovered. Sunny skies and pleasant temperatures were expected for the climax today and Monday of Racine's 29th annual 4th of July Goodwill celebration. The climax includes concerts and a drum corps competition today and a 100-unit parade and a fireworks display on Monday. Forecasters said it would become partly cloudy on Monday but that temperatures will continue mild with a high today in the mid 80s. Parade on Monday The parade will get underway at 10 a.m. Monday—an hour after the first pre-parade units start down the route— and will move from Goold and N. Main Sts. down N. Main and Main Sts. to 14th St., then west to Park Ave. where it will disband. The fireworks display from South Pier in the downtown lakefront area will conclude the six-day celebration at 9:15 p.m. Monday, said Kenneth Weill, Goodwill president. The first of today's two concerts will be at 3 p.m. at Zoo Park with the Park Board Band. Trio to Perform At 7 tonight, Frederick Schulte will conduct the Racine Musicians Union Little Symphony Orchestra at Pershing Park. The concert will include a performance by the Ricchio Trio, which has Frankie and Oscar Ricchio and Billie Houck. The group, formed when Frankie returned from (Turn to Page 6A, Col. 4) 11II11IIIII111 III •••III I nil I mil lilt nil 11 nil iiiiiiii mi iiiii Goodwill Events for Today, Monday 3 p. m. today — Park Board Band Concert at Zoo Park. 7 p. m. today — Racine Musicians Union Little Symphony at Pershing Park. 7 p.m. today — Goodwill Spectacular Drum and Bugle Corps Competition at Horlick Athletic Field, or at Memorial Hall in event of rain. 10 a. m. Monday 29th Annual Goodwill Parade. 1 - 5 p.m. Monday — Free Treats for Youngsters at Pershing Park. 2 p.m. Monday — Show by Goodwill Talent Contest winners at Pershing Park, or Memorial Hall in event of rain. 3 p.m. Monday — Goodwill ceremonies at Pershing Park, or Memorial Hall in event of rain. 4:30 p.m. Monday— Marshall High School Jazz and Concert Band at Pershing Park, or Memorial Hall in event of rain. 7:30 p.m. Monday—Park Board Band holiday concert at Pershing Park, or Memorial Hall in event of rain. 7:30 p.m. Monday — Surprise show at Lake Michigan near Memorial Hall. 9:15 p.m. Monday—Goodwill fireworks display from South Pier. In addition, amusement rides will be operated at Pershing Park from 1-11 pm. today and Monday. Illllllllllllllllll MIIIIIIIMIIII I IIIIIIIIIMIM Justice, Kin Perish in State Plane Crash ONLY A FEW NOTICE MISSPELLING—After two children were hit by cars in a school zone which was saturated with warning signs on utility poles, Deputy Police Chief James E. Newell Jr. painted the word "children" on the pavement in Franklin, N.H., to see how many drivers would notice the backward "E." After a week's test, only four persons reported the mis­ spelling. —AP Wirephoto i' it MINERAL POINT—(/¥)—A justice of the peace and his step-brother from Michigan were killed Saturday night as a single-engine plane plunged into a pasture near this southwestern Wisconsin community. The victims were identified as Ray Osborne, 50, Barneveld, the pilot, and Edwin O. Anderson of Buchanan, Mich. Anderson had arrived earlier in the day for a Fourth of July weekend visit. Iowa County Deputy Coroner Charles V. Galle said the private plane plummeted into the farm field after taking off from the Mineral Point Airport 1 1/2 miles from the crash scene. He said the cause of the accident was unknown. The plane was "completely demolished," said Galle. Both men were killed on impact. The deputy coroner said the pair had stopped to refuel at Mineral Point on an apparent holiday weekend pleasure flight. They had taken off earlier from an airport at Mount Horeb, 15 miles west of Madison. Osborne was an experienced pilot and a member of the Civil Air Patrol, Galle said. Mineral Point is 8 miles south of the county seat of Dodgeville. mittee of the Organization of American States and U.S. Am- bassadbi- W. Tapley Bennett. "It will be an orderly withdrawal beginning next week," White House press secretary George E. Reedy told newsmen. Asked whether the action could be interpreted as a new sign of hope for the solution of the political crisis in the island republic, Reedy said: "We are hopeful as we have been from the beginning that a satisfactory solution will be found." 10,900 Yanks Remain The new withdrawal will reduce to about 10,900 the number of U.S. troops and airmen on duty at Santo Domingo. This compares with peak strength of about 22,000. In Washington, the Defense Department identified the two battalions that will return as the 1st Battalion of the 508th Airborne Infantry and the 1st battalion of the 505th. The first of the two battalions will return to the United States within a week, the Defense spokesman said, and the other shortly thereafter. Monetary Committee Johnson announced also the creation of high-level advisory committee on international monetary affairs, took care of some other government business and still found.time for a bit of relaxation. He also saw an old friend, U.S. District Judge Homer Thornberry, sworn in as a judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. The swearing-in took place on the front porch of the LBJ Ranch near here. State District Judge Herman Jones of Austin, another longtime friend, administered the oath while Johnson watched and Lady Bird took home movies of the event. Johnson made a brief speech to the dozen or so invited guests, praising the new appellate judge in these words: "We know there is no more courageous person, no better or finer human being, no man with a greater sense of justice and fairness." Thornberry Is 56 Thornberry, who is 56 as is the president, succeeded Johnson in the House when Johnson went to the Senate. Johnson told newsmen "We (the Johnson family) are going to have a lot of fun" during a quiet and restful Fourth of July holiday weekend. He said he started the day with an early mom'"<? phone (Turn to Page 2A, Col. 2) Racine Area WEATHER Fair and warmer today. Partly cloudy tonight and Monday. Continued mild. High today mid SOs and low tonight low 60s. Southwest winds 10 to 25 m.p.h. today. ELSEWHERE IN STATE Fair south to central. Partly cloudy extreme north and warmer today. Partly cloudy tonight with chance of scattered showers north portion. Monday partly cloudy and cooler in the north and central sections. High today in the 80s and low tonight 54 to 60 north and in the low 60s south.

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