Arizona Republic from Phoenix, Arizona on November 4, 1969 · Page 18
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November 4, 1969

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Arizona Republic from Phoenix, Arizona · Page 18

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Phoenix, Arizona
Issue Date:
Tuesday, November 4, 1969
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Page 18
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Page 18 article text (OCR)

KtPUBUU REPUBLIC 2 elections for governor test Nixon as campaigner Associated Press President Nixon tests the political strength of his White House base for the first time today in gubernatorial elections in New Jersey and Virginia. He campaigned personally for Republican candidates in both states. Additional interest in an •"Off-year election is focused on a number of cities holding mayoralty elections, including New Yof k s where Mayor John V. Lindsay is a 5-2 favorite for re-election, despite his defeat in last spring's Republican primary. The only congressional race Involved is the seat in New Jersey's 8th District, where the incumbent, Rep. Charles Joelson, D-NJ, resigned to become a state court judge. Contesting for the seat are Republican Eugene Boyle, a restaurateur, and Democrat Robert A. Roe, the state's conservation commissioner. For the first time since his own presidential campaign of a year ago, Nixon took to the stump in both New Jersey ; and Virginia. ! He sought votes in Virginia ; for Republican Linwood Hol> t ton, who also has the backing ' of state labor and civil rights ; leaders. Nevertheless, Holton was rated a slight underdog , to Democratic aspirant Wil; liam C. Battle. The latter was ' endorsed by most of his par- l ty's leaders, including U.S. Killer meted 2 life terms Associated Press WASHINGTON - A federal judge sentenced the unrepen- tent killer of two FBI agents yesterday to two consecutive life terms rather than death to deny him "the luxury of all the special attention a capital penalty would generate." Judge Gerhard A. Gesell, in U.S. District Court, described the convicted Billie Austin Bryant as "escape motivated, incorrigible and extremely dangerous," and said: "he can only be controlled in an institution like Atlanta or Leavenworth." .;. "The capital penalty, if .imposed, would keep him here indefinitely in the death cell 61 our antiquated jail," Gesell said. "Several years might pass while various appeals and hearings ran their course. If a new trial became necessary because of new legal doctrine relating to the capital penalty no one can tell whether essential witnesses would be available." '.Bryant will serve the life terms after he completes an 18-to 54-year term, for robbery and'assault. •The 30-year-old Bryant was found guilty by a jury Oct. 28 of, shooting FBI agents Edwin B. Woodriffe, 27, and Anthony Palmisano, 26, last Jan. 8 as they stood in the doorway of his wife's apartment here. They and another agent were attempting to question Bryant about a bank robbery that occurred earlier in the day in suburban Maryland. Judge Gesell fixed the sentence because the jury had been unable to decide between life and death penalties. Sen. Harry F. Byrd Jr., heir to a powerful Virginia Democratic dynasty. Nixon's choice in New Jersey was Republican William T. Cahill, a six-term congressman, running against former Democratic Gov. Robert B. Meyner. Both sides viewed the outcome as a toss-up. Meyner attacked the White House Vietnam policy, while Cahill supported Nixon's program of measured troop withdrawals. In New York City, the Daily News poll showed Lindsay a heavy favorite for a second term over Democrat Mario A. Procaccino and Republican John Marchi. The newspaper's survey has never been wrong in a mayoralty race in seven New York City mayoral polls. Lindsay began as the underdog after he lost the GOP primary to Marchi, a state senator from Staten Island. Spending more than his two opponents combined, Lindsay launched a comeback championing the city's minorities and criticizing the Vietnam war, saying the billions expended there could be put to better use in meeting the urban crisis. Lindsay is running as a candidate of the Liberal Party, which exists only in New York State, and as an independent. However, he has drawn support from liberal leaders from both major political parties. Procaccino, city comptroller under Lindsay, started out as favorite in the race. But the News poll now shows him with only 27 per cent of the vote, compared to 48 per cent for Lindsay. He has stressed law and order in his campaign. Also emphasizing law and order was Marchi, to whom the News poll gives 23 per cent of the vote. He has- run a low-key campaign, supported by the state's Conservative Party. Marchi was little known outside state legislative circles until he defeated Lindsay in the GOP primary. There are Negro candidates for mayor in Cleveland, Detroit and Hartford, Conn. Cleveland's Democratic incumbent, Carl B. Stokes, was the first black mayor of a major U.S. city. He is opposed for re-election by white Republican Ralph J. Perk. There have been racial undertones to the issue of con- trol of the police force, and the contest is seen as close. Detroit's Negro candidate for mayor is Richard Austin, Wayne County auditor, opposed by Wayne County Sheriff Roman 'Gribbs, who is white. Gribbs says race is not an issue in the campaign, but Austin claims the contest would be less of a toss-up and more in his favor if he were white. In Hartford, Wilher Smith, an official of the state NAACP, is one of three candidates seeking to unseat the incumbent Republican mayor, Ann Ucce'llo. The city's voter registration is 3V 2 -1 Demo- cratic, but Mayor Uccello may benefit by the party split involving her opponents. Also in Connecticut, a potential split in the Democratic Party in New Haven may work to the advantage of Republican mayoral candidate Paul Capra, a Yale University official. The incumbent, Democratic Mayor Richard C. Lee, is not running after 16 years in office. The Democratic organization is backing Bartholomew Guida, president of the Board of Aldermen. However, State Sen. John DiRienzo bolted the party and is run- ning as an independent, opposing the Democratic machine. In other races: Mayor Frank A. Sedita of Buffalo, N.Y., is seeking reelection on the Democratic- Liberal tickets, and his opponent is Republican- Conservative Alfreda W. Slominski. Issues include law and order and school busing. RESIDENTS.. 80 STAFF 58 VILLAGE GREEN NURSING HOME 2932 N. 14th Sf. 264-5274 CITY MAIL Phoenix, Tues,, Nov. 4, 1969 63 The Arizona Republic. 9 THI BRA ... like no other The miracle bra, lift! and shapes tht large bust ... the small bust appears larger. Design patented by Pennyrich. Complete comfort I No strap strain! Sold by expert (itters. Dacron polyester and cotton or nylon lace. 8.50 to 18.50 Sizes 21 to «, A to G6. Pennyrich Bras 264-3746 Globe-Miami Area ..425-2078 Williams 635-2040 Flagstaff 774-8338 SHOP BLOOM'S FOR YOUR RIGHT SIZE SHORT Portly & Athletic Models (Taper Style) We fit them all . . . From head to foot Clothing Size Sriiatt to 4x 29 to 60 For Dress, Work, Western Wear & Sports Wear Large Selection of Nationally Known Brands in Suits, Sports Coats, Shirts, Shoes, Socks, Underwear, Sweaters, Jackets & Pants '•master charge] THE BIGGEST & TALLEST MEN IN ARIZONA BUY THEIR CLOTHES AT ' Q 9 lOpcn Thuri. Nights 1538 E. McDowell MEN'S SHOP Phone 258-tMl It's also peace of mind. It's comforting to know your electric furnace is flameless... has no pilot light to go out or be relighted... no burner to whoosh or roar. And because it needs no flues it can be installed anywhere... in a closet, in the ductwork or outside the house. It circulates fresh, clean refrigerated air all through your home. It wrings the excess moisture out of the air, filters out dirt and most pollens, so your house will stay cleaner and you'll feel better. • Electric heating and electric cooling... the perfect pair to keep you toast-warm in the winter, cucumber-cool in the summer. And if you live in the Salt River Project area your operating costs will be surprisingly low. For your free copy of this informative booklet phone the Salt River Project.,, 27&WQQ, I •

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