Lubbock Avalanche-Journal from Lubbock, Texas on April 3, 1975 · Page 32
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April 3, 1975

Lubbock Avalanche-Journal from Lubbock, Texas · Page 32

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Thursday, April 3, 1975
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2*A—IUBBOCK AVALANCHE.JOURNAU-Thursday Evening. April 3. I97S Data Shows Deer, Cattle Can Share .Research projects al Texas Tech University indicate deer and cattle can graze the same West and North Central Texas range land without causing problems. -Jn studies on two adjoining ranches in Haskcll, Shackelford and- Throckmorton counties, researchers noted Uie seasonal diets of white-tailed deer and cattle showed "little competition existed." Grasses made up the bulk of the cattle diets at all seasons. Shrubs were the most Important food item for deer, except for the fall period when forte (broad-leafed weeds and other plants) were most preferred. The other project, near Eden south of Sati Angelo, will not be complete for another year, but researcher Mark E. Byard said •preliminary data indicates that the presence or absence of cattle on pastures made no significant difference in deer densities. The surveys are under the flirection and supervision of Dr. Dee A. Quinton, professor of wildlife management at Texas Tech. Most of (he field work and Hie reporting of the North Central Texas project were done by graduate student R. G. Horejsi, whoso master's degree thesis was based on the findings. Irotnvood. polecat brush and pelolazo were the main food Items of deer in the summer. During the fall their diets shifted to foi-bs with prickly pear and spreading sicla the most important. Mistletoe comprised almost 70 per cent and mesquite 10 per cent of winter deer diets, Mistletoe also was their primary forage in the spring. Only in the fall and winter was there some competition between the deer and cattle for food. During those seasons ap- pvoximatey 17. per cent of the cattle diet was shrubs and during the spring and summer that proportion dropped to 4 per cent. Cattle also increased their forbs diet to 15 per cent in the spring. The ranches on which the north central Texas studies were made were the Crooked River with more than 28,000 acres and Hendrick's with 14,000 acres adjoining the Crooked River cm the south. The Clear Fork of the Brazos River traverses the Crooked River from the souttnvest to the northeast and the Hendrick's in a-south to north direction. The area is contrasted by low areas near the river bed and high, rugged, almost mountainous areas on the cast side. Areas along the river are rolling with 500-foot elcvational differences between rivcrbottom and adjacent ridge tops. Varying stages of range and brush control practices have been applied in the m-eas, including spraying, chaining and dozing. Browse Heavily Used Horejsi said data showed that browse accounted for more than 50 per cent of the yearly diets on all treatment areas except two. Tliose two areas had -undergone extensive control programs to remove all brush. In both areas forbs represented a dominant portion of the seasonal diets of deer. "Analysis of the different brush control practices indicated that white-tailed deer are able to cope with limited habitat manipulations which occur under brush control programs," he said. ''If suitable cover is available, they ar e able to shift their food habits sufficiently to maintain themselves in a normal manner. "This was demonstrated on the two areas having extensive control measures — bulldozed upland and sprayed-chained-rcs- prayed upland. Here deer, diets showed a significant switch from browse to forb usage, especially prickly pear." Problems arising with brush control programs and wildlife management center primarily around cover removal and not forage changes, the Texas Tech researcher said. Deer must have escape, and resting cover for survival. "Indications from this study are that total hrush eradication over extensive areas will eliminate deer," he said. "Selective control practices or pattern arrangements will allow maintenance of wildlife populations." Brushy -basal sprouts of mesquite and other browse species on the brush controlled upland appear to offer adequate cover for deer. Horejsi said results of the study strengthen the sugges lions for "brush control programs. Designs that show patchwork arrangements of such natural travel ways as ravines, creeks, and gulleys appear most beneficial. These patchwork arrangements increase the amount of "edge" and interspersion of the welfare factors for wildlife. L AGRICULTURAL MARKETS ] Mercantile CHICAGO (AP) — Futures iradfUR on the Chicago Mercantile Exchunuc \Ytdnesday: Frev Open HlKh Low Close. Close IIVE BEEt' CATTLE (W.UflO ll>5) Aw 41.65 '11.85 -11.05 11.35 «00 Juu 42,13 42.15 41.03 41.10 «.12 Aliji 10 .JO -tO.'.'? 39,52 JSl.S'i 4(1.32 Ol-l 3U.50 30.50 3S.65 3U.OO 3950 JJe<.' Sa.iT) 39.1'ii 3S.15 M. 1? S320 rob 39,00 ;U,13 36.10 MK50 3U.15 snleu: April 'J1U5; Juno ;ms; AUB 1267; Oct 248; Dec ITS; Fob 92. Open interest: April -1870; June 1JM1; AUB 6571: Oct 1712; Dec 17M; Fob M5. FKKUJilt CATTLE (42,000 Ibs) Am- 32.;0 32.33 31.75 M2.25 32.BO .May 23.00 33.00 32.72 32.72 33.10 A«g 32.45 32.45 32.15 32.15 3'i 50 ,Sei< 31.95 32.00 31.85 n.USS 1J31.7S Ou :u,55 31.60 31.0) 31.00 31.50 Kqv ol.OO 31.40 51, IK) Ill.lX' 31.10 Sales: April 5: Way 18: AUK 2; i-'en 10: On 72; Nov 4. Opi'n iiHorrsl: Auril ">S; May aS; Auff .tt'J: sen K; Ort Tb'S; KOI- Si LIVE IHH;S (jo.ooo HIM) API- 41.55 41.75 '11.30 41.30 11.50 J.'ll 43.CII 45.SO 45.15 45.50 .15.70 Jul -16.4(1 46.55 40.00 4G.35 M.M Aus 45.35 45.80 44.05 845,05 45 23 Oil 41.60 44,75 43,95 4-1.25 4-1.40 P-c 44.90 45.10 44.20 44.35 4-1.I10 i'el) 44.60 44.70 44.00 44 00 44..13 API- 2.D5 43.10 42.45 -12.35 1>!2 HO Sales: Anvil 1570; June U5S: Julv COS: Auu 2SS; Oct SI; Dec 216; Fcb S3;" Aniil Open interest: Aiirll 1701; June 395'J: ;iuJ.v 2583; Aug 13?S; Oct 6W; Doc 1733; • Feb 583: Anrll 138. IDAHO POTATOKS (80.WW lhs> ,l!ay 5.43 5.60 SA'J S.fifl 543 Sales: Slay 5. Open interest; Way :>i). SHELL KdfiS C.'-'.SW dot) Apr 38.50 33.10 38.SO ^.Slt S8.SO May 40.23 40.50 40.10 4015 40.20 •'Ult 42.00 42.00 41.70 41.!'C 41 70 .Ilil 44.23 44.75 44.25 M4.75 43.HO Sci> S0.95 50.93 50.65 50.65 50.UO Saleu: April 2B; llay 78; June 26: July 2: Sen 14. Open interest: April 277; .May 1503: June C57: July 2; sep 353. t'KOZEX 1'OllK BELLIES C16.000 IbV) Way 70.SO 7150 10.10 7H.10 7140 Jt;l 71.55 71.SO 70.60 70.CO 71.70 AUK 70.50 70.88 6S.42 CH.52 70.35 i"«t> B8.50 6S.60 67.30 67.30 6S.2S Muf 68.25 GS.25 67.00 H(i7.0n h67.7o 3Uay 67.70 W.70 67.45 ;i!>7,'ij 1)68,50 sales: liny 2640; July 1S75; AUB 384; li'cb 95: Itarch 9; May 2. Open interest: May 4052; July 41B4; AU!,' 1251: Fcb D07; March 31; May 3. 1)—Bid: a—Asked; n—Nominal. LU.1IBEH (100.000 hrt (II ? ; r«y 143.00 144.50 141.50 142.00 143.30 .Tul 157.60 158,00 15-1.40 155.10 158.00 Sep Ml.OO 161.SO 158.10 138.20 161.20 Kov 15S.OO 356.00 153.00 153.50 156.00 Jan 155.50 155,30 153.50 153 30 Sales: May 35,5; July 400; Son 132; Nov K3: Jan 14. Gn.VIN SOUOtKIMS (100 Ibs) .Till .3S 4.3S 4.55 4.33 4,35 Seo 4.20 4.20 4,20 -1.20 4.13 D« 4.13 4.13 4.13 4.lit 4.03 i^alcs: .Tul.v 3; sep 1: Dte 1. XKST-nuN Eor;s ca.iw> fl<w.) Anr . 39.00 39.00 ;>Iay 41.M 41.50 .Tun 43.40 43.40 lien 4S.OII 40.00 aulea-; April 0; ilay 1); June 0; Seu 0. Board Of Trade CHICAGO (AP) - Farm commodity futures in the soybean complex fell sharply in 1he closing minutes on the Chicago Board of Trade Wednesday. Soybean oil declined the limit of 100 points, or 1 cent a pound, and soybeans were down 18 cents, just 2 cents short of a limit move. Soybean Tneal lost about 53 a ton. Com and oats futures also came under lale selling pressure. Oats were down about 2 <:e!its and corn 3 cents. Wheat futures rose 2 cents. Iced broilers were up about !i cent a pound in very poor trade. The selling pressure in the soybean complex got undei way when the rumor of Brazil- inn selling of oil abroad again became known Tuesday and with its circulation Wednesday more weight was attached to it and five options touched Hie bottom in the oil pit. Because of the weakness in. oil, soybeans came under' strong selling pressure as buyers backed off. Soybean meal .raded in a fairly narrow range but rarely above the previous close. Wheat futures displayed firmness through most of the Cession on word of improved exports. There was dome concern :oo, about a lack of cover in some winter wheat sections, trade sources noted. Mew precipitation over sections of the Middle West, while checking some farm field work tended to improve subsoil con- Sent and soiling resulted in (he 'utures pit. There was hedging also, reportedly as insurance against purchases of corn in ;he country. Gold futures on domestic exchanges were down $1 to nearly 2 an ounce in very slow trade. At the close, soybeans were 15 to 18 cents a bushel lower, May 5.90; wheat was 1 to 2 n'gher, May 3.85%; corn was 2% to 3 higher. May 3.(Wi and oats were Ivi lower to % higher, May 1.5r) ; ;i. CHICAGO (AP) — Futures trading on Board or Trade Wednes- Trev belt may delay land prepara- i>r<?ds 25.75; canner »na cutter 17.50-22.50. tions in planting of the 1975 cot- TOK^TORTH. TC*. fAp> - catuo sso-. tan crop which is scheduled to begin around mid-month, created buying of futures, brokers said. The average price for strict low middling 11-16 inch spot cotton advanced 21 points to 39.87 cents a pound Tuesday for the ten leading markets, according to the New York Cotton Exchange. NEW YORK (AP) — Cotton No. 2 futures Wednesday on the New 1'ork Cotton Close , Tex. (AP) — Cattle 350; slaughter cows steady to strong, slaughter bulls and slaughter calves and yearlings not established, feeder cattle and calves aliout steady. Slaughter COMB: utility 2L25-24.10, hiuh yielding 15.40; cutter 13.00-22.60. Feeders: mixed good and choice 600-725 Ib steers 2S.10-2S.OO, sood 450-625 Ibs 23.25-27.70. Choice 350-400 Ib licircrs 24.50-25.70. good 3J5 GOO Ibs 20.25. 22.00. Choice 350-360 Ib bulls 30.00-30.30. liood 330-623 Ibs 23,25-26.00. O)i«n HlRli I,ow COTTON NO. 3 (50,0(11) His) Vrer May .Ful Ocl May Jul 43.55 4-1.30 4S.80 40.50 47.10 •IS.UO 4S.T5 43,!P9 •H.liJ •ili.18 •1S.FS 47.63 48,03 •JS.75 4S 22 43.01 43.45' 'IS.64 •14.10 44.30 •1S.7S Wj.S'i 1)45.49 46.45 -W.tt) 48.25 47.:)5 U47.35 1146.93 4K.OO M7.SO 1)17.55 4S.75 1)18.40 blS.15 Sales 1,550. b-lild LUBDOCK SPOT COTTON Quotations are the approximate prices reported to Hie Agricultural Marketing Service tor dualities equal to Hi" U K Official Grade and staple Standards Prices are for micronairc (mike) readings of 3.S through '1.3. in mixed Sots uncompressed, free of all chnracs in the warehouse in the market. Price trend: higher. M SLM LM MLS SLMLS tAOJi (3D «» (61) (33) <K> (53) Itic Chlcaiio day: Open Hiili Low Close WHEAT (3.000 hii) May 3.65 3.67 3.62 3.R5K, 3.S4 1 - 1 . Jui 3.70 :t.73 3,68 3.71 3.70 Sep 3.77M, 3.78K 3.74 3.7< 3.75 Dec 3.S7 3.87V' 3.SI1 B.S6-- 3.K4!i Jlur 3.EI2 3.02 3.90 3.51 " 3.SO COHN (5,01)0 (ill) ..] 3.02 3.03^i iMUl S.OOVi 3.025!, Jut 3.00 3.01V« 2.97«i 2.?V 3.00VJ SCD -'gUVi 2.M> 2.85Vi 2.FSU 2.S9 Dec 2.74 2.74VS 3.70% 2.71V- 2.74 Mai- 2.79 2,60 aTSVl 2.76't 2.79 May 2.61 2.S1 2,80 2.80 OATS (5,000 bu) 23-32 .15-16 3132 . 1-32 1 1-16 1.58«i 1.5Sli 1.53 ; 1.52«i 153% 1.5fl'.i . ' —', 1.50 G.05 . 6.06 5. SO G.07 n.so S.ST 5.7SMl 5.92 5.SO 5.SS hil ^/*U 1UV,UW !>/>/ 30.15 30.1S 29.22 29.22 30.25 1'6.65 28.85 27.93 27.S3 29.85 27.S5 28.00 27.02 27.02 28.05 7.00 27.10 26.07 2S.07 27.10 211.00 26.00 25.00 25.00 26.00 25.00 25.00 23.UO 23.93 24.9 'i150 24.50 23.45 23.45 2-1.40 125.50 126.00 122.50 123.50 123.60 129.00 130.50 127.00 127.50 129.50 132.00 132.00 129.50 13000 132.00 Jlay Jul Sen _ Dec 1.49" LSO'ji 148% L30" SOl'BEAXS (3.UOO 6u) May 6.(B 6.05 5.69 5.90 Jul fi.05 6.05 5.6S ' Aui; B.02 6.05 5.8S Set) S.97 H.97 5.80 i\'ov T..59 S.91V1 5.75 Jan 5.05 5.65 5.79 .._ ..... ... Mar 6.02VJ 6.02W, 5.86V- 5.86V' 6.03 SOYBEIN OHL (00,000 May ---- ---Jut Au2 sen Oct. Dec; Jan Mar 24.03 24.05 23.05 SOVBEA.V Jllilt, (100 inns) May Jul Al.'tf . . . Sop 1S6.00 136.0 1032.00 1S2.50 135.00 On 137.50 137.50 135.00 135.00 137.00 Det 13U.50 140.00 137.50 138.30 140 00 Jan 142.50 142.50 139.50 110.50 i-ll.OO Mar 145.50 146.00 143.00 144.00 144.00 ICKfl Bltor/.lOKHS (28,000 flit) May 40.30 40.40 39.70 3D.M 40 Gi> Jua 40.20 40.20 39.55 ?,9.70 40.35 Jul 40.10 40.10 39.50 39.5(1 4020 All!* S9.40 39.40 32.10 39 20 39.70 Sou 33.60 38.60 3S.OO 33.00 SSS.70 No\- S7.00 37.00 37.00 37.00 37. Lo b-BId: a-Aslted: n-Nominal. SIM'EK (5.000 trny 01) Apr 430.00 431.00 415.30 41G.OO 428.03 May 433.00 434.00 419.SO 419.50 4SO.OO Jim 4S5.00 436.00 42LOO 42J.OO 432.00 All^ 439.50 442.00 42C.50 427 00 437 00 Oe! 446.00 449.00 433.00 434.00 44-1.00 nee 450.50 453.00 439.SO M9.50 449.00 Fob 458.50 45B.50 445.50 445.50 455.50 A«r 4S1.00 461.60 431.00 45T.OO 4S0.50 Jun 4C6.00 466.00 458.00 45S.OO 466.50 PLYWOOO (GS.130 s<l tt) May 136.00 137.80 133.SO 133. SO 138.00 Jul 139.00 W0.50 138.CO ISS.fiO 140.50 Sep 112.00 143.30 139.00 139.00 143 20 Xov 143.50 144.20 139.80 139.RO 14-V.50 .Tan (45.00 14T.OO 141.50 141.50 146.50 llov 144.50 144.M 142.50 142.50 147.50 Cotton NEW YORK (AP) — Cotton futures No. 2 closed $1.25 to $2.35 a bale higher Wednesday. Concern, that rains in Uie central portion of the cotton Readings 1Mb- Dal. bock las G & bcJon* -300 2.7 thru 2.9 3.0 thru 12 3.3 Him 3.4 3.5 thru 4.9 5.0 thru 3.2 & above OMAHA, Neb. <AP) (USDA)—Livestock quotations Wednesday: Hogs: 3.000; barrowa and gilts active, 1.00-1.50 higher, mostly 1.00-!.25 up; Us 1-.!. 210.240 Ib 40.75-11.00: W, 200-250'lb 40.25-10.7o; sows mostly 50 liluher: 320-600 lb 35.75-37.50. Cattle and calves: 3.500; steers and hoKcrs only moderately active prices full3- steady; cows moderately active strong, instances 25-50 hlcher; 2 loads choice and prime 1.150-1,225 lb steers •il.85-!2.00; choice 975-1.250 II) 40.00-4LSO, occasionally 4L75; choice and prime 9501.025 Ib heifers 40.75-11.00; choice 830-1.025 lb mainly 38,50-40.00; utility and com mercinl cows 22.50-24.50, some utility to 25.00; tew utility and commercial dairy Watch For It Soon! It's On The WAY! 4-3 S4.20 32-85 30.00 32.00 30.10 2S.95 39.85 34.40 31.05 33.55 31 65 30 05 37.3S 34.70 32.05 34.40 32.65 30.85 37.SD 35.40 32.35 34.80 33.15 31.45 3S.55 36.90 33.20 35.D5 33.95 3L60 35.15 39.25 33.35 36.85 34.00 31.65 AVHJI. 10 mkts.: KLi£ ] 1-16 at 40.21- previous day 39.87; week ago 3914; year a£n 536. Purciiasts: 4580 bales af Lubhocfc; previous day 5450; week ago 10.275; year CKo 536. U.S. spot purcliases: 41.051 bales; pre" Ul 31lKl! wwlc ° K ° 33 ' 742 : >•<>« MIKE DIFFEHENOES <rts. <. HOUJ- Mem- Jlkt. ton phi a Avirs. -630 -415 -3i70 0 -» -100 -SSO -514 -10! -300 -23S 0 0 '30 -30 -325 ^100 -150 -128 Livestock 2-3, 180 Ibs 34.00. Sows scarce, steady;' 1.5. 325500 Ibs 34.00-35.50. Boars 350-550 Ibs 2B.OO. 230-290 Ibs 30.00-32.00. feeder pigs 2-3. 125 Ibs 29.00. Sheep: none. Cash Grain HOUSTON (AP) — Sorghum No. 2 yelow: exDort 5.15-5.23. rail Uomestic o'.OS- 5.23. tl-uck ih.mpstic 5.25-5.30. Corn No. 2 yellow: export 3.1G-3.1S, rail domestic 3.17-3.10. truck domestic 3.25 5.3IJ, PORT WORTH (AP) — Hard wheat -1.30^-4.63%; exiwrt 4.18-i.nl. Yellow com 3.23-3.33. Oats 1.93'/.-1.07Hi. Yellow sorKlium 5.35-5.55. CIUCAGO CAP) — WJioat No 2 hard winter 3.91n Wednesday; Nn 2 soft red 301n. Corn No 2 yellow 3.09V 1 " (honner) 3.03VJn (box). Onls No 2 extra licavj wlille 1.70Kin. sqj-bcans No 1 yellow 6.01n No 2 yellow corn Tuesday was tiuotcti at 3.11n (Hopper) 3.05n (box). WHOLESALE riiOS NEW YORK (AP) — (USDA) — Whole sale ccc orferines adequate. Demand Inv uroved today. Wiolesale selling prices based on vol ume sales. • New York spot quotations follow: TOiites: Fancy lanre 47-18 Fancy medium 44-17 fancy smalls 37-H). TOTATO MARKETS CHICAGO (AP) — (USDA) — Major cotato markets FOB shlnpinc points U.S. 1A Tuesday in 100 lb sacks: Washington russets 4.00: Minnesota North Dakota Red River Valley round reds 2.15-2.50. mostls 2.30; Wisconsin russets 3.00-3.25, mostl} 300; Wisconsin round whiles 1.90-2.10 mostly 2.00.. USDA BUTTER A>T> EGOS CHICAGO (AP) — (USDA) ^ Butter: issued only on Tuesday, Thursday »nrt Friday. Eggs weak Wednesday; sales delivered warehouse, cartons unchanged; A extra large 50-53; A larse 49-51; A mediums 45 4S WOOL IT UTURES NEW YORK (AP) — Wool futures Wednesday on the New York Cotton Exchange. Onen Wel woor, (6.000 M:S) May 114.0 014.0 Sales 3. law Close I'rcr. 114.0 M13.0 bU4.5 Community Gardening Planned The West Texas Community Development Corp. announced today 1% plots are available for a spring-summer garden project here. The corporation is a nonprofit organization sponsored by the Lubbock Community Action Board. Location of the community-type garden project is an interior triangle at the intersection of Clovis Road, Quaker Avenue and Ursuline Avenue wi northwest Lubbock near the city limits. Registration will be at the •corner of Ursutine Street and Quaker Avenue from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, and April 12 and 13 at the same hours. Cost of a 20 by 50 toot plot will be §20 per person for those able to pay that amount. Gardeners unable to pay the $20 cost will receive plots to be financed •by donation. Last year, the community-type garden project fed an estimated 38 families as far as vegetables were concerned. Responsibility of 'the plot purchaser as to maintain the plot, including weeding, and to harvest plants. The responsibility of the corporation is to furnish water •and seed when available. By DON KENDALL WASHINGTON (AP) — .Breweries which have been.us. ig large quantities of rice for making premium quality beer re using less of that grain icse days and are turning to ower-priced corn grits, the Ag-- iculture Department says. Only two major breweries se rice to any degree, Anheu- er-Busch of St. Louis and Coors of Golden, Colo., an Agri- ulture Department expert aid. A report Wednesday by the epartment's Economic Re- earch Service said "the brew- ng industry's demand for rice ppears to be failing" and may otal about 7.5 million 100-pound iags this year. Swisher County Hosts Fanners TULIA (Special) — Robert G Lewis of Washington, D.C. secretary of the National Farm ers Union (FU), will speak here Saturday at the annual banque of the District 2 Texas Farmers Union. The Swisher County FU wil host the meeting, which will be gin at 7:30 p.'m. in the Ezra Jones school cafeteria. Lewis will speak on the future role of Texas farmers,in inter national agricultural trade. John Culwell of Tulia is presi dent of the Swisher County chapter. Other officers are Pa Georgy of Happy, first vic< president; Fred Boston of Tulia second vice president; and Hen ry Boston, also of Tulia, secre tary-treasurer. LUBBOCK AVALANCHE-JOURNM. EVENING Evening Edition of the, Lubbock Avilinckt. Journal. Printed it ilti and Avenue J. LuMwck, Texas 7B40S. Thoie 7K-R8H. Second CUsi ' $5.s; 3.50 3.50 t.3o I, JO 1.2» 1.85 «..1.M 'postage HOME OEL1VERY By The Month, Morning, Eveni«g,SUn4iy ......'. Morning & Sunday ..... Kventajf, Safurrfiy, Sunday.. MorntngOnly ........ „. ............. Kvenlng, Saturday O»4y ._ ....... .Sunday with Dwly $1. H+6< liv F.vcnlncOnly ........ .... .......... ,. Sunday Only }I.(2+8t ux M All. SUBSC Rl PTI ONS 1 Vr. 6. Mo. 3 Mo. I Mo. Morning! Sunday ....... J18.00 $21.00 J12.M M.OO Evmbig & Sunday ...... «.<» Z).M 12.08 4.M MornmgOnly...-. ......... 39. M I9.M S.M 3.30 Evening Only ............ .' KM 17.78 8.83 J.S5 Sunday Only .......... .... KM ISM 3.08 3.00 "WE HEAR A DIFFERENT DRUMMER" With proven success! Try our unique, personal brand ot real estate service. We deem ourselves worthy oj our hire! Use Jour attorney In all real estate transactions, Btrnie* Turc{uette, Mgr. 3217-34th 792. SIM 3-3. EDWARDS & ABERNATHIE, REALTORS Let Spring go to your head... with a new STRAW or CASUAL HAT! from $11 Molt Store Open Tonite til 9 Handsome spring straws and casual fabric hats to complete your wardrobe. Nothing fussy or formal, just masculine good looks. Colors and patterns and styles that will coordinate so easily! Wear a hat and see the difference that it mokes! Casual Hats from $ 7 Both Store* Straw hats from J l 1 Downtown Only Us* Your S&Q Account Matter Chargt, or BankAmcricard ^( MWMNrtt. CILOTIilBS: , S fork FREE dirictlf across ih* Jtrtet from S&Q Downtown •Do-wntowr. mna. South Plains Mall iliMrtiM' MM.-M, S:3I-5:1I Jit, tt I. IMI Mm.-Fri. 11-9 Sit. til 11 USDA Says Breweries Using Grits Missing License Leads To Arrest EAST ST. LOUIS, 111. (UPI) — Deputy Sheriff Willie Smith Jr. thought something was familiar about the license plate number on the car he saw as he cruised through East St Louis -WS270. It was the 'number he had ordered from the state but had lever received. Smith and his partner arrest id the driver of the car, Harrj Johnson, 33, of East St. Louis, on charges of possession of sto len license plates. Rice used'by breweries last /eafr amounted to a^record ot S.2 million hundredweight, • a ubstantial increase from only 5.6 million used annually during 1965-69. In the fermentation process, rice is believed by some brewers to impart a superior quality ;o beer in combination with corn or other grain and hops, There is plenty of rice avail- (ble but prices have been high n relation to corn for some ime. meaning' that breweries are being tempted to opt for the lower-priced ingredient, the department said. Rice farmers produced a record crop of 114.1 million hundredweight in 1974. Prices, although down sharply from their record season average of $13.78 per hundredweight a year before; stjlj are expected to average their second best at about J10.50 per bag* The department's report said that despite the cutback for beer making, rice use for the marketing year which will end July 31 is expected to total a record of 108.5 million hundredweight, up from 86.4 million 'in the 1973-74 season. About 37.3 million 100-pound bags will be used domestically for all purposes, including food and beer, and another record of 71.2 tnilion will be exported, the '.eport said. But despite the big usage, rice reserves this Sept. 1, when the 1975 crop season begins, will be up to 13.4 million bags. That would include leftovers from the 1974 and previous harvests. HONG KONG CUSTOM TAILORS IN LUBBOCK LAST 2 DAYS ONLY APRIL 344 Silk Mohilf Sulk Silk Shifkikln Suit* W».00 Wool Slwrlukin Sultt Mt.M Fln*W*fit*d Suits it.M Sport Coin M».W Cuit*mM*ctt Shlrtf .,...17.00 For Appointment Call W« CuMwn Hi Any SIM *r Tort* Or Visit Mr.T.T.Gill 762-06*1 In Town Inn 1202 Ma in Heuri» i.m. Te t p.m. TRinE KNIT SNAG PROOF SUITS *75 Special Offer Knit 2 suit. M 25 PHONE 782-0881 ASK FOR MR. GILL Diamonds, April's Beloved Birthstone SAVE 20% ON LOOSE DIAMONDS from our fabulous April CONSIGNMENT COLLECTION Thi's could be your "Diamond Deal of a lifetime"! Loose diamonds in sizes from '/i to 5 corals... a fabulous consignment collection in which we have no investment .... thus offered to you at 20% less than current market prices. You'lf be "Singing in the Rain" with the savings you'll, pocket by choosing the diamond of your dreams, now during Anderson's April Shower of Diamonds Sale! for an engagement Diamond, choose one of these! SALE ,50 ct. heart shape .55 ct. round .58 ct. oval .75 ct. pear shape Reg. $555. $444. 700. ^560. 610. 490. 945. 755. ,84 ct. round .VI ct. round 1.01 ct. round 1.25 ct. ovol Keg. SAIE S748. $598. 1,410. 1,128. 1,700. 1,360. 1,250. 1,000. is the Time to choose (he Liirger Diamond of Your Dreams 1.65 ct.' round 2.43 U. oval 3.12 ct. round 3.84 cf. round 5.10 ct. emerald-cut Reg. SAIE S2,400. $1,920. 13,320. 10,655. 9,065. 7,250. 17,760. 14,200. 20,350. 16,280. West Texas Oldest and Finest Jewelers DOWN1OWN • 4OOIM fUlNS MAIL SPACED PAYMENT PUNS MASTER CHARGE Oft BANKAMERICARD

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