The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on January 17, 1967 · Page 6
Get access to this page with a Free Trial
Click to view larger version

The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 6

Publication:
Location:
Algona, Iowa
Issue Date:
Tuesday, January 17, 1967
Page:
Page 6
Cancel
Start Free Trial

Page 6 article text (OCR)

6-A!gona, (la.) Upper Des Moinei Thursday, Jan. 19, 1967 WASHINGTON Merry-Go-Round WASHINGTON — However much North Vietnam's "new attitude" toward possible truce talks may be discounted, and however genuine it eventually proves to be, this much must be said for it: It is the first time Hanoi spokesmen have publicly declared to Western newsmen that their previous pre-conditions for a truce were not pre - condltons at all, but simply points for discussion. When this is added to the fact that a New York Times correspondent from the United States was permitted to enter North Vietnam and talk with government leaders, and U.N. Secretary General U Thant's earlier statement that a cessation of bombing might pave the way for bargaining, it does provide some ground for hope. In addition, aged Ho Chi Minn is reported by French diplomats to be personally weary of the war despite his boasts that his country will fight 10 or 20 or 50 years if necessary to win, and almost as anxious as President Johnson to go down in history as a man who finally brought peace to his people. But there are big and important questions which remain as barriers to any early peace, from Hanoi's continued insistence that the United States must cease bombing North Vietnam unconditionally and without promise of reciprocal de-escalation to whether the "new attitude" is what it appears to be. Eager as President Johnson is to find a way out of his Vietnam dilemma, he still believes there must be a quid pro quo in any bargain. Even without military advisers warning against a lull in U. S. bombing, Johnson isn't a man to make concessions without at least a promise of a definite return. Another big question is whether the New York Times report of Premier Pham Van Dong's statements was an accurate reflection of his views. The dispatch was subject to Hanoi censorship and misunderstandings in translation. In addition, we often have had disappointing experiences with communists over the real meaning of words. There also is the question of the Viet Cong. Intelligence reports say they now have 280,000 men under arms in South Vietnam, an increase of 50,000 in the past year. They have been battered in battle but definitely have not been destroyed. They still control one-third or more of the countryside. And they still insist there can be no peace in Vietnam unless they are given full control — which is one reason Premier Ky is adamant against dealing with them. Ky and his military government have no interest in surrendering their power to their enemies — at the very least they would have to run for their lives. On the plus side, of course, is the obvious fact that Russia would welcome peace in Vietnam if it can be achieved without the communists losing face. And Red China is so involved in her own internal power struggle that she is believed less likely than ever to interfere DREW PEARSON strongly if Hanoi decides it's had enough. - o- —GLASS HOUSE DWELLERS— Rep. Adam Clayton Powell, the flamboyant Harlem Democrat, has done more than his share of globe trotting, payroll manipulating and back-door wheeling and dealing. But the records of some of his colleagues who are casting stones back up his claim he is not the only sinner in Congress. Rep. Gibbons of Florida, who helped start the fuss over Powell, is associated with a law firm back in Tampa which represents phosphate companies. Gibbons used his influence as a Congressman to oppose a federal subsidy that would have brought cheaper electrical power to competing phosphate companies in Idaho. Rep. Burleson of Texas, whose House Administration Committee investigated Powell, once collected expense money from his committee for "official business" while he celebrated Thanksgiving and Christmas at his Texas home. As for global gallivanting, almost one-third of Congress has returned recently from foreign vacations at the taxpayers' expense. Most of them took their wives along. Rep. Passman of Louisiana, a severe critic of federal spending, traveled around the world spending the taxpayer's money wherever he went. Rep. Wilson of California also circled the globe, stopping at tourist spots from Lisbon to Athens, Beirut to Bangkok. He apparently feels no obligation to explain his trip to the public, though it was financed by the public. He refused to answer any questions about it. Rep. Flood of Pennsylvania just completed a 25-day trip to Sunny South America, as has become his custom every winter. Rep. Byrne - of Pennsylvania toured Germany, Spain and Italy as the Army's guest. He insists that the trip was "all work and no pleasure." Other Congressmen, too numerous to single out, took group trips to far reaches of the globe. Dozens stopped in Paris, though President de Gaulle, by ousting NATO, has removed their main excuse for visiting the glamorous French capital. - o- -NO SPY DEAL WITH RUSSIA-Hints have been dropped secretly that Buel Wartham the Little Rock tourist sentenced to three years in a Soviet labor camp for stealing a cast-iron bear from a Leningrad hotel and buying rubles on the black market, could have his sentence suspended in return for the release of Soviet spy Igor Ivanov from an American prison. U. S. officials say however, that this would simply encourage Russia to jail any American on some frivolous charge every time they wanted to make an exchange for a convicted spy. As a result, Washington has shown not the slightest interest in making a trade. - o - — FEDERAL AID FOULUPS — The Senate Subcommittee on Intergovernmental Relations, headed by Sen. Muskie of Maine, has been bombarded with complaints from local communities over federal aid foulups. Local authorities protest that they have become entangled in red tape whenever they have applied for the water and sewer facilities that Congress has authorized. Four government departments — Agriculture, Commerce, Interior and Urban Development— have authority over these projects. Most applicants are totally confused over where and how to apply. The correct place depends upon the nature of the project and the size of the community. In some cases, federal funds have been lost because the communities filed the wrong forms. They thought the inquiry forms were application forms. The filing time expired before the communities discovered their mistake. Some cities have established full-time offices merely to study the available federal grants and to process the applications. Ottosen Group Making Quilt For Society OTTOSEN - A quilt is being made for the Humboldt County Historical Society by the Ottosen group. The design is the rail fence. Various colored prints are used with plain green, the latter color making the design. This will make the quilt top. Twenty-five cent donations are being received to put names on the back of the quilt. This also entitles a person to a number on the quilt. More than one number is permissible, but the name will only appear once. The drawing will be held at the Humboldt County Historical meeting in March. An all-day meeting was held Thursday at the home of Mrs. Essie Cooper. Quilt pieces were cut and sewed. Those who came to the Cooper home to help were Naomi Struthers, Mrs. W. G. Cooper, Mrs. Roy Telford, Mrs. Donald Usher and Mrs. Albert Thorsen. - o - Presbyterian church members had a communion service Sunday, .with Rev. Ralph Hindman in charge. They had a pot-luck dinner at noon, followed by the yearly business meeting. Keith Strayer, lay pastor, gave a report. Others giving reports were Naomi Struthers, Laurence Telford, Ralph Richards, Mrs. Essie Cooper, and Mrs. Albert Thorsen. Election results were as follows: Elder, Mrs. Mike Frohling; trustees, Roy Telford, Laurence Telford, Mike Frohling and Larry Telford; treasurer, Laurence Telford, re-elected; ushers, Laurence Telford and Dean Telford; pianist, Mrs. Earl Long and Mrs. Essie Cooper. Ralph Richards was re-elected Sunday School superintendent, as were his assistants, Naomi Struthers and Mrs. Albert Thorsen. - o- Arthur Zeman took lis senior class of 15 youngsters from the Methodist church at Bradgate to the show at Humboldt and out for lunch Thursday night. Mr. and Mrs. Ed Kemna entertained at a card party Tuesday night. Raymond Wehrspann had high score for men and Clarence Bauer low. Mrs. Eugene Hoflus had high score for women and Mrs. Oliver Lee low. Raymond Wehrspann had travel. Friday night visitors at the Fahey Gress home were Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Mogler and family and Mr. and Mrs. Enrln Mogler and family of West Bend. They celebrated Connie Mogler*s llth birthday and also Mrs. Ervin Mogler's birthday. Mr. and Mrs. Matt Kallestad of Marshalltown were Thursday afternoon visitors at the Carroll Olsons. REPORT OF CONDITION OF "BURT SAVINGS BANK" of Hurt in the State of Iowa at the close of business on December 31, 1966. ASSETS 1. Cash, balances with other banks, and cash items in process of collection $ 128,070.75 2. United States Government obligations, direct and guaranteed — 812,446.76 3. Obligations of States and political subdivisions 10,000.00 • 7. Other loans and discounts 745,838.56 8. Bank premises, furniture and fixtures, and other assets representing bank premises 1.226.00 11. Other assets 125.35 12. TOTAL ASSETS $1.697.707.42 LIABILITIES 13. Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations 826,341.05 14. Time and savings deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations 565,185.69 15. Deposits of United States Government 6,005.19 16. Deposits of States and political subdivisions 133.556.08 19. Certified and officers' checks, etc 1,066.69 20. TOTAL DEPOSITS $1.332.154.70 (a) Total demand deposits $ 936,969.01 (b) Total time and savings deposits $ 595,185.69 24. Other liabilities (including $ None mortgages and other liens on bank premises and other real estate) 6,113.92 25. TOTAL LIABILITIES .$1,538.268.62 CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 26. (c) Common stock—total par value 50.000.00 27. Surplus 50.000.00 28. Undivided profits 59.438.80 30. TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 159.43830 31. TOTAL LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL ACCOUNTS $1.697.707.42 MEMORANDA 1. Average of total deposits for the 15 calendar days ending with call date $1,550505.02 2. Average of total loans for the 15 calendar days ending with call date 789.866.26 3. Loans as shown in item 7 of "Assets" are after deduction of valuation reserves of . 3,036.67 We H. E. Rachut, President and G. H. McMullen, Vice President and Cashier, of the above-named bank do solemnly swear that this report of condition is true and correct, to the best of our knowledge and belief. H. E. Rachut. President G. H. McMullen, Vice-Pres. & Cashier Correct—Attest: L. E. Linnan Donald W. Patterson) R. I. Mawdsley Kirby J. Smith ) Directors. State of Iowa, County of Kossuth. ss: Sworn to and subscribed before me this llth day of January, 1967. and I hereby certify that I am not an officer or director of this bank. My- commission expires July 4th, 1969. Beulah Dundas, Notary Public REPORT OF CONDITION OF EXCHANGE STATE BANK of Wesley in the State of Iowa at the close of business on December 31, 1966. ASSETS 1. Cash, balances with other banks, and cash items in process of collection $ 166,432.30 2. United States Government obligations direct and guaranteed — 344,667.36 3. Obligations of States and political subdivisions 91,690.35 7.Other loans and discounts 1,037,262.31 8. Bank premises, furniture and fixtures, and other assets representing bank premises 11,306.28 11. Other assets 36,429.04 12. TOTAL ASSETS w .$1.687,787.64 LIABILITIES 13. Demand deposits of Individuals, partnerships. and corporations 930.218.89 14. Time and savings deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations . 493,287.02 15. Deposits of United States Government 20.175.42 16. Deposits of States and political subdivisions 62.097.29 19. Certified and officers' checks etc. . 4,916.73 20. TOTAL DEPOSITS $1.510,695.35 (a) Total demand deposits $ 989,908.33 (b) Total time and savings deposits $ 520,787.02 24. Other liabilities (including $ None mortgages and other Hens on bank premises and other real estate) 360.00 25. TOTAL LIABILITIES $1,511.055.35 CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 26. (c) Common stock—total par value 30,000.00 No. shares authorized 300 No. shares outstanding 300 27. Surplus 120000.00 28. Undivided profits I 111111111'™™""™"™"! 26,73259 30. TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS . 176,73259 31. TOTAL LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL ACCOUNTS ,$1.687.787.64 MEMORANDA 1. Average of total deposits for the 15 calendar days ending with call date .$1,584,281.88 2. Average of total loans for the 15 calendar days ending with call date „ 1.042.256.81 3. Loans as shown in item 7 of "Assets" are after deduction of valuation reserves of 16,338.05 We L. H. Klein, President and D. L. Klein. Cashier of the above- named bank do solemnly swear that this report of condition is true and correct, to the best of our knowledge and belief. L. H. Klein, President D. L. Klein, Cashier Correct—Attest: J. W. Goetz Lael T. Root ) L. H. Klein Ben G. Studer ) Directors. D. L. Klein Herman Bode ) State of Iowa, County of Kossuth, as: Sworn to and subscribed before me this 10th day of January, 1967, and I hereby certify that I am not an officer or director of this bank. My commission expires July 4, 1969. V. W. Wenger, Notary Public

Get full access with a Free Trial

Start Free Trial

What members have found on this page