Kossuth County Advance from Algona, Iowa on May 31, 1965 · Page 6
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Kossuth County Advance from Algona, Iowa · Page 6

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Algona, Iowa
Issue Date:
Monday, May 31, 1965
Page:
Page 6
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(Iowa) ABVANCe M6NDAY, MAY 31, 196* "INK in my VEINS" By MARIAN INMAN i i .H»H~H-H-.i..i.. i And what is so rare as a day in .Tune? Then, if ever, tome perfect days; Then Heaven tries earth if it be in 'tune, And over it softly her warm ear lays. . .Tames Russell Lowell Time goes so quickly and when you read this It will be a first of June day and I hope Its the kind of day Lowell describes in his lovely poem, Graduations will be over and weddings an occasion of the day. Countless young people starting out on (he road of life with the feeling that the world is their oyster and so it is. While the same things will be done again by'these young people they will be while not new be different with a special touch given by e;ich individual. They hftve so much nbilitv that any one of them could reach a position of greatness if he develops all of the abilities God has given him. No one knows, no one can b« sure, what great talent lies among these youth starting out on the path of life. Among them will be some of the truly great business, industrial, agricultural, professional or political leaders of tomorrow. It is up to them now as parents and church and school have done what they could for them. We can hope that we did the job well and that we have given them the inspiration to 4 face life with courage and thus be able to meet whatever conditions may befall them. If we have done this we have given them the greatest gift of all. At the Greenwood Girls 4-H Club tea for Mothers and former leaders we played, 'What's My Line.' One of the characters to be guessed was the future first woman president of the United States: Later in the game one-of"the"girls" portraying a man, said he did no work, rendered no service, and he turned out to be the husband of the future first woman president. It was fun at the time and we all laughed, but all agreed that the future first lady of our land would be the kind of woman president who had a husband who did work and who did render a service to his family and to his country. In the 1964 presidential election, twenty-one women were candidates for the House of Representatives; nine were re-elected, one newly elected. The latter is Mrs. Patsy Mink who will represent Hawaii. Mrs. Mink, a 36-year old lawyer, of Japanese parentage, wat the first woman to be admitted to the Bar in Hawaii. She has had a long standing interest in politics and has served in both Houses of the Hawaiian Legislature. An interesting aspect of the pre-election nominating contests was the candidacy.of Senator Margaret Chase Smith of the State of Maine, who sought the presidential nomination of the Republican party. Although Mrs. Smith invested a minimum of time and money in developing an intensive campaign, this was the first time a really qualified woman with the necessary political experience has announced herself for the highest office in the land. > : It is estimated that about,half of all the votes cast in the national election were cast by women. Since 1917, the year in which' Miss Jeannette Rankin of Montana, a Republican, won a seat in the United States House of Representatives, seventy women have ^occuDied posts in the National Congress.'They have come/ifrom»34: of the 50 states of the Union and have" included Iawyers7' judges, artists, writers, nurses,:and homemakers. The Executive Offices of the President of the United States announced in July. 1964 that since January of the same year more than 265 women have received top level appointments in the Federal Government, and 818 women have been promoted to jobs paying salaries in excess of $10,000. This bears out the intent of President Johnson stated at the beginning of his Administration to place at least 50 qualified women in the highest eschelons of the national government and to open full opportunities for advancement of women in the Civil Service. Early in 1963 the United States Congress passed an Equal Pay Bill which 'assures large numbers of women Sexton girl is married GLENNDA SUE OABRIELSON, Sexton, and Walter Garland Murphy, New Hampton, were married at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, May 1, in St. Patrick's church in Cedar Falls -The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Glenn E Gabrielson of Sexton, and the groom is,the son of Mr. and 'Mrs. Gerald T Murphy, New Hampton. .They are living at 315'/ 2 Main Street' Cedar Falls, where both attend the State College. ' equal pay for work of equal value. On June 10, 1963, the late President John F. Kennedy signed the bill into law: The new law requires employers to pay women a salary equal to that of men when both are working under the same conditions with the tame responsibilities. The law ** ve * •??!'•» only to women working in placet env ployed in inter-state commerce or in placet that benefit from contract! with the Federal Government. Alto ex- eluded are women whose employment is not covered by the Minimum Wage Act. Twenty-four States of the Union have enacted Equal Pay legislation. Mitt Margaret Hickey, a well-known magazine editor, was appointed the Chief Executive to head the Citizen's Advisory Council on the Status of Women. Thlt Council was formed at a retult of the finding! of President Kennedy's Cpmmjition on the fjtus of Women. When the President's Commission disbanded in November 1963 after presenting its final report, provision wat made to tet up two permanent bodiet, one governmental and one non-governmental, to act upon the recommendations of the Commission. • Miss Hickey is Chairman of the non-governmental committee, which is composed of the Cabinet officers' of each department of the United States Government. l Yetj.jtbme day we will have a first lady President? IfcwUMUnited States. .': Marjorie Tobin at Swea City Swea City ••— Marjorie Lee Tobin was named valedictorian of the 1965 graduating class of Swea City high school. Marjorie ••.VA».V 1 .«b%S%%%%S%SSV.S%%%-i.S%%Vy%SV.V.«,VV»A«l Fun time is... HONDA TIME had a grade average of 3.77 completing 44 credits she graduated with 30 A's and 14 B's for the four years. •:'. SplntatoriPn was Catharine Feddersen with a grade average of 3,66 she had 39 credits having 27 A's, 11 B's and 1 C for the four years. Marjorie is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Tobin. She received 11 credits more than the required 33 for graduating from Swea City, This is increaS; ing each year until a requirement of 36 credits are needed to graduate. She has been active' in voonl music also. $•'• Cathy is the dauehter of Mr. and Mrs. Chris Fedderson, f Othor awards presented went to Rf>id Farland, senior, who contributed the most to athletics; Bonnie O'Green for most to music; and Paul Danielson .received . the Bar f Association award for ; citizenship. These awards are voted on by the senior class each year. ** Swisher resigns at Twin Rivers . 15 MODELS TO CHOOSE FROM... As low as $251°° or $10 per month SEE North Iowa Appliance Center ALOQNA John Levy or Doyle Dailey 5-3318 Swish»r, head basketball, tnok »nd so f th>ll co->eh at Twin Rivnrs high school for the nast four years. has resigned his coaching and teaching positions he announced Thursday. Swisher will move to West Branch at the start of the fall term and will coach girls basketball, boys baseball and will teach nhysical education. Swisher took the Twin Rivers firls to the state tournament three years in a row, the final trip last season. He had a 79-?l record at Twin Rivers and started the girls track program. MUSHROOM — An eight stemmed mushroom was found rec«ntlv by Everett Brockway Qf Mediapolis. Where? He's not telling. MUSCULAR AGNES • PAINS Take PRUYO tablets when you want temporary relief frpro minor aches and pains and hody stiffness often associated with Arthritis, Rheumatism, Bursitis, Lumbago, Backache and Painful Muscular aches. Lose these Jis- comforts or your money At all drug counters. HQNS68UCH DRUG low* Guaranteed Farm FRESH CLEAN ft PRODUCED LOCALLY UNDER C0NTROLLED ENVIRONMENT :;'s . -....I TROUTMAN EGG FACTORY Shown above is the modern Troutman Egg Factory located two miles west ana one-half mile north of Algona. Owned and operated by Mr. and Mrs. Harley Troutman, Sr. Factory space it 40V x 156' plus office and cooler. Having 6,000 hens on vitamin fortified cage layer rations. Controlled lighting and'temperature are only tome features of this mod- •rn ann fartnru • . ..,'•" i-•.•-'• * * • ... " -.-'••••.•••,;•'.'• ern egg factory. THESE LOCAL FOOD STORES & R & SERVE RANTS EGGS AL60NA HOTEL COFFEE SHOP :'V.. : ' > ' i 1 •'•',•:: ..'.'»•• CHARLIE'S SUPPER CLUB CHROME CAFE VAN'S CAFE NAIDRITECAFE • FAREWAY STORE • HOOD'S SUPERVALU • NATIONAL FOOD STORE • RONS JACK'S • DliOONAL GROCERY • EAST END GROCERY • OOOD SAMARITAN REST HOME M • BLUE ft WHITE CAFE • LOVSTAD'S MARKET ft VOQEL'S STORE - BURT If your favorite food store or restaurant does not have these Quality- Controlled Farm - Fresh Eggs see the muager or cill 295-5793, AlgoM. TROUTMAN EGG FACTORY Vi MILE NORTH OF NWY. II AT NOIARTON CORNER WS-5793 ALQONA

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