Fayette County Leader from Fayette, Iowa on April 12, 1962 · Page 7
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April 12, 1962

Fayette County Leader from Fayette, Iowa · Page 7

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Fayette, Iowa
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Thursday, April 12, 1962
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Page 7
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Whose Farm Is The Mystery Farm? 23,728 loans made; 44 • | 8!SSS[MHM^HHBBRMBMBGBMBHHHIRlI!illSP!ffliSR?'??T'^^ ..„..._.***:'" ' ' To Fayeffe counfy farmers ^ Do You Recall -40 A -TV Free copy of mystery Farm picture to owner For making identification 20 Years Ago — Friends of Mr. and Mrs. William T. Diamond, the former Fayette County Club Agent the past five years, will meet at the U. I. U. gymnasium Monday evening, March 30, for a farewell party and program. Eight northeast Iowa 4-H basketball teams will meet at the U. I. U. gymnasium Saturday, March 28, for the third district tournament ___ sponsored by the campus 4-H club ... . " of U. I. U. 40 Years A S° — The picture above was taken of a farm somewhere in Fayette county, in the vicinity of the town of Fayette. The mystery Claude W. Voshell, Wadena, to f ar m pictures are n series spons- Mary Irene Lonergan, Wadena; ored by the Fayc te Leader ter Neil L. Fox, Westgate, to Esther the interest of its many readern. M. Specht, Sumner; C. N. Hart, If the owner of the farm pic- Postville, to Olive May Rawson, tuied above will stop in at the Fayette; Roy J. Mains, Fairbault, Leader office he will receive free Minn., to Dorothy L. Brandenberg, of charge a 5 x 7 glossy print of Arlington; D. A. Howard, Oelwein, the picture. There is nothing to to Mildred P. Guritz, Maynard; buy. All that is asked of the own- Oliver Wendell Troupe, Oelwein, or is a little information so that to Gertrude Marie Learned, Oel- the farm picture may be identi- wein. fied for the public the following. Farmers built a record ll'.\ million bushels of additional on the farm storage under tJic farm storage facility loan program during 1961, the Department of Agriculture has reported. This figure represents a total of 23,728 loans m;idi- for $35.068,920. A major factor in this record activity was a lowering of down payment provisions in March I'.Hil, as directed by the President, to encourage storage of grain and other price support commodities on farms and to strengthen economic activity in farming areas. Ellis W. Thompson, chairman. Agricultural Stabilization and Con scrvation county committee, points out that fanners in the county took out 44 loains totaling STj'.MKW.S) under the 1961 farm storage facility loan program, to build storage totaling 195,338 bushels. For the nation, the 129 million bushels of capacity built on farms under the loan program in 1%1 more than doubled the (ii).(j million bushels built in 1940. It was also considerably higher than the pro vious record year of 1!)59, when farmers built 86.7 million bushels of farm storage capacity under the p.og:-am. The stepped up activity resulted in use of an estimated 45,000 tons of rolled shei t in bins and other storage structures acquired by farmers in 1!!J1 through loans under the program. About 70 per cent of the farm structures built are made of steel and the remaining 30 per cent of other materials, chiefly wood. Under the facility loan program, farmers may obtain loans from the Commodity credit Corporation to finance the cost of needed new farm storage structures. The new down payment provisions enabled farmers to borrow up to !). r > per cent of the outlay for farm storage facilities costing 40 cents or less per bushel to build. Oon facilities costing more than •111 cents per bushel, the producer may borrow up to 95 per cent of 40 cents times the bushel capacity of the structure, or 80 per cent of the actual cost, whichever is higher. No loans are available for more than an amount equal to 50 cents times the bushel capacity of the facility. The loans run for not more than five years from the date the loan is disbursed. Loans may be repaid in not more than four annual installments, with the first installment due on the first anniversary of the loan. Interest is charged at the rate of four per cent per annum on the unpaid balance. Since the program began in 1949, and through December 1961, farmers had borrowed a total of approximately $182.4 million, to add some CG9 million bushels of grain storage capacity on the nation's farms. Of the total amount loaned, the balance outstanding at the end of 19C1 was about $63.6 million. ammonia, on the other hand, contain 100 per cent free ammonia. This free ammonia will escape to the atmosphere if surface applied. The same is true for part of the ammonia contained in the 37 to 41 per cent ( low pressure ) nitrogen solutions. To be effective, aqua ammonia, anhydrous ammonia and the low-pressure nitrogen solutions must be injected into the soil and applied at times when a good soil seal can be obtained. The relative cost of aqua ammonia and other nitrogen sources must be figured on a local basis. In some areas where fertilizer manufacures are making aqua primarily for use in producing liquid mixed fertilizers it may be a relatively cheap source. Marine corps offers Program to seniors The Marine Corps' annual high school graduates program goes into effect this week according to an announcement by local area Mar- ine recruiting stations. Seniors graduating this summer are offered the "Cod 'J' Program". They may enlist prior to graduation and depart for active duty following completion of school, or up to 120 days after enlistment. Time spent at home and school before departure counts toward better pay and promotion opportunities, and mi'itn' - y obligations. Qualified graduates arc also offered three year enlistments in lieu of the required four. Interested high school seniors are invited to visit local Marine recruiting stations for information on these and other programs available to young men and women entering the military today. The rewriting station for this area is located at the Post Office Building in Waterloo. Retires Louis lUiss of Ryan has retired a'tiT 44 yea.'s as rural mail carrier out of Ityan. lie has covered approximately 707.400 miles in that time. Aqua - ammonia source Oi nitrogen fertilizer week. Thomas Rogers Parker, son of Thornton and Christina Parker, was born Sept. 16, 1850, in Tiffin, Ohio, and died at his home near Lima, Iowa, March 23, 1942, at the ripe age of 91 and one half. The state and county have raised tax valuations of property in the town of Fayette, $100,000. Frank Jones died Monday afternoon at his home, of a heart attack. Funeral services were held at the Lima church, conducted by the 'Rev. G. W. Ukena of West Union. Fayette county educational cooperators in the Extension Food for Freedom program has reported holding 70 neighborhood meetings with a total attendance of over 750, County Agent Paul E. McElroy reported today. Sunday, March 22, marked the 80th milestone in William Prayer's life, and at his home on south Main street many relatives and friends called during the day. Gifts, cards, telephone messages, and flowers were received, besides two birthday cakes, one baked by Mrs. R. C. DeBow and the other by Mable Knight. —•— 30 Years Ago — Mrs, P. H. Hastings was laid to rest after she passed away Sunday at an advanced age, having lived in the same vicinity many years. Beginning Sunday evening came a heavy fall of snow which continued all night and a part of Monday morning. There was some wind, and roads were reported badly drifted and impassable in some places. Applications- for marriage licenses: Milton C. Pieper, Hawkeye, to Dora Ann Walker, Donnan;. Mrs. Lamira Vought passed away at the home of her granddaughter, Mrs. R. B. McCormack, last Saturday, March 18, at the age of 99 years seven months and two days. Although Iowa women voted in the general election two years ago the women of the state have never yet participated in a state wide primary. The primary to be held June 5, in which all parties join, will therefore be the first time in Iowa history that the woman will have a part in naming party candidates. The neighbors of Sam Cell and patrons of the milk route which he has handled for the past 10 years, are this week showing in a substantial manner their appreciation for his good services. Mr. Cell's house was destroyed by fire about a week ago, and this week these kind.friends are assisting to repair the damage by hauling the material for a new house which will be built at once on the sight of the one just destroyed. Worthy Winners meet The regular meeting of the Westfield Worthy Winners was held Saturday, March 17, at the Farm Bureau building in Fayette. Many interesting pictures were shown fof roll call which was "My Favorite Picture and the Painter". Janeen Dilley gave a demonstration on "Painting a Simple Object". "Sand and Seal" was a team demonstration given by Janice Stoneman and Marsha Frey. Hostesses were Louise Pickett and Linda Lamphier. The next meeting will be April 4, with Janeen and Geri Lynn DUk'y as hostesses. Reservations being Taken for park cabins Reservations for state park cabins a-e now being taken by park conservation officers, the State Conservation commission said today. Most of the cabins will go into service May 15 and are of two types; modern and overnight. Overnight cabins are $30 per week or $5 per night, and the modern cabins a.-e $35 per week or $6 per night. These are all family cabins and will accomodate four persons comfortably. Reservations for ona and two-week vacations should be made a month in advance, but reservations arc not required for overnight stays if there are any vacant cabins. Special rates apply on the stone cabins at Palisades- Kepler state park near Mt. Vernon. The parks with cabins are: Backbone at Strawberry Point with 18 cabins; Lake Wanello at Drakesville with 12 cabins; Springbrook at Guthrie Center with six cabins; Lake Of Three Fires at Bedford with six cabins; Lacey- Keosauqua at Keosauqua with six cabins; Pine Lake at Eldora with four cabins. Information about parks and their facilities and the addresses of the various park officers may be obtained by writing State Conservation commission, East 7th and Court, Des Moincs 8, Iowa. Farmers in Fayette county will begin to hear more about aqua- ammonia as a source of nitrogen fertilizer from now on, says County Extension Director M. C. Wangsness. Already the questions are being asked: "What is aqua ammonia?" "What are its advantages and disadvantages?" Under Iowa conditions, aqua-ammonia and all other nitrogen sources are equally effective per pound of nitrogen - provided each is properly applied. The choice on which to use comes down to considerations of ease of application and cost per pound of nitrogen, applied to the land. Aqua-ammonia is made by reacting anhydrous ammonia ( 82 per cent nitrogen ) with water. In the process, the ammonia is converted to a low-pressure source of nitrogen. Thus, aqua is easier and somewhat safer to handle. But, reacting the anhydrous with water reduces the nitrogen content from 82 per cent to 24 per cent. About four times as much material must be handled to apply a given poundage of nitrogen. Another disadvantage of aqua- ammonia is that it must be injected into the soil - just as its parent anhydrous ammonia. This means it can't be used as top dressing to an established grass stands or as a surface application on crop residues to be plowed down in the fall. Surface applications of liquid nitrogen must be limited to the 28 to 32 per cent urea- ammonium nitrate solutions. Mr. Wangsness stated these urea- ammonium nitrate solutions are quite different from aqua- ammonia since their nitrogen exists as snlts in solution. These salts will not be lost when the water evaporates. Aqua ammonia and anhydrous Plant Mrs. Amelia Klink of Oelwein has a tomato plant growing inside the home that has a two inch in diameter tomato ripening on its branches. Roper Special 30" GAS RANGE GIANT SIZE OVEN SIMMER - SPEED BURNERS NEW LO - TEMP OVEN NOTICE TO DOG OWNERS DUE TO NUMEROUS COMPLAINTS BY LOCAL CITIZENS, VtfHO ARE PREPARING GARDENS, WE ARE GOING TO ENFORCE THE DOG ORDINANCE THIS SPRING. Dogs Must Be Tied AND (CONFINED TO THE OWNER'S PREMISES FOR A PERIOD OF THE NEXT 90 DAYS. JACK BECK Mayor ALL DOGS RUNNING LOOSE WILL BE CONSIDERED A STRAY AND WILL BE PICKED UP. PLEASE COOPERATE. LLOYD HOLTZMAN Chief Of Police KEEP-WARM OVEN SYSTEM—Thaws frozen foods quickly; keeps meat hot and juicy lor hours without further cooking; warms plates, bread, rolls and leftovers, top. Set as low at 140 degrees. BLACK CAT SPECIALS • $178 —9 P.M. PRICE • $168 — 10 P. M. PRICE • $158—IIP. M. PRICE • $148 — MIDNIGHT! FRIDAY — APRIL 13th PEOPLES Natural Gas CLIFFORD HAYES — Manager Phone 266 — Fayette, Iowa CHILLED APPLE RICE FOAM Now here's a folksy, friendly rice dessert that anyone can make with a mere smidgin of effort. Yet it packs a wonderful lot of goodies . . . canned apple sauce for the surprise tang of apple, coconut, maraschino cherries and almonds. And it has whipped cream frothed through it. So pretty and tempting is it, you might almost decide to reserve it as a guest-time dessert. But how about the members of the family? Serving it to them is one way to send them from the table in a sunny frame of mind. So better just acknowledge that here's an all round winner and proceed accordingly. 1 cup uncooked rice 1 teaspoon salt 3 cups apple juice % cup sugar 2 cups canned apple sauce J /2 cup sliced maraschino cherries 1 cup flaked coconut 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 teaspoon almond extract 1 cup heavy cream, whipped Vi cup toasted slivered • almonds Cook rice and salt according to directions on package using apple juice in place of water. Add sugar; cool slightly. Add apple sauce, maraschino cherries, coconut, vanilla and almond extracts; mix well. Chill; just before serving fold in whipped cream and spoon into sherbet glasses or dessert dishes. Garuisu with almonds. Makes B-10 servings. • ORDER NOW Fayette Leader

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