Mt. Vernon Register-News from Mt Vernon, Illinois on December 6, 1963 · Page 10
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December 6, 1963

Mt. Vernon Register-News from Mt Vernon, Illinois · Page 10

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Friday, December 6, 1963
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10 THE REGISTER-NEWS — MT. VERNON, ILLINOIS St a u bach, Sidle And Lotthridge AP Names 3 QBs For All-America Honors By BOB HOOBCSG I Associated Press Sports Writer: NEW YORK (AP) - Throe quarterbacks including miraculous Midshipman Roger Staubach, a gritty little man, and a part-rime teacher join returnee Damon Bame on the 1963 Asso- >. B v CHARLES CHAMBERLAIN' dated Press All-America foot- j A ' vsociale( j Prcss S m.rts Writer ball team. ' Staubach won HIGH PRAISE BUT NO JOB OFFER Notre Dame Likes Devore But Maybe Not As Coach Bowling the Heisman Trophy as the College Player of the Year. With Saturday's game against Army remaining, he has accounted for 1,738 yards passing and running. This was the year of the quarterback. Jimmy Sidle, who guided once-beaten Auburn to an Orange Bowl trip, and Billy Lothridge. Georgia Tech's "Do it Yourself' 'exponent, were the SWEET SIXTEEN- MIXED SOUTH BEND. ind. fAP) -| LEAGUE "I'm in your corner all the way,: High Games — Elmer Rainey Huglrie." ! 20S;' Bud Herbert 2M-200; Walt "I'm for you. Hughie." Thrasher 203; Mattie Filberth "You're the best, Hughic." j 200; Shirley Hertenstein 192; They all patted 52-yoar-old I Jackie Thrasher 177. Hugh Devore on the back and j nigh Series — Elmer Rainey said nice things at Notre Dame's; 551: Burl Herbert 527; Glen Fil- footbal banquet Thursday night, j berth 519: Mattie Filberth 492; But nobody told Hughie that 1 Shirley Hertenstein 491; Betty he would be back next year as: McDonald 472. head coach. i STANDINGS This sincerely warm, tlior- j W L other field generals"'picked oni ou 6 hl y Notre Damc tadoctri-i The Con;- 28 14 the recommendations of eight | nated ma » has ,nt ' mosr PR- 1 Strikes and Spares 26 16 regional boards. The sports- 1 cuhar status ever to cloak a: Dry Holers 21 21 writers and broadcasters took into account all games through Nov. 30. Sherman Lewis, a 154 - pound Michigan State Springer, completes the backfield. A line averaging 225 pounds features Dame, rated a better guard than a year ago when he spurred Southern California's national champions. End Dave Parks of Texas Tech, first man picked in the National Football League draft, is paired with Bob Lacey of North Carolina. Scott Applet on, a 235 - pounder who has been practicing teaching at an Austin elementary school, blocked and tackled Texas to its first perfect season in 25 years. At the other tackle is Minnesota's Carl Eller. who stood out for an unspectacular team. ' Guard Bob Brown, "the Big Daddy" of Nebraska's first non- ference champions in 23 years, and fiery center - linebacker S ick Butkus of Rose Bowl-bound linois complete the squad. Staubach, Sidle and Butkus Bre juniors, the rest seniors Staubach is just plain hard to believe. Against Michigan, for example, he completed 14 of 16 passes for 237 yards and two touchdowns, then ran 70 more. He accounted for 235 yards in Navy's only loss, the wild 32-28 setback to Southern Methodist, and on the final play was passing for an apparent winning score when a defender batted the ball away from the receiver in the end zone. Basing the selections on all- around excellence rather than on a quarterback, fullback and two halfbacks, the team also includes Sidle and Lothridge. The Soutneastern Regional Board rated Sidle slightly ahead of Lothridge and 1962 All-America George Mira, in that order, at the. signal calling job. Mira, who had a better passing record this year with less help, is in the second team backfield with Baylor's Don Trull, Duke's Jay Wilkinson and Gale Sayers Of Kansas. Although a marked man who Sometimes crashed into linemen }00 pounds heavier, Lewis never missed a game in three varsity seasons and always was a threat to break open a contest at any moment. : He turned in five runs of over 80 yards this season. Parks was grabbed by the San Francisco 49'ers in the NFL draft and may be used as a defensive back. North Carolina wouldn't give Lacey a football scholarship at the outset until he earned it, which took almost no time at all. Appleton, a middle guard on defense and weak side tackle in Texas's flip-flop offense, is a big reason the Longhorns have lost only twice since he became a varsity head knocker. Eller capped a brilliant season in the 13-0 grudge victory over Wisconsin during which he led a great goal line stand at the one. deflected a pass to a teammate for an interception, caught a tackle eligible pass and generally made life miserable for Badger quarterbacks. Brown is the team's big man at 269 pounds. He wears out a pair o( six 14 ',2 -E shoes per game and caves in a helmet almost as often. major collegiate football coach, i Hi Lo's Devore, captain of the 1934 1 The Foursome .... Irish team, and a staunch (lis-; Boonclockers ciple of the fabled Knute Rockne j Inconsistent was called in from his .Notre j Lucky Strikers 20 22 20 22 20 22 19 23 14 28 ROCKKTTES LEAGUE High Games Mabel Fulford High Series — Mabel Fulford 161-162; Mildred Parr 158; Emma Hill 151; Lorene Prosuker 145; Merlene Huston 145; LaVernc Arnold 145. 482: Emma Hill 423; Merlene Huston 394; Mildred Pan- 388; Anita Huston 378; Ixirene Pro­ suker 378; La Verne Arnold 378. STANDINGS W I. Fulford Cons 27»-i W/z Pegs Beauty Shop 27 15 Hawkin's Pastry 23 19 Maid Rite 22 Misfits 20Va J. II. Lewis 17 John Bean Fire App. 16 Roaring 20's 15 Hughie Devore Dame freshman coaching chores PYRAMID LEAGUE High Games—Pat Higgins 194; Joann Johnson 181; Nancy Farthing 173: Joyce Somers 168; Shirley Yeargin 164; Barbara Dare 164. High Series—Jeanette Cox 462; Pat Higgins 461; Joann Johnson 449; Jean Ann Davison 445; Nancy Farthing 443; Elinor Carter 441. STANDINGS W I. Gaunt's T. V 28 14 Motel State 26 16 - 24 18 ... 22 20 ... 21 21 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1963 BROWNS FACT- TOUGH LIONS IN NFL GAME Stan Tire Service Ti'i-County Electric . . „; Capps & Warren last spring to become 'interim , First National Bank head mentor, replacing Joe Ku-|j oe Martin Ins. harich. , Prescription Shop I said then, and I'll say now. ' that I'll do whatever Notre Dame feels is best for me," says Devore, whose team won only two out of nine games this season. "I have had no indication that T will remain as head coach. I have no indication that f will' 632; not. I know no more about Notre! 5S1; 17 25 17 25 13 29 COMMERCIAL LEAGUE High Games—-W. J. Pearson 230; P. Heiderschiet 226; D. Shafer 223; R. Smith 222: L. Casti- ldi 214; N. Cowan 214; H. Stranski 212. High Series — P. Heiderscheit ,. Castildi 597: D. Shafer I. Stranski 562; G. Bean Dame's coaching plans than I i 546; W. Pearson 536. did when I took over the team] STANDINGS last spring." Nearly 1,000 persons turned out at the 44th annual banquet. They gave Hughie a standing ovation. Security Bank .... Lawrence Lounge Lions Club W. G. Motors .... They rocked the rafters in a! Team No. 8 cheer for him, lead by Bob Lehmann, outgoing teani captain. They heard the 1964 captain- elect, Jim Carroll of Atlanta, Ga.. say: W 45 38 32 31 29* s Alexander Wholesale 29 Farm Bureau 27'4 1st National Bank 24 Silver Streak 23 K. of C 22 i T. B. Sanitorium 22 G. Employees . 17 "We didn't make a showing j W that Hugh Devore deserved as aj p , v S p, NNBRS jj, lAGVf: coach, bu watch us next year. : mGH c;AMES . BilHe Sue They heard guest speaker i w „ , 69 Billie Bake , 163 . Duffy Daugherty, Michigan, ul)ie Hi „ l3g . Mm .„ e EHJs ig6; State coach, say: i Snirlev Cooley 156; jean Os- Notre Dame is fortunate lo i born 154 have a coach with the qualities , HIGH* SERIES: Billie Sue of Hugh Devore. ; Wilson 477: Marge Ellis 434; They heard Notre Dame ath- Linie Hm 42 6; Shirley Cooley letic director Ed Krause tell of - ~ • •-- — the university's spirit 116; Jean Osborn 409; Phyllis Bradford 408. vStmulings W 29 Opals Cafe 23 Clarks Jewelers 21 Taproot 20 Cox Western Wear 15 Airport Cafe 9 They heard former All-America Notre Dame tackle, George JR cx Restaurant Connor, say: "When my little boy grows up, f hope he has a coach like Hughie Devore." And they heard the Rev. Edmund Joyce, Notre Dame executive vice president, say: ALIBI LEAGUE "To Devore and his staff we HIGH SERIES: Men: ... express our thanks and admira-' ; Cook 506; Had ley Kurtz 483. t j on •• I Larry Hooper 449. Women: Judy But Hughie probably wanted Hooper 465; Gloria Sinclair 407; to hear most of all was never Pa 'Bnilcy 399. cajri I HIGH GAMES: Men: Hadley j Kurtz 197; Ed Cook 195-189; ] Larrv Hooper 181; Women: The Union Unsticks A Tennis Ball i ^M^ G1 « Si "- Ed clair 159: Alice Kurtz 154. By JIM BECKER , Associated Press Sports Writer NEW YORK (AP> — Who 1 stuck the tennis ball in Madison j Square Garden's loudspeaker? | Ken Rosewall did it. I And how did it get unstuck? | It wasn't easy. j In fact, it took about a year. I The tennis ball got stuck up there about 40 feet above Hie Garden floor way back last winter, when Rosewall tossed up a lob. When Rosewall lobs, he lots. This one didn't come down. It stuck between the horns on the big loudspeaker. Since it was a pro tennis match, almost nobody noticed when the ball got stuck. It is not absolutely illegal to pay to see Rosewall play, but at the Garden it sometimes looks that way, and a slim group was on hand. Anyway, it had never happened before and nobody knew how to get the tennis ball out of there. Months went by. The man at the loudspeaker finally complained to the management that the thing was muffling his dulcet tones. The manager called in the foreman. "Get the ball out of there," he said. The foreman called in his assistant. "Get mat ball out of there," the foreman said. The assistant called in a work­ man, who didn't have an assistant, and told him to get the tennis ball out of there. "What are you, some kind of nut?" the workman asked. "I'm not going up there unless you pay me double time.' "So OK. louble time," said the assistant foreman. "Get a long ladder. What will it take you, five minutes?" "At double time it will take me all day," the workman said. "Them's union rules.' So he got a long ladder and propped it up against the loudspeaker, and climbed up, swaying gently. He got the ball and brought it down. "Give nie the ball," the assistant said. The assistant gave it to the foreman, who gave it to the manager, who bounced it on the floor. The tennis ball took one feeble little hop and then rolled quietly off into the corner. It had been stuck up there so long it had gone dead. "Well," the manager said, "it's not a total loss. If we ever get another tennis ball stuck up there we will know what to do. Of course, it's a million to one shot. "But don't put this in the paper." "Why."' "The union might get acre." Illinois HIRII School Basketball (Chicago Area) Lane 91, Mather 84 Harper 77. Fenger 60 Kelvyn Park 72, Prosser 59 Parker 57. Farragut 54 DuSable 74, Marshall 65 St. Louis Sumner 7S, Venice Lincoln 52 49'ers Take Upset Aim At Chicago CHICAGO (AP) — The lowly San Francisco 49ers think they can catch lightning in a bottle twice this National Football League season against the revenge-dedicated Chicago Bears here Sunday. Te Bears are even under greater pressure than when they stumbled at San Francisco, 2014, Oct. 20, for their only setback in a current 9-1-2 record. The Bears hold a scant half- game lead over defending NFL champion Green Bay in the western division race. The Packers (9-2-1) play their semifinal game at Los Angeles Saturday. Thus, a possible Packer triumph could be staring at the Bears from the Wrigley Field scoreboard even before they square off against the 49crs knowing a defeat would drop them into second place. San Francisco's advance man, publicitor Joe Johnson, brought no comfort to Chicago. "Our guys believe they can do it again," he said. Johnson said quarterback LaMar Me Han, who directed the outstanding 49er upset of the Bears, was recovered from injury in last Sunday's 21-17 San Francisco loss to Los Angeles, and would be ready for the Bears Sunday. The Oct. 20 eye-opener at San Francisco marked Mc Han's first start as emergency replacement for injured John Brodie. The well-traveled Mc Han wove the same spell he used to east over the Bars while with the former Chicago Cardinals. However, the Bears won't regard the 49ers as lightly as they did the first time around after floating into San Francisco on a five-game winning streak. Assered rugged Bear tackle Earl Liggett "We certainly owe those guys something." One of the game's sizzling side attractions should come on kickoffs when the Bears' J.C. Caroline, perhaps the NFL's most ferocious kickoff shagger, collides with 49er kickoff vetur specialist Abe Woodson. FIELD TOWNSHIP PEEWEE TOURNEY (Semifinals) Field 21, Bethel 18 Raccoon 62, Ina 20 (Games Saturday) 6:30 Bethel vs. Ina 8:00 Field vs. Raccoon Detroit Has Jinx On Cleveland; Big Red Meets Phil Eagles. ATU\NTIC~CITY. N.J. (AP)On Sunday, Cleveland bumps up against its old jinx team, the Detroit Lions, n club the Browns never have beaten in a regular season game. The only time they whipped the Lions was in the 1954 championship game. If the Browns can tame the Lions they should have clear sailing to at least a tie in the Eastern Conference race of the National Football League. The New York Giants, tied with Cleveland for first with two games to go, have a rugged final with Pittsburgh Dec. 15 after this week's clash with the Washington Redskins. Cleveland plays Washington Dec. 15. Pittsburgh, with a chance to win it all if they can sweep their last two and Cleveland .stumbles once, will be in Dallas where the Co\vix>ys can be tough. Ask the Giants. St. Louis, one game back, must keep its guard up against Philadelphia. Chicago will know what it has to do before it takes the field Sunday against San Francisco, the only team to top them. Green Bay, a half game back of the Bears in the Western Conference plays at Los Angeles Saturday in a nationally televised (CBS) game. San Diego can clinch the Western crown in the American Football league by defeating Oakland and first place in the East will be the prize when Boston and Houston, tied for the lead, meet at Houston. 'Never Seen Boys So High" — Dietzel Army, Navy Teams Grim —Ready For Showdown Doo/ey Gets Hot Seat At Georgia U. ATHENS. Ga. (API—Vincent Joseph Vince Dooley. 31-year- old freshman coach from Auburn, has taken over as head football coach at Georgia in a move to get the Bulldogs back on the winning road after three : losing seasons. I Dooley .succeeds Johnny Grif- j fifth, who compiled a 10-16-4 • record during three years of \ unrest in the Georgia athletic department. Griffith resigned Wednesday, effective Jan. 31. Dooley is the second young coach to be named head of a Southeastern Conference football team in three days. Douglas Dickey. 31, an assistant on Coach Frank Bvoyles' Arkansas staff, was selected Monday to replace Jim McDonald at Tennessee. The Georgia athletic board accepted Griffith's resignation Wednesday, unanimously ap. proved Dooley's selection and t signed him to a four-year con- | tract. His salary was not announced. A native of Mobile, Ala.. Dooley was quarterback of Auburn's 1953 Gator Bowl team coached by Ralph Jordan. After serving in the Marines, he returned to Auburn in 1956 as a backfield assistant. He has been freshman coach since 1961. Griffith, 39, said he has not decided whether to accept an offer to remain with the university in Hie physical education department. Kelso Is Again Horse Of Year BOCA RATON, Fla. fAP) To the surprise of nobody, Kelso from Mrs. Richard C. du- Pont's Bohemia Stable was named today as America's champion thoroughbred race horse for the fourth straight year by the Thoroughbred Racing Associations. Kelso also was the chosen Horse of the Year in a poll conducted by Turf and Sports Digest, completing his sweep of the balloting. The swift - running gelding, who needs only S16S.167 to pass Round Table as the world's leading money winning horse, began his reign as a 3-year-old in 1960. He was the unanimous choice of the TRA Board of Selection this year. His earnings of S569.762 this season brought his life-time bankroll to 1.581,702 for 31 victories in 45 starts. Kelso's only out-of-the money performance this year was in his debut in the sev»n-furlong Palm Beach Handicap at Hialeah Park, when he was fourth back of Ridan, Jaipur and Merry Ruler. He went on to win nine races, cairying as much as 134 pounds under handicap conditions. At one stage he put together a string of eight straight stakes victories, including an unprecedented fourth straight victory in the two miles of the Jockey Club Gold Cup. By WILL GRIMSLEY Associated Pre** Sport* Writer PHILADELPHIA (AP)-There was a grim "We will win" determination about the Army football team that moved into this City of Brotherly Love today for its 64th game with heavily-favored Navy. "We are fighting for our lives," said tight-lipped Paul Dietzel, coach of the West Pointers. "I have never seen a bunch of boys so eager and so intent before a big game. They are really high." The young Army coach shrugged off the U-point odds, favoring the sensational Roger Staubach and his Annapolis cohorts, No. 2 ranked nationally and probably headed for the Cotton Bowl in Dallas if they can pull off their ninth victory in 10 games this year. "I never went into a game I expected to lose," Dietzel said, throwing down the gauntlet to Navy's Coach Wayne Hardin. Hardin didn't flinch. "We have a lot of respect for Army—it is a fine defensive learn," he said. "But we think we are the No. 1 team in the country. We want to prove it." The Midshipmen may get I their chance Saturday. Army and Navy clash at 1:30 p.m. EST in the vast Municipal Stadium, scene of many an exciting and star-spangled thriller in the past, with 100,000 watching from the stands, millions of others from TV screens and Cotton Bowl representatives looking on from the wings. The game will be nationally televised by CBS, starting at 115 p.m. A Navy triumph is certain to bring a bid—and prompt acceptance—for the second-ranked Middies to play No. 1 and unbeaten Texas at Dallas on New Year's Day. Few games betwen the two service academies have created the tensions surrounding this one. which will be staged in a somber atmosphere out of deference to the late commander- in-chief, President John F. Kennedy. The 2,400 member Corps of Cadets and 3,700 brigade of Midshipmen will attend the game but will forego the marching between halves. The only ceremony will be a military musical concert ending with "America the Beautiful," a tribute to the late President Kennedy. GO . . . IN SNOW With ARMSTRONG Silent Storm Kings U.S. Team Wins HOUGHTON, Mich. (AP)The U.S. Olympic hockey team defeated Michigan Tech 3-1 Thursday night as it fired 23 shots on goal in the final 20 minutes, after two scoreless periods. New Recruits For Blue-Gray Clash MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) Seven more college footbal players signed Thursday to play in the Blue-Gray football game Dec. 28. Kentucky lineman Herschel Turner and Virginia end Jake Adams signed Gray contracts. Signing with the Blues were Penn State halfback Don Caum, quarterback Henry Schichtle of Wichita, end Dave Ellison of Purdue, Ken Coleman of Kansas and Indiana guard Carmen Bencivenni. Fight Results MIAMI, Fla. - George Edwards, 155, Panama, and Willie Harris, 150, Miami, drew, 8. MILAN, Italy - Renato Moraes, 171, Brazil, stopped Jack Bedell, 169, Great Britain, 6. Phil Eagles Bought For $5,505,500 Jerry Wolman, 36, Joins List Of Young Millionaires In Pro Came. PHILADELPHIA (API-Boyish - looking, 36-year-old Jerry Wolman has bought the Philadelphia Eagles for $5,505,500, furthering the trend of young millionaires taking control of National Football League teams. Subject to approval of the NFL, Wolman, a Washington contractor, will join such young owners as Art Modell of Cleveland, Dan Reeves of Los Angeles, Clint Murchison of Dallas, the Bidwill brothers of St. Louis and Clay Ford of Detroit. Another trend is toward single ownership. The sale of the Eagles Thursday by 65 stockholders leaves only Green Bay and Minnesota as teams owned by large groups of stockholders. "Ever since I was a kid and hitclihiked from Shenandoah, Pa., (his native town), to Philadelphia to see the Eagles play, I wanted to own this team," Wolman said. He reportedly is worth more than $30 million made by building apartments and office buildings. He owns the National Theater building in Washington and the Raleigh Hotel. He said he expects to move to Philadel- pliia once the purchase is approved. In line with an unwritten NFL rule, Wolman has promised he will control 51 per cent of the stock. His associate, Earl Foreman, a Washington attorney, is buying the other 49 per cent. The new owner also has agreed to keep the team in Philadelphia. Name Jr. College All-Star Squad DODGE CITY, Kan. (AP) — Chowan College of Murfrees- doro, N.C., was the only school to come up with more than one finst team selection on the 1963 all-star football squa d announced today by the National Junior College Athletic Association. Chowan got two players, tackle Bob Prince and halfback Don Mathews, on the first team. Also chosen on te first team was Vem Voss of Joliet, 111., a guard Frank Fencl, Thornton of Harvey, 111., a fullback. Fox Hound Trial DURANT, Miss.. (AP) — A North Carolina dog led 101 other hounds into today's final round of the U.S. open field trials for fox hounds. Deak, owned by G. W. Clayton of Winston-Salem, N.C, had 360 points after Thursday's round. The dog scored high on sped and driving. WORCESTER. Mass. - Joe Gomes, 15, Worcester, out­ pointed Doug day, 157, New York, . 6 Grid Coaches Have Been Fired By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Tlie nation's college football coaches, subjected to periodic outburts of effigy-hanging during the season, now are having trouble hanging onto their jobs. There wore added to the unemployed ranks Thursday, making a total of six in a four-day period. The latest additions are Washington State's Jim Sutherland, Steve Sinko of Boston University and Ohio Wesleyan's Glenn Fraser, who had a combined total of 32 years service at their respective schools. Tlie first coach to lose his job was Tennessee's Jim McDonald, only two days into December— the official opening of open season on coaches. Two days later Georgia's Johnny Griffith and Billy Hildobrand of Wake Forest were asked to vacate their posts. Only two jobs have been filled, by Douglas Dickey at Tennessee and Vince Dooley at Georgia. LOS ANGELES—Manny Elias, 121, Phoenix, Ariz., outpoint­ ed Vincent Garcia, 11, Guadalajara, Mexico, 10. THE PERFECT MOMENT TO ACQUIRE a quality-value used Cadillac If you have always yearned for the luxurious comfort and prestige of Cadillac ownership, visit us at your earliest opportunity. We have the keys to a select few quality-value Cadillacs ... all late models ... all well cared for ... all with low original mileage. These fabulous motor cars are, in every way, a better value than most makes of new cars. Come in and spend sixty minutes behind the wheel and let the car speak for itself in terms of luxury . . . performance and economy. Your family and friends will applaud your choice of a quality-value Cadillac, motordora'a "car of cars". JEFFERSON MOTORS 8th and Jordan Mt. Vernon I GET READY FOR WINTER NOW FRONT END ALIGNMENT SPECIAL 6 Any U .S. t»r. Par* Extra. We ll align front end. correct camber, caster and toe-in to your car manufacturer's specifications, check shocks and exhaust system, repack front wheel bearings for this one low price. TAKE YOUR CAR TO THE EXPERTS G000YEAR SERVICE STORE 1212 Broadway Dial 242-1101 THE WORLDS FIRST SILENT SNOW TIRE DIGS YOU OUT OF SNOW - KEEPS YOU ROLLING IN MUD EASY TERMS RANMAR'S STANDARD TIRE 1014 Bdwy. ~ Dial 242-6560 fj/ou ate invited to attend out GRAND f OPENING FRIDAY AND SA1URDAY DECEMBER 6 and 7 WILSON SHELL SERVICE 10th and Jordan Phone 244-0603 FRANK WILSON Owner SPECIALIZING IN: Motor Turn-up Brakt Servico Wheel Balancing Minor Repair Work Mufflers and Tail Pipes Installed Four 16-0z. Decorated TUMBLERS With Each "Fill-up" Of Shell Gat TREATS FOR THE KIDDIES

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