Alton Evening Telegraph from Alton, Illinois on January 10, 1950 · Page 11
Get access to this page with a Free Trial
Click to view larger version
January 10, 1950

Alton Evening Telegraph from Alton, Illinois · Page 11

Publication:
Location:
Alton, Illinois
Issue Date:
Tuesday, January 10, 1950
Page:
Page 11
Cancel
Start Free Trial

Page 11 article text (OCR)

ALTON EVENING TELEGRAPH Bttibllihtd January IS, 1836. ALTON, ILL., TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1950 Member el The Aeaociated Prew. M Ptt Copy. Little Ice Damage In Jersey County JERSEYVILLE, Jan. 10.—Farmers who came here Monday afternoon reported they believed winter wheat had sustained but. small damage because of the recent Ice coating on fields. Except where the Ice stood In the low areas, there will be no damage from the condition to date, according to the farmers. . The thawing weather of Simday and Monday removed most of the gleet and ice from the fields and meadows of the locality. Observers report that the past week of sleet and Ice has been one KlfCHEN CABINETS FORMICA TOPS LINOLEUM TOPS RATHSKELLER WORK .Installed by Skilled Workmen. DIAL 2-8714 COLSTON'S FIXTURE - EQUIPMENT Humbert St. Rd., ALTON Howard Manning, jerseyvitte. Demo Candidate for Congress of the hardest on bird life In this part of the state for some years There have been other tee storms and cold weather, but the food supply of native birds seemed to have been burled deeper In this locality. Residents are urged to continue feeding birds Combined Meeting Friday JERSEYVILLE— A meeting has been scheduled, Friday, at the Baptist Church for members of the auxiliary executive committee and the officers of the Loyal Daughters, Amoma, Phllathea, Tried and True, and Keystone classes of the church. Large Attendance at .Parish Party JERSEYVILLE — The parish party for members of the congregation of the church of the Holy Ghost took place Sunday evening In Holy Ghost hall. Motion pictures on the mass were shown. Refreshments were served and games were played. Opens Grocery Store Here JERSEYVILLE — Paul Long, who was in the employ of Sam's Grocery, Jerseyvilie, for the past three and one-half years, has opened a grocery store on East Spruce street. BEAD TELEGRAPH WANT ADS Rfelietfe Stuffy N of Head (bid PUT A FEW DROPS IN EACH NOSTRIL Relief from head cold stuffiness starts instantly! You can breathe again! WE MOMENT you put a few Vicki Va-tro-nol Nose Drops in each nostril, you can actually feel yo'ur cold-stuffed nose open tsp in seconds.' •ELIEF COMES SO FAST because'. Vicks Va-tro-nol works right where stuffy trouble is 1 . fit relieves sniffly, sneezy distress... opens up cold- *,§ clogged nose ... lets you breathe again! Try it! VICKS OL NOSI DROPS 'Ah, new I con breath* again.' JERSEYVILLE, Jan. 10.—(Special,) — Petitions are being circulated this week In the 324 precincts of the 20th Congressional district for Howard Manning, Jerseyvllle, who has announced he will seek the Democratic, nomination for Congressman. Manning was born and reared In Jerseyville. He attended schools of this city and graduated from Washington University, where he received a degree In commerce and finance. He was elected to the Illinois State Legislature, where'he served during 1937-38. He left the General Assembly to seek the Democratic nomination for Congressman of the 20th District, but was defeated al that time. The^past 16 years he has been engaged in business in Jerseyville as a member of the firm of Manning & Manning. The firm operated in seven of the 12 counties ot the district of which Manning seeks the nomination. The 20th District is composed ot the counties of Jersey,- Greene, Calhoun, Pike, Scott, Brown, Cass, Schuyler, Adams, McDonough, Morgan, and Hancock. Manning has been chairman of the Jersey , County Democratic Central Committee the past six years and has been active in local and district civic organizations and events. Manning attended a meetin Sunday afternoon of county chair men of Democratic central com mittees of the district at the Dun lap Hotel. Returns to Duty in Texan JERSEYVILLE— Cadet Edwar Albrecht has returned to San An gelo, Tex., following a visit wit tils parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henr Albrecht. He is attending aviatio cadet school at San Angelo. to Undergo Hip Operation JERSEYVILLE—Mrs. Margare McCarthy, St. Louis, mother o Mrs. T. W. Kirby jr. of this city will submit to an operation fo .•elief of a hip injury, Wednesday morning, at St. John's Hospital, SI L.OUJS. She suffered a hip fracture Saturday at her home. Jerseyan Hurt When Auto Strikes Train JERSEYVILLE, Jan. 10. — (Special.)—Arthur Lantz suffered a cracked rib and a number of bruises when his automobile figured in a collision with a string of box cars being switched on the Gulf, Mobile & Ohio Railroad in this city Friday evening. . Lantz was. stunned by the impact and his car damaged to such an'extent that it had to be towed to a local garage for repairs. Lantz was given a physical checkup at the offices of a local physician who taped the cracked rib and administered other medical aid. Farewell Service For Jerseymlle Pastor Sutiday JERSEYVILLE, Jan. 10.—(Spe clal.)—The local Ministerial Al llnnce will sponsor a service o farewell and godspeod for one o its members, the Rev. David B M§xton at. the Presbyterian church Sunday at 8 p. m. The occasion will be « union service. The Rev. Mr. Maxton, who ha: been pastor of the First Presby terlan Church since^May, 1944, has accepted a call to the First Pres byterlan Church In Sterling am he and his family will leave Jan 17. ^ The Junior Westminster group honored the Maxton's at a farewell party in conjunction with its meeting this week. Parents oi the young people were guests al the supper meeting. The Rev Maxton, who hns sponsored the group, was presented a farewell gift, the presentation being made by Miss Helen Bloomer, president of the organization. Mr. and Mrs John Bloomer jr., will assume the sponsorship of the Junior Westminster group until such time as a new pastor of the church begins his duties. Whit* iUtnli tint ud wh«i trim ria» optloul at iitr* toil Make Studebaker your 195O buy word for thrift and solid value / Men of conscience and competence—many of them members of unique father-and-son teams — build long-lasting durability (•to every 19SO Studebaker. Ua*VeMie*) •* MW fMtfwtl The "miracle ride" of the 1950 •tudebakcr ii the talk of. the motoring world. A new perfection of balance) A brand-new kind of front-cad ceil •pringing. Tht ntw car that's rtally 1950 in distinctly* "n«xt look"... in relaxing "noxt rid*"...in driving •as* and durability I G IVE your new-car money a chance to buy you America's top value in a low-price automo> bile this time, Step out of the groove of habit and into a Studebaker showroom. Come in and treat yourself to a close-up eyeful of the refreshingly new and different 1950 Studebaker Champion. Watch how completely this great new low-price Studebaker wins you when you go for a drive! Low, long, alluring, this thrifty 1910 Studebaker is rt*lh 1950 all the way through. It's out ahead jn "next ride" as well as "next look"—the fastest wiling new car in Studebaker history! Jersey PTA Studies Reading Program JERSEYVILLE, Jan. 10 — The Parent-Teacher Association of Jerseyville" Elementary Schol studied the school reading program at its meeting last week. Methods used in teaching the children to read was explained to the parents and text books and materials used were displayed by Prln. O. A. Wilson, jr. The system is geared to match the pupils speed in reading. Entertainment was provided fty the pupils of the fifth grade. A number of pupils at the school who have had some instruction in swimming, have been enrolled in an advanced beginner class in swimming in an endeavor to tit them to pass their Red Cross beginners' test before the spring swimming season starts. The pupils will attend class weekly at the YWCA, Alton, at 6 p. m. Mondays, under a Red Cross instructor. A similar class is being held at 6:30 p. m., Mondays, for a number of school children of the rural schools who had in struction last year but failed to pass the tests. Arrest Two Traffic Violators in Jersey JERSEYVILLE, Jan. 10.—(Special.)—Two residents of Jacksonville were arrested here about 1 a. m., Sunday, by officers from Greene County, following a pur suit from Carrollton to this city. Jerseyville night police reported the Greene County officers halted the fleeing car of the Jacksonville residents only by shooting one of the tires. The two were taken into custody here and the car was placed in a local garage pending the outcome of charges against them in Greene County. Jerseyville police records show the two were arrested here for a traffic violation reported as having been committed in Carrollton. Officers from Greene County told local officials that, the pursuit required a speed of 80 miles per hour over Route 67. Jerseyan Eligible for Additional Fox Bounty JERSEYVILLE, Jan. 10.—(Spe cial.)—George Kirchner of Rich' wood township, who came here and collected bounty on 21 fox )elts Friday, returned to Jersey ville to collect bounty on another pelt Saturday. "When I got home Friday evening," Kirchner reported, "I fount hat I had miscounted my pelts and that I had 22 instead of 21.' Kirchner brought the entire atch back to the. office of County :ierk Grover Pearce Saturday to verify his statement. To date, he las brought in the largest catch of foxes thii season. Soap Carving It Theme JERSEYVILLE—The art lesson 'or Jersey County schools for Jan uary wil he "Soap Carving." Mrs Charles H. Daniels, who Is in charge of the rural art program in ,he county, gave Instructions for .he work to teachers at the meet ngs Friday evening and Saturday afternoon. Returns front Hospital JERSEYVILLE —Mr«. Mildred appell has returned to her homu here from Missouri Baptist Hos- iltal, St. Louis, whe/e she has «en a patient for several weeks. Jnderioe* Emergency Operation JERSEYVILLE — Joy Crawford ,vas taken to Our Saviour's Hos Ita), Jacksonville, Friday, where he underwent an emergency op- ration for relief of appendicitis. lersey Resident In Mediterranean JERSEYVILLE.-Mr. and Mrs. ..eonard Clasibrenner received a etter Monday from their son, M/S 'red Glascbrenner of the air force, nnounclng that he was en route o the Mediterranean with an air orce unit. He was making the rip on the carrier Midway, but id not know hit destination. Leland Kreid Motor Co. ALTON DIAL 3-8887 310 STATS $f. ASTHMA Mucus Coughs Qricklv firM Jersey Man's Father Buried at Springfield JERSEYVILLE, Jan. 10.— (Special. )— Word was received here Sunday of the death of George Victor Orris of Sth-lhgfleld, father of R. V. Orris of Jerseyville, manager of the Jersey Lumber Co., which occurred at 6:30 p. m., Sunday, at St. John's Hospital, Springfield. Mr. and Mrs. Orris have been In Springfield for some time with the former's r ather during his ill ness. Surviving are the widow; Ronald Victor Orris; two sisters, Mrs. Leonard Thurson of Aurora, and Mrs. Verna Gregg of Triumph, III., and one granddaughter, Carol Ann Orris of this city. Funeral services were conducted at 1 p. m., today at Bisch Memorial Home, Springfield, and burial was in that city. Mason* to Confer Degrees JERSEYVILLE.—.lerseyville Masonic lodge* will confer the third degree on a class of two candidates at a meeting qf the lodge Wednesday evening. Work will begin at 7:30, Masons are invited. Many Japanese Shipwrecked TOKYO — UP) — Shipwrecks cost 5410 vessels—mostly fishing boats —In Japanese waters last year-^-an average of almost 15 craft a dny. The marine safety v board blamed typhoons and other "Irresistible forces of nature" for 40 percent of the losses. Careless navigation was listed as the cause of 25 percent, faculty design or obsolescence 15 percent; and the remainder miscellaneous. READ TELEGRAPH WANT ADS Rotariam Initiated Into Mysteries of Prefab Holes G. A. Rohlfing, assistant personnel manager of the Aluminum Ore Co., Enst St. Louis, who said he was also founder and president of Prefabricated Holes nnri Kxon- vations, Inc., spoke to the Hotnry Club Monday night on his operations in the latter firm. Holes, he pointed out, play a very Important pnrl in the human life. Government spending being what It is, the average person is born about. $2500 "in thr liolc," never gets out all his life, and finally is buried in one. His definition of n hole, worked out by his sales department, was "An area in which by application of force of disintegration the elements have hern removed irom the constituent elements thereto." Hole, he sairl, could be classified as concrete or abstract—or, in, simpler language, positive and negative. Positive holes, he said, are those created for a purpose, like buttonholes, holes in pipes, well, etc.; negative, those "not created for a purpose with mainly a nuisance value, such as holes in pants pocket and socks. His first venture into the. business was during the war when he \vas down in Arkansas supervising mining of aluminum ore. He got his eye on n lot of holes down there 100 feet deep and a mile in diameter, and had the thought of reprocessing them and putting them on the market. His first request, for service came from a farmer who wanted to get a 300-foot well moved. His men found quickly that as fast. as they dug out the dirt, the hole disintegrated. He hired some engineers. They evolved the Idea of putting refrigeration coils down tin 1 hole, freezing It, Inserting a corkscrew, and pulling up the hole. That job gave him the capital to expand, he said. His firm also branched Into making pigment for transparent paint, shadows, shady spots, and burps. His engineers developed holes to be shot right along with bullets to increase their penetrating depth. They licked one problem. That was developing n liole that, wouldn't stray away from the bullet during flight because of gravity and wind. They got the idea of taking the heavy holes out of lead mines. A posthole the firm developed could outlast four cedar posts. It was guaranteed to remain there when the post was pulled out. To help speed up his wormholf production for antique furniture manufacturers he had the agriculture college cross up termites with woodpeckers, creating a ter- pecker. Before "President" Rohlflr look over to deliver his "deadpan" dissertation, the club (seriously) heard several announcements. /Dne, by Brown, club chairman of arrangements, was on the selection of officers and chairmen tot the May district convention of Rotary, Scheduled here. Ralph Luken has been named secretary; Dudley Glberson, treasurer, for the conclave. Dr. Mather Pfeiffenberger, International relations chairman for the club read several letters of appreciation from European families who had received CARE packages sent by the club. Drainage Bill Introduced WASHINGTON, Jan. 10. <£•)—A bill to authorize levee work in the Indian Grave Drainage district of Illinois was Introduced In Congress yesterday. Rep. Simpson (R-fll), who Introduced the measure, said It provides for raising and strengthening of flood walls which army engineers estimate will cost about $1,962,000. Forty per cent of the land of the United States and 35 per cent of Iti natural resources are In the West, yet only. 14 per cent of the Amerl* can people live In this region. Personal To Women With Nagging Backache An we get older, itrem «nd itnin, over* exertion, excewive •mokiiiB or exposure t« cold Rometlmes «low« down kidney function. This m«y lead m«ny folkii to eom« plain of imBRint backache, ton of p«p and energy, headache* and diuineu. Getting up nights or frequent pauafn m«r man from minor bladder irritation* due to cold, tlampnesK or dietary indlicretiona. If your diicomforta are due to tBCM CHUMS, don't wait, try Doan'a Pllta. • »IM diuretic. Used luccetifully by million* for over 60 year*. While the»e symptom* Bar often otherwise occur, It'* amailnf how msny times Doan's live happy iwtaf — hrlp the 15 miles of kidney tube* amd fllUff fluah out waste. Get Doan's Pill* todwrl . . . The Suit* That H*ve Everything for Spring —, 49.95 to 65.0* No funny business to date them . . . alf are perfect examples of the famous Handmacher penchant for simplicity, good tailoring, fine fabrics. Dressed "up" or "down," their basic beauty makes them at home any hour of your busy day, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., in navy, beige, black or grey—miron gabardine, brillianteeri or sharkskin. Misses' sizes 10 to 20, *oun olont t — / v

Get full access with a Free Trial

Start Free Trial

What members have found on this page