Alton Evening Telegraph from Alton, Illinois on January 3, 1950 · Page 19
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January 3, 1950

Alton Evening Telegraph from Alton, Illinois · Page 19

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Alton, Illinois
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Tuesday, January 3, 1950
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ALTOM Loss of Rites Troubles Reds Pressure Heaviest at Baby Baptfctiift By mAWK BRUTTO ROME, Jan. 3, (#>— Glovanl Wcolomo, Italian Catholic Communist, today Is a troubled man. H« It troubled by the threat of •jtcommunlcatlon— removal from his church. HI* party leaders, among them l»almlro Togllattl, tell him not to be afraid. But Giovanni often la afraid. Lulgl Longo, tough Communist and reputed leader of the party's underground organ!- cation, tells him "excommunication Is of concern only to those who believe in such things." But Giovanni (pseudonym for the typical Italian worker), uullki the nucleus of his parly's hierarchy, nearly nlways does believe. How much the Cnthollc Church's six-months old excommunication decree against militant Communists has contributed to the party's losses In Italy cannot definitely be measured. But Impartial observers agree that It weighs constantly and with Increasing pressure upon the masses of Italy's Communists. The pressure is heaviest when there Is n baby to be baptized, a marriage ot be performed, a member of the family to bo buried. Early this year, before the July 14 decree, a spokesman for Randolfo Pacciardl, republican defense minister, claimed (hat Italian Communists had lost, 7011,000 members. TogllaUt relorled sharply. He said paid up memberships last Februray totaled 1,896,634, compared with 2,1200,000 In the third quarter of the preceding year. To- gllattl said that, "in all probability" this figure would be reached in the first half of 1949. But, with 1049 nearly ended, the party has made no pronouncement on membership. Just past mid-year, July 26, Pietro Secchla, chief organizer, told the Communist central committee the party had lost 90,000 members in six months, but did not give the total membership. Good sources believe it has decrease more since then, and that It will decrease further during the 1950 holy year. Since excommunication was decreed there have been few Incidents. In the Milan area two priests were slapped for refusing to perform funeral service for communists. Another was beaten when he refused to baptize a baby, one of whise godparents was a militant Communist. Trying to counter the excommunication decree, the Communist directorate last August announced a "cultural offensive." It was to include scientific discussions, establishment of libraries, youth gatherings and debates. Little of It has been heard since then. The party also tried to establish a "civil rite" for member* who died outside the church. Last September, when a priest refused to officiate at a Communist'* funeral, his companions, carrying eight red flags, took him to a cemetery on Rome's outskirts and performed what the Communist press described as the first "civil rite" service. There has not been another. Many Private Pension Plans Tell the world you have perfect taste! Wear this chic casual with its trim details. Stitched pleats release fulness at back and there are no side-skirt seams! Pattern 4576 comes In sizes 12, 14, 16, 18, 20. Size 16 takes 4 yards 39-Inch fabric. This pattern, easy to use, simple to sew, I* tested for fit. Has ijomplete illustrated Instructions. Send 25 cento in coin* for thin pattern to ANNE ADAMS, care of Alton Telegraph, 177, Pattern Dept., 243 Went 17th St., New York 11, N. Y. Print plainly NAME, ADDRESS, SIZE and STYLE NUMBER. Send 15 cents more for our Anne Adams Fashion Book. Pages of patterns for the whole family; smart styles for every occasion. Includes n free pattern printed right, in the book. Nearly All Use Social Security as Base WASHINGTON, Jan. 3, <<Pl— There are almost as many varieties of pension systems in this country as there are companies which pay pensions. Many private plans were started voluntarily by employers before the federal social security program came into being. Many were then modified because the companies could not support the old systems while assuming the burden of the federal payroll tax. In recent years most private plans have been tied to federal pensions in one way or another. Under them, employes may or may not share the cost with the employer. There are almost infinite variations and combinations of plans. The following are n few example*, most of them in terms of a single man who has reached age 65. Social Security The minimum pension is $10 a month. The maximum Is. $45.20, paid to a worker who has earned at least $'-!50 a month for .the 13 years of tlio federal system. In the 1980's the maximum will reach $57.60; to qualify for It, a worker will have had to receive a $250 monthly wage from age 21 to 65. His contribution Is 1 percent of his salary up to $3000. His employer contributes another 1 percent to the government Insurance fund. Each contribution will rise to one an$l one-half percent on Jan. 1. Congress probably will approve bigger pensions this spring. 1'rivulo 1'luiit One self-Insured, company-administered, non-contributory typo In the steel Industry was set up first as an employers' voluntary system. The agreements ending the recent steel strike raised the benefits as of Jan. l. This plan covering workers, provides pension* at age 65 tor those with 15 years service, The payments amount to 1 percent of the average monthly wage over the last 10 years of service, multiplied by the actual number of years worked. For a worker with 15 year's aervice at $400 « mont... it means a |60 monthly pension. The minimum for any worker With |B year's service.U $100 a pf wage. Many t more, But all Exceptional Casual PATTERN 4576 sins 17-20 Crochet News So easy yet so lovely! The petals are worked over the filet chochet. Square is simplest design, will be easy to memorize. Be first to use this lovely design! Pattern 843 has crochet directions and visual charts. , Laura Wheeler's Improved pattern makes needlework so simple with its charts, photos and concise directions. Send 30 cenU In ruins for thi« pattern to Alton Telegraph, 6«, Needlecraft Dept., P. O. Box 161, Old CheJtea Station. New York 11, N. V. Print plainly FAT- TERN NUMBER, your NAME and ADDRESS. Here's good news! Send 15 cents more for your fascinating Laura Wheeler Needlocraft Book —today! 104 Illustrations of your favorite needle-hobbles--!he choices! designs and the most concise patterns available. Beginner easy designs, and ideas worthy of an export's attention. A Free needlework pattern printed In the book. benefits the pensioner receives. Union Plan* The International Ladles Garment Workers Union (ILGWU) ms worked out a pay-as-you-go ystem with New York employer!. The retired workers gets $65 a month Kite has been a paid up union member for 11 years and employed by a participating company since 1044. If the federal >enslons are increased, the ILGWU ilan will be reconsidered. The cost is paid solely by cm- >loycrs. Each contributes an amount equal to .'< percent of his >uyi'oll of union members. Instead of setting up a reserve i pay pensions for past services, he ILGWU plan grants only as iiany pension applications as it nas funds to provide lifetime benefits. At first It selected pensioners In order of age. Now sufficient money it being taken in to take care of all persons reaching 65. If the plan were to end, present workers would get nothing, but Hi use already pensioned would continue to receive benefits, Generally, it co&U morn to gut an article from the factory Into the hands of the consumer than It does to manufacture it. On the average, 60 percent of the price paid to I he retailer goes to cover Ihf tkpanaea of distribution. * TlttOKAM WATER TANK RISES IN NORTHSIDE—Welded steel structure is growing in field to the north of old Jerseyville road just beyond Delmar intersection. Hoisting machinery and welding power generators are in right foreground, and at base of tower a precurved sheet is ready for lifting to start a new round on top row.—Staff photo. Proceedings of The City Council of The City of Alton, Illinois. Official Report COUNCIL CHAMBER, ALTON, ILLINOIS. DECEMBER 28th, 1949. A regular meeting of the City Council of the City of Alton, Illinois, was held on the above date, in the Council Chamber of said city at the hour of 7:30 O'clock P. M. Mayor Earl Linkogle, presiding. On call of the roll the following aldermen were present: Warren, Charles Dooley, Wetsteln, James Dooley, Morrison, Waide, Gross, Schaefer, Whetzel, Timmermiere and Brown—11. Absent: Geltz and Perica—2. Alderman Geltz came in later and took his seat. On motion of Mr. Warren seconded by Mr. Wctstein, the minutes of the last regular meeting were approved as recorded by the City Clerk by the following vote: Ayes: Warren, Charles Dooley, Wetstein, James Dooley, Morrison, Waide, Gross, Schaefer, Whetze), Timmermiere and Brown—11. Nays: None. COMMUNICATIONS City Clerk read a letter from the G.A.A.C. recommending that the Mayor and members of the City Council defer any action as to creating e new Municipal Golf Course Commission. On motion of Mr. Charles Dooley seconded by Mr. Timmer- miere, said matter was referred to the Playground and Recreation Commission. City Clerk read a letter from the G.A.A.C., suggesting that the Mayor and City Council ascertain the relative rental value of City property and then set a fair minimum floor for such rentals. On motion of Mr. James Dooley, seconded by Mr. Schaefer, said letter was received and placed on file. Alderman Geltz came in at this time and took his seat, APPOINTMENTS The Mayor at this time appointed Henry Graves special patrolman for the City, without compensation from the City ot Alton. On motion of Mr. Warren, seconded by Mr. Waide, said appoint- ment was confirmed by a unanimous vote on call'of the roll. REPORTS OF STANDING COMMITTEES Alderman Schaefer presented audited bills chargeable to the following accounts: Cleaning Streets, $511.35; Fire Department, $3720.98; Salary, $1856.66; Police, $3735.00; Repairing Paved Streets, $90.40; Public Benefit Fund, $15.00; Public Buildings, $223.17; Sewers, $471.03; Sidewalks, $79.50; Civil Service, $37.50; Engineers Salary, $162.50; Garbage Fund, $1100.20; Municipal Band Fund, $12.00; Motor Fuel Tax Fund, $10.50; Liquor Control, $22.50; Safety, $90.10; Parking Meter Fund, $822.60; Emergency Repair Fund, $303.73; Inspection Fund, $26.10. Alderman Schaefer moved that all audited bills as presented be paid; motion seconded by Mr. Warren, and on call oC the roll, motion was adopted by the following vote: Ayes: Warren, Charles Dooley, Wetstein, James Dooley, Morrison, Geltz, Waide, Gross, Schaefer, Whetzel, Timmermiere and Brown —12. Nays: None. Alderman Brown presented the bond of Henry Graves, and made motion seconded by Mr. Timmer- miere that said bond be approved, and on call of the roll, said bond was approved by a unanimous vote. ORDINANCES Alderman Geltz read for the 4th time Ordinance No. 2342 and made motion seconded by Mr. James Dooley, said ordinance be Grunt 7 Divorces In Circuit Court EDWARDSVILLE, January 3.— Circuit Judge R. W. Griffith entered decrees in seven unconteited divorce cases heard Friday in Ctr cult Court. Granted divorces were: Opal N. Weaver, from Edward T. Weaver, grounds of cruelty; David B. Best, from .Pearl Esther Beit, on proof of desertion; Sam Saunders, from Grace Snunders, on grounds ot cruelty, with the plaintiffs awarded custody of three children born to the couple by a previous marriage; Margaret C. Norman, from William W. Norman, on proof of desertion, with the plaintiff awarded custody of two children, Margaret Louise and W'.iiain Ronald Norman. Jean Jarboc, from Thomas F. Jarboe, on grounds of cruelly, and the plaintiff permitted to resume her former name of Theodore; Betty Nicholson, from Robert Dane Nicholson, grounds of cruelty, with the plaintiff's maiden name of Antrobus restored; Lola Adeline Wilson, from Elba A. Wilson, also on grounds of cruelty, and the plaintiff awarded custody of a daughter, Dixie Lee Wilson. Veru L. Roy was granted a divorce by Judge Griffith recently from Lawrence E. Roy on ground! of cruelty and awarded custody of two children, Lawrence Jr., and Carol Jane Roy. AIR PROVING GROUND, Kglln, Fla.—Cpl. Patrick L. Gaither, 19, son of Mr, and Mrs. James Gaith- of 1313 Rodem«yer, Alton, has been discharged from the Air Force. Cpl. Gailher attended Al ton High school and graduated with the class of 1947. He has been assigned to Kglin Air Force Bate, headquarters of the All' Proving Ground, and site of the famous climatic hangar, the huge, ollmatlr, equipment-testing laboratory oC the Air Fore*. LOOK * You Can Buy A USED Guaranttwd REFRIGERATOR FOR . . DAY PUT YOUR QUARTER IN THE METER NO DOWN PAYMENT COME IN AND LET US EXPLAIN IT TO YOU Each quarter you put Is) tke meter applies to your aeeeuat. 1 When your aeeaunt to pal* Ike meter it roaaove* as* refrigerator Is yawn. LANDLORDS - Your ttiunii would appreciate this. RLTOH MEFRICtRRTian IM BL ftteiriway Dial l-mi laid ov*t and on ettt of If* rofl Mid ordinance wat laid ovtt by the following vote: Ayes: W«freti, Chwtei Dootey, James Dooley, G«H*, Waide, Oft**, Sehaefer, Whetzel-* ^ Nays: Wetstein, Morrison, Tim* mermlere and Bf own—4. • Alderman Gelt* r«ad tot the first lime Ordinance No. 2344 and made motion for the iulpwislftA of the rules, said motion seconded by Mr. Warren, and on call of th«J roll, the rules were suspended by the following vote: Ayes: Warren, Charles Dooley, Wetstein, Morrison, Geltz, Waide, Gross, Schaefer, Wheteel, Tim- mermiere and Brown—11. Nays: James Dooley—1. Alderman Geltz then read Ordinance Na 2344 for the second time and mad* motion for the adoption of said ordinance, said motion seconded by Mr. Warren. Mr. Geltz made motion seconded by Mr. Warren that Walter T. Woodcock be granted the floor and on call of the roll said motion was carried by a unanimous vote. Mr. Woodcock then addressed the City Council and spoke rela tlve to Ordinance No. 2344. On call of the roll on the motion for adoption of said ordinance, said ordinance was adopted by. the following vote: Ayes: Warren, Charles Dooley, Wetstein, Morrison, Geltz, Waide, Gross, Schaefer, Whetzel, Tim- mermiere and Brown—12. Nays: James Dooley—1, Said Ordinance as adopted Is as follows: * ORDINANCE NO. 2S44 AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR THE SUBMISSION TO THE VOTERS OF THE CITY OF ALTON, MADISON COUNTY, ILLINOIS, OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY QUES* TION AS TO WHETHER A PUBLIC LIBRARY AND READING ROOM SHALL BE ESTABLISHED AND CREATED IN THE CITY OF ALTON, AT A SPECIAL MUNI^ CIPAL ELECTION TO BE HELD IN AND FOR SAID CITY ON THE 21st DAY OF JANUARY, 1950. WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Alton, Madison County, Illinois, did on the 26th day of October, 1949, adopt an Ordinance entitled "ORDINANCE TO CREATE AND ESTABLISH A PUBLIC LIBRARY AND READING ROOM AND TO AUTHORIZE THE MAYOR TO APPOINT A BOARD OF DIRECTORS FOR SAME." and, • WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Alton is thereby empowered and authorized to levy In any one year a tax, not to exceed one and two-tenths (1.2/10) mills on the dollar annually on all taxable property in the City for library purposes: NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF ALTON, MADISON COUNTY, ILLINOIS, AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. That the question as to whether a public library and reading room shall be created and established in the City of Alton, and as to whether the City Council shall exercise its power to levy the tax as aforesaid, be submitted to the voters of said city at the special municipal election to be held in and for said City on the 21st day of January, 1950, between the hours of six o'clock in the morn- WtoUtf lift Co, KM Ml* Ing and fit* noon el stM flection 2. that Mid shall be held In the several *tt«» tlon prteuteu in «Mh wtrtId said CHy M heretofore establish* ed by thla City Council as voting precincts for all city elections, and the polling places for said election shall be M the places heretofore ettabllahed as polling places tor th« general city election, the same being as enumerated in the form of notice set forth In Section a of this Ordinance. Section 3. That for said election, the City Council shall designate the appointment of certain persons to act as Judges and clerks, in accordance with the laws and statutes of the State of Illinois. Section 4. That for said special election each voter shall vote at the polling place designated In the election precinct within which he resides. The polls for said special election shall be kept open.on the date aforesaid from the hour of six o'clock A. M. until the hour of five o'clock P. M. when said polls shall be closed. Section 5. That the Clerk, of said city shall cause notice of said election to be given by publishing notice thereof once In The Alton Evening Telegraph, the same being a newspaper published In and of general circulation within saU City and by posting notice of said election-in at least three prominent places within said City and at each of the polling places herein designated, the date of such publication and posting of said notice to be not more than thirty (30) days nor less than fifteen (15) days prior to the date of such election and that, both published and posted notices shall be in substantially the following form: (Form of Notice) NOTICE OF SPECIAL CITY. ELECTION TO THE VOTERS OF THE CITY OF ALTON, MADISON COUNTY, ILLINOIS: PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that at the special city election to be held in and for the City of Alton, Madison County, Illinois on the 21st day of January, 1950 there will be submitted to the legal voters of said City for their approval, the public policy question as to whether a public library and reading room shall be established in the City of Alton, and Incidental thereto as to whether the City Council of the City of Alton shall exercise its power to levy a public library tax in the amount not to exceed one and two-tenths (1.2/10) mills on the dollar annually on all taxable property in the City for library purposes. Said election will be held in the several election precincts of each of the wards of said City heretofore established by ordinance as voting precincts for all city elections, and the polling places established for said election are as follows: WARD NUMBER 1 Precinct Number 1 Polling Place: Union Storage and Transfer Co., State and Wall. Precinct Number 2, Polling Place: Water Tower Shelter House. Precinct Number 3, Polling Place: 844 Danforth Street. Precinct Number 4, Polling Place: D. of U. V. Hall, 2334 State St. WARD NUMBER S Precinct Number 1 Polling Hun*** i Rttfus EMtan 1611001, Nelson . Precinct Number t felling Place: No. 3 Hose House, 8411 State St. Precinct Number 1 Polling Place: City Hall, Third and Alby. Prednct Number 2 P*™*? Place: Brown's Residence, 403 E. 8th St. Precinct Number 3 Polling Place: Myndman's Garage, 1239 Alby St. WARD NUMBER 4 Precinct Number 1 Polling Place: Nash Auto Show Room, 512 E. Broadway. Precinct Number 2 Polling Place: Turner Hall, 4th and Ridge Sts. Precinct Number 3 Palling Place: Purity Bakery, 701 Henry Street. Precinct Number 4 Polling Place: Klinke BWg., 6th and Oak. WARD NUMBER • Precinct Number 1 polling Place: Hellrung's Shelter House, 707 Central. Precinct Number 2 Polling Place: Carter Bros., 1400 E. Broadway. Precinct Number 3 Polling Place: 2402 E. Broadway. Precinct Number 4 Polling Place: Zimmerman Residence, 1313 Pearl Street. WARD NUMBER • Precinct Number 1 Polling Place: Haskell House, 1211 Henry St. Precinct Number 2 Polling Place: Manshold Residence, 1209 Highland Ave. Precinct Number 3 Polling Place: No. 2 Hose House, 1417 Central Avenue. Precinct Number 4 Polling Place: Doyel Residence, 2205 Johnson Street. • WARD NUMBER 7 Precinct Number 1, Polling Place: Robertson's Garage, 1211 Pine Street. Precinct Number 2 Polling Place: Upper Alton Studio, 1520 .Washington Avenue. . Precinct Number 3 Polling Place: Fire Department, 2422 College Avenue. Precinct Number 4 Polling Place: Balster's Residence, 2309 Humbert. Precinct Number "5 Polling Place: Kane Residence, 3016 College Ave. The /polls at said election will be opened at six o'clock in the morning and will be closed at five o'clock in the evening of said day. All persons qualified to vote at general municipal elections are qualified to vote at said special election and qualified legal voters of the City must vote at the polling place designated for the election precinct within which they By orter of the City Conndl of the CHy «t Alton, Madlaon Ctfun* ty, llHnois. Dated thlt atth day of Dec*m« tef 1049 ' ' EARL LtNKOdLE, Mayor. PAUL A. PRICE, City Clerk. Section 6. That the ballot to M used at sal* special election here- inapove referred to shall be In substantially the following form: (Fa** ef BaltoU OFFICIAL BALLOT Shall a public library and read* Ing room be established In the City of Alton, In accordance with a certain Ordinance passed by the City Council of the City of Alton, on the 28th day ot October, 1949, entitled "An Ordinance to create and establish a public library and reading room and to authorise the mayor to appoint a Board of Directors for same." YES | NO On the back of said ballot shall appear the following: OFFICIAL BALLOT to vote upon the question as to whether a public library shall be establish. ed in the City of Alton at the spe> clal municipal election to be held In said city on the 21st day of January, 1950, at Ward Number , Election Precinct No.-—, Polling Place - ' i /s/ Paul A. Price City Clerk of the City of Alton, Madison County, Illinois. Section 7. That the City Clerk shall cause a sample ballot to be published once In the Alton Evening Telegraph, the same being a newspaper published in and having a general circulation in said City the date of such publication to be not less than five (5) days prior to the date of said election. Section 8. That this ordinance shall become effective Immediately upon its passage and approval. PASSED by the City Council of the City of Alton, Illinois, on this the 28th day of December, 1949. APPROVED by the Mayor of the City of Alton, Illinois, on this the 29th day of December, 1949. EARL LINKOGLE, Mayor. Attest: PAUL A. PRICE, City Cleric of th* City of Alton, Illinois. (Seal cf the City of Alton, Illinois) On motion of Mr. Brown seconded by Mr. Geltz, the meeting adjourned on call of the roil by a unanimous vote. Signed, PAUL A. PRICE, City Clerk, Alton, Illinois. (Seal ft the City of Alton, Illinois) BUY ANTAMINE TABLETS TONIGHT AT THRIFTY DRUG STORES 6 BIO STORES—ALTON, WOOD RIVER, JERSEYVILLE. 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Now for millions-no lost work or wages! No days out of school! !•*•-Motto fry Orovt) Ufcorotor/M Grove's Antamine is a pure white tablet— ii's safe! It's guaranteed by the famous Grove Laboratories-specialists in cold* preparations for over 60 years. CAUTION! Be safe! Don't take just "any* amMiistaminc-always ask specifically for Gaovi't ANTAMlNg (pronounced "Aunt O" Mine"). At all drug stores. Only 39*. ANMUVMCANItUM •en'l evar tame* 1 yaw «sM w your featilr. Take effective. And Giove'i A ken ii «•!• tvca for childita. SC IAfl*-SUV ANTAMINII MAPI SV MOVI-A NAM! YOU CAN TSUITI Ilk,.

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