Alton Evening Telegraph from Alton, Illinois on August 30, 1972 · Page 14
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August 30, 1972

Alton Evening Telegraph from Alton, Illinois · Page 14

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Wednesday, August 30, 1972
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B-2 Alton Evening Telegraph Wednesday, August 30, 1972 Barr pitches name into books By PAUL LeBAR ST. LOUIS (AP> - "I'm not going 1o second-guess myself," said .Tim Rarr. who missed a no-hitter hut pitched himself into baseball's record book Tuesday night, Tht 6-foot-S San Francisco Giants right-hander, perfect through 6 2-3 innings, wound «p with a three-hitter in recording a 3-0 victory over the St. Louis Cardinals." In so doing, he snapped a 13-year-old mark by retiring 41 straight batters to shade by three the old majors mark set by former Pittsburgh Pirates left-hander Harvey Hadciix at 38 over two games. Haddix did it by adding 12 innings of perfect pitching to two retired in a previous game in 1059, eventually losing the game in the nth. Rarr, newly appointed to the Giants' starting rotation, topped the record by adding the Tuesday night stint to 21 in a row he retired during a 2-0 shutout over the Pittsburgh Pirates six days earlier. "The Pirates game was a better game than this. I made more bad pitches here." insisted Rarr, whose no-hit bid was ended by Bernie Carbo's double. "I think I had a little bit belter control against the Pirates,' 1 he ad'eel. "I got away with some pitches tonight." Until farbo snapped the spell, only Ted Simmons had hit the ball viciously against Ran', who mixed an effective slow curve with sliders and fast balls in a duel against Reggie Cleveland. Luis Melendez slapped a pitch into leftfield for the Cards' second hit in the oigh'.h inning and the clubs battled scorelcssly into the n nth. It might have gone on that way except Dwain Anderson booted Jim Howarth's grounder to third opening the final inning and Cleveland, 1311, hit Chris Spcier with a pitch. Ken Henderson then sacrificed the two Giants ninners to third and second, Dave R a d e r was intentionally walked and Dave Kingman delivered a towering blast that went to (he base of the wall in left-center for a bases- clearing double. Reflecting on the feat Carbo's double mined, Rarr, fi-7, acknowledged, "I thought about. 11; I knew it was there. A guy In the stands told me about it, but I already knew." "I got to 2-0 on him." he said. "I had to try to come in with a strike. I thought about a slider, but I tried a fast ball and thought 'well, maybe he'll pop it up or ground it out.'" "I got it up a little bit, but it really wasn't that bad a pitch. I had two out and I couldn't start getting funny and walk the guy." "It would have been nice to have a no-hitter," Barr mused, "but as long as you pitch a shutout that's okay, too." S, F. Bonds Hownrth Maddox Speler Mende'n Rader Kingman Fuentes Gallag'r Barr (3) AB R 4 0 4 1 0 0 3 1 3 0 3 1 4 0 4 0 3 0 4 0 H 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 CARDS AB Brock 4 Slzcmo'e 4 Carbo 3 Torre 3 Simmo's 3 Melend'z 3 Amters'n 3 MaxvllI 2 Crosby l Clevef'd 2 Cruz 1 <0) R 0 .0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 H 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 Totals 32 3 7 Totals 29 0 3 Inning 12.1 450 78ft—R II E Snn Frnnclsco 000 000 003—3 7 0 Cardinals 000 000 000—0 3 1 Spitz eyes fourth goldie By BOB JOHNSON MUNICH (AP) - "I'm afraid of everybody," said a smiling Mark Spitz. The handsome Californian has nothing to fear tonight. It's not until Thursday night that he goes after the fourth of what he hopes will be an incredible seven gold medals. But starting next week, Uie Super Bowl picked as easy winner By CHARLES CHAMBERLAIN DU QUOIN, Dl. (AP) Most experts of the harness racing set expect Super Bowl, driven by Stanley Dancer, to win the $119,090 Hambletonian Wednesday in straight heats. The three-year-old trotting star of 1972 comes up for the classic in peak condition, having won his last seven starts and 12 of 16 for the year. He has earned $324,677 and can add on $59,545 by taking the Hambletonian, a betless race. Times on the Du Quoin State Fairgrounds mile oval, where Ayres set a record of 1:56 4-5 in 1964, are predicted to be in the 1:58-1:59 range Wednesday. Super Bowl's 1:58 3-5 is the best of the year for the field. The first horse to win a pair of mile heats is the Ham- bletonian champion. The first heat goes off at 4 p.m. EDT and a crowd of 20,000 is expected in the stands. The weather forecast is for partly cloudy with a temperature around 90. Delmonica Hanover, piloted by Del Miller, is considered Super Bowl's main threat It will be the first time the filly has gone against colts this year, and Miller said her speed is an unknown factor because he has never had to let her go all out. Kerry Way in 1966 was the last filly to win harness racing's premier stake and only 11 have done it in a 46-year history. Spartan Hanover, whose Billy Haughton seeks his first Hambletonian triumph after winning about everything else in harness racing, has been unable to catch Super Bowl at the wire all year. Spartan has finished second to him eight times. Star's Chip, driven by Stanley's son, Ronnie, is a Dancer Stable entry, and Flush, reined by Glen Garnsey, is a Haughton Stable entry. Rounding out the smallest field since seven went in 1932, are The Black Streak, steered by Howard Beissinger, winner of the Hambletonian last year with Speedy Crown and in 19G9 with Lindy's Pride, and Axystar, a nobody that has finished no better than fourth in six races on the Michigan County Fair route. Axystar, whose best time is 2:12 was entered Sunday on a final eligibility payment of S2.-000 by Dr. Anderson Arbury, a retired 67-year-old orthondontist who owns an angus cattle and harness horse spread near Midland, Mich. The Super Bowl-Star's Chin entry is listed at unofficial odds of 1-2. Spartan Hanover- Flush is 4-1; Delmonica Hanover 5-1; The Black Streak 20-1 and Axystar 100-1. The smaUness of the field makes post positions unimportant. In the blind draw, Axystar got the pole slot. Recreation results AT ALTON CITY LEAGUE FAST PITCH (Nwibiide Park) Lancon 11 (Wp-We-ver). Midtown 1 (LP-HaUord) Roy»U } fWP-R. Slaltuit). Boydj 0 (LP-Godar) United States may have plenty to fear—mainly the thought of an Olympic swimming team without Mark Spitz. The 22-year-old Indiar.i University dent a' student racked U|. his third world record in garnering his third gold of these 20th Summer Games Tuesday, slashing his way to victory in the men's 200-meter freestyle. Then he told a television interviewer that, whether or not he achieves his seven-gold goal, these Games will probably be his last international competition. "I have no plans for swimming any more at nil, really," Spit/, said. "I won't have the Barefoot boy U.S. swimmer Mark Spitz, second from right, of Car- micliael, Calif., stands barefoot as he applauds while bronze medalist Werner Lampe of West Germany is congratulated at the Munich Olympics Tuesday. Behind Spitz is silver medalist Steve Center of Lakewood, Calif. Spitz collected his third gold medal in the men's 200-meter freestyle swimming event and set a new world record in 1:52.78. (AP Wirephoto) Wilkens refuses to move in spat SEATTLE (AP) — Cleveland Cavaliers Coach Bill Fitch reports he had a five hour talk with Lenny Wilkens Tuesday but that the former Seattle SuperSonics coach still hasn't decided whether to report to the Cleveland National Basketball Association team. In fact, Fitch said Wilkens still is considering retiring. Replying to a question during an interview with Seattle television station K I R O , Fitch said the Cougars have 22 under contract CHICACO (AP) - The Chicago Cougars of the new World Hockey Association had 22 players under contract today with the signing of three minor league players. They included winger Wally Sprange, 27, and center Ron Hindson. 27, of Greensboro in the Eastern Hockey League, and wingti Bernie Blanchette, 25, of Kansas City in the Central Hockey League. Sprange scored 74 points for Greensboro last season and in the 1970-71 season, playing for Nashville, led Eastern League scoring with 134 points. Cleveland' team would not consider trading Wilkens to Portland. There have been rumors Wilkens has requested such a trade. "If Wilkens plays next seas o n, it will be wiih Cleveland," said Fitch, who also is director of player personnel for the Cavaliers. Cleveland obtained Wilkets and Barry Clemens in a trade for Butch Beard. If Wilkens retires, the trade will stand. \Vilkens has not yet revealed his future plans. "The trade was a calculated gamble," said Fitch. "The gamble was obtaining a superstar in exchange for a good player who probably will develop into a superstar in tlu- future," he said. Special service MUNICH (AP) - Speral high holiday services for Jewish competitors in the Olympic Games have been arranged at the Olympic Village chapel. Sen-ices are scheduled for the night of Sept. 8 and for the morning of Sept. 9 by the Israeli delegation. No competition involving Israelis is scheduled to last beyond sundown Sept 8 when ihe eight-das religious period for Jews begins. time. I'll swim until Monday." The bronzed, mustachioed Spitz sliced through the water in the 200 freestyle in 1:52.78, unleashing a torpedo-like final lap to shatter his own world mark of 1:53.50 as well as the Olympic standard of 1:55.29 formerly owned by fourth-place finisher Mark Wenden of Australia. Winning the silver was UCLA student Steve Center of Lakewcod, Calif. Werner Lampe of West Germany was third. Spitz, of course, wasn't the only American to do well. The United States already owns 15 medals—five gold, six silver and four bronze. That's six more than runner-up East Germany and eight ahead of the Soviet Union. One of those golds went Tuesday to a California high school student—the Golden State really seems to be living up to its nickname here—in what has to be one of the biggest upsets of the Games thus far. Sandra Neilson, a giggly, dimpled lass from El Monte, Calif., wrecked Australian wizard Shane Gould's bid for four personal golds by winning the women's 100-meter freestyle in an Olympic- record 58.59—less than a tenth of a second off Miss Gould's world mark. "I'm just so excited now I feel great," the 16-year-old Miss Nielson bubbled. "I just wanted to get out there and win it. When I got out there I knew I could do it." But how, she was asked, did she feel about beating the favored Aussie, who had to settle for third behind Shirley Babashoff of Fountain Valley, Calif. "She's a girl-just like us," Miss Nielson said of Miss Gould. Australia's Beveraly Whitfield beat out Dana Schoenfield of Anaheim, Calif., for the gold in the women's 200-meter breaststroke, winning in an Olympic-record 2:41.72, and sensational East German Roland Matthes broke the Games' record by winning the men's 100-meter backstroke in 56.58, followed by Mike Stamm of San Diego and Jerry Murphy of Hinsdale, HI. For Miss Schoenfield, it was a delightful climax to a remarkable comeback. Failing to even qualify for the 1968 Olympics, she gave up training for three years, then decided to take another shot at a spot on the team. The American basketball team, now unbeaten in 58 Olympic games, raised its record to 3-0 with a 67-48 victory over Cuba, a decision that avenged the Yanks' loss to that Caribbean country in last year's Pan-American Games. Tonight the U.S. squad goes against Brazil, also unbeaten in three Group A games Defense did it for the Yanks against Cuba, which managed only one basket in 17 shots from the floor as the U.S. team built a 13-3 lead in the first nine minutes and made it 33-21 by the half. Cuban scoring star Pedro Chappe finished with just four points in the contest and Jim Brewer of the University of Minnesota, who'd been assigned to stop him calmly observed: "Defense is what I enjoy playing most." There was nothing for Reggie Jones to enjoy. The Marine lance corporal from Newark, N.J., after apparently thrashing Valeri Tregubov in their light middleweight bout, lost a judges' split decision to the bloodied Russian, sparking a near-riot in the boxing stadium. "There was a big blur. I closed my eyes," Jones said of the moment of decision, when 5,000 fans screamed their disapproval and hurled garbage at the ring. "I knew this was no dream. I knew I wasn't gonna get a medal. And there was no sense to start anything, to get mad." I n- other competition Tuesday, America's water polo team blitzed Canada 8-1 for its third straight triumph. With just two days left in Group A preliminary matches, the Yanks seem certain to qualify for the finals. Bruce Bradley of Long Beach, Calif., a 1968 Olympics veteran, scored two goals to raise his three-game total to seven. In featherweight weightlifting, Bulgaria's Norair Nurik- yan won the gold with an Olympic-record total lift of 887.35 pounds. J2a2p2a2n won the gold in men's team gymnastics, continuing its string of victories begun in the 1960 Games, the Soviet Union won a gold in the 100-kilometer— 62-mile—cycling and Italy's Angelo Scalzone won the trapshooting gold with a world-record score of 199. * * * * Spitz has a long way to go MUNICH (AP) — Mark Spitz is gunning for seven gold medals in swimming events in this Olympic Games, but even if he gets them he will have a long way to go to match the 17 medals collected by Larisa Latynina of Russia. Miss Latynina won nine gold medals in gymnastics in the 1956, 1960 and 1964 Games. She also took five silver and three bronze. Spitz won two gold medals in relay events, plus one silver and one bronze in individual events in 1968 He has won two individual golds and one relay gold so far this year in Munich. Consolation on mound San Francisco Giants catcher Dave Rader on the mound offering his consolation to pitcher Jim Barr after Barr's try at a no-hitter was broken up in the 7th inning by the St. Louis Cardinals' Bernie Carbo. (AP Wirephoto) Olympic officiating classified terrible MUNICH (AP) - Justice is sometimes a day late at the Olympics. The bad referees are generally excluded from further chances at scorecard lynchings, but it is no solace to the athletes who suffer through their incapabilities or prejudice. The wrestling judge who eliminated U.S. heavyweight Chris Taylor from competition on Sunday will not be allowed to officiate again at this Olympics. Now American boxing officials are saying the governing body of referees will be looking hard at the men who handed defeat to U.S. light middleweight boxer Reggie Jackson on Tuesday when he seemed to have been a clear victor over Valery Tregubov of the Soviet Union. They will not be disciplined, but quietly excluded from further assignments—if sanctions occur. The officiating in basketball is terrible, according to U.S. Coach Hank Iba, and the Ugandan soccer team protested a loss it said was due to a bad referee. The reason is unequal pay and standards for officials around the world. One basketball referee said he got paid $1.10 a game at home and a Korean boxing official forgot how to count in English on a knockdown and lost track of how long the man had been down. Politics plays a role. The officiating assignments are generally made so that men from neutral countries decide the winners in competition between athletes from opposing blocs. But there are serious slips. A Yugoslav judge was the only man to vote for the Russian in his f i g h t against Jones before the Olympic no- tie rule forced two other judges to change their vote. The Jones decision, which led to a 15-minute demonstration and near bottle- 401 W. 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Ill) Wood River 259-4200 AMERICAN LEAGUE East W L Pet GB 67 67 63 64 58 48 West 72 71 60 5ft 55 49 56 56 58 59 65 74 51 51 60 62 67 74 .545 .545 .521 .520 .472 .393 .585 .582 .500 .488 .451 .398 _ _ 3 3 9 181,4 «_ 108 12 IG'/i 23 Baltimore Detroit Boston New York Cleveland Milwaukee Oakland Chicago Minnesota Kansas City California Texas Tuesday's Results New York 7-4, Texas 6-7, 1st game, 11 Innings Boston 3, Chicago 0 Baltimore 9, Minnesota 4 Kansas City 0, Milwaukee 4 Oakland 1, Cleveland 0 California 3, Detroit 1 Wednesday's Gomes Chicago (Wood 22-11) at Boston (McOlothen 5-4) Texas (Stanhouse 2-4) at New York (Gardner 4-2), N Kansas City (Spilttorff 9-10) at Milwaukee (Lonborg 12-7), N Baltimore (Dobson 15-12) at Minnesota (Blyleven 10-15), N Detroit (Fryman 3-1) at California (Wright 14-7), N Cleveland (Perry 1S-13) at Oakland (Odom 11-4), N Thursday's Games Texas at New York Kansas City at Milwaukee, N Detroit at California, N Only sames scheduled Pittsburgh Chicago New York St. Louis Montreal Philadelphia NATIONAL LEAGUE East W L Pet GB 76 46 .623 66 57 .537 10«/4 63 57 .525 12 60 62 .492 16 .463 19V .364 311 56 44 77 West 77 46 .620 — 70 54 .565 7 65 56 .537 11 57 68 .456 21 55 70 .440 23 Cincinnati Houston Los Angeles Atlanta San Francisco San Diego 46 77 .374 31 Tuesday's Results Chicago 2, Los Angeles 1 New York 3, Cincinnati 0 Pittsburgh 5, San Diego 3 Montreal 4, Atlanta 3 Houston 2, Philadelphia 1 San Francisco 3, St. Loula 0 Wednesday's Games Los Angeles (John 11-5) at Chicago (Jenkins 18-10) Montreal (McAnally 2-14) at Atlanta (Niekro 12-10), N San Diego (Arlln 8-17) at Pittsburgh (Kisen 6-5), N New York (Matlack 11*7) at Cincinnati (Gullett 6-7), N Philadelphia (Carlton 21-7) «t Houston (Reuss 8-10). N San Francisco (Willoughby 3-1) tit St. Louis (Gibson 15-7), N Thursday's Games Los Angeles at Chicago Philadelphia at Houston, N Only games scheduled 'Need more discipline. throwing riot in the Olympic Boxing Palace, was described as "a disgrace and a scandal" by former world middleweight champion Nino Benevenuti, now an Italian broadcaster. For Jones, there was only the demented anger of the crowd to comfort him. "This wasn't .the first time or the last somebody got a bad rap," he said. "The only difference was this time it was me." HSRSCH & CO. says MUNICH (AP) - "All kids are hard to coach now days," U.S. Olympic Baksetball Coach Henry Iba says. The 68-year-old Iba, coaching in his third consecutive Olympics, had been asked if younger players — this is the youngest U.S. Olympic team ever — are harder to coach than older athletes. The trouble, he said, lies with "fathers, mothers, school teachers and ministers." "We need more discipline in this country," he said, apparently meaning the United States and not West Germany, host for the 19?2 Olympics. KYANIZE PAINT PIA8A CORNERS ALTON PLAZA WILSH1RE VILLAGE CHATEAU DES FLEURS SHOPPING CENTERS AND DOWNTOWN WOOD RIVER CHUCK DIERING DIERWG'S CORNER Q. With all the hl-Jacklngs going on today, can you tell me what was the longest hl-jacklng to take place? It's "Plane" to see that you'll be carried away with the low, low prices we are now offering on all brand new 1972 Chryslers and Plymouths at Chuck Dlerlng Chrysler-Plymouth. Tremendous savings—Tremendous Trade-In allowances. Try "steering to Dlerlng" wher$ you get more car for your money and more money for your car when you trade. A. The event occurred on Oct. 31 to Nov. 1, 1969, Corporal Raffaele Minichiello hl-Jacked a Boeing 707 between San Francisco and Denver. The plane was on Its way to Rome, Italy via New York, Buogor, Maine, and Shannon. Ireland. The total distance of the hi-Jack was 6900 miles. CHUCK DIERING Chrysler-Plymouth 1100 E. Broadway, Alton 406-5531

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