Postville Herald from Postville, Iowa on January 14, 1948 · Page 7
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January 14, 1948

Postville Herald from Postville, Iowa · Page 7

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Postville, Iowa
Issue Date:
Wednesday, January 14, 1948
Page:
Page 7
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m THE POSTVILLE HERALD. POSTVILLE, IOWA PAGE SEVBN taker doesn't wish Id get .done by it- ibors over the family j^ireek after week. t of her ironing Tannie Gannon, ex- flnanagement special- 'teollege, is the shirt, ibmemaker who has mt the diiffculty of s right has reason lints, for Shirts, that most ordinary are designed too accommodate men's pieces of flat work The wide ironing riuch you can use for iting parages, milk eMf* your home. They are ideal for Ihese purposes. leyer a pour- County Hatchery tone No. 231 >R. H| D. COLE D ||n t i s t Mgibltizens State Bank W. Myers, M. D.| >ver Huebner's ulephones: I Rtof USVW Residence 188-X calve * in tiw *-i ! R. Schneider IINARIAN D Postville, Iowa Theatre Building B. Steele JEY-AT-LAW |Abernethy's Store lone No. 240 Kiesau, M.D. Kiesau, M.D. rais Schutte it Sons 9 to 12 and 1 to 5 iday afternoon*. |t—7 to 1:30 p. m. SCHUTTE SCHUTTE jbtors &,Emb»lmer» For All Occasion! & Palas EYS-AT-LAW Postville 8tate Bank Cle OPSAHL )PRACTOK •r Abenwthy 'i U and 1 U S aya,, Friday! board came about after considerable study had been made of processes for ironing' shirts. It's a single board 20 inches wide by 42 inches long, padded pnd covered just like any ironing board. It can be made of 7/8-inch plywood. When needed, it fits on top of the regular board without any extra fixing or fussing. Its weight holds it in place. The board will easily accommodate a sheet or tablecloth folded down the middle, and there won't be half the re-arranging that is required on the narrower board. The iron can be directed in long strokes which cover a wide surface rapidly. As for shirts, the wide board method eliminates extra motions. There is less chance of wrinkling the shirt, for you move the garment only three times if you follow the recommended method. Also you set the iron down and pick it up fewer times. Directions for the correct method to iron a shirt may he obtained from Miss Gannon's office. Using the wide ironing board, Miss Gannon says, is just one idea to make .ironing day easier. What good does it do a homemaker, she asks, to buy a new 1,000 watt iron or invest in a new modern washer, if she wears herself out ironing- in the same old way she's used for years? Sit Down at Work. The answer, so home management experts say, is to take ironing day "sitting down." The new adjustable ironing board, the propped up basket of clothes at proper height, the handy drying rack and comfortable chair are all a part of the scheme to avoid fatigue. Most women don't realize it, but they've been going to a lot of extra effort just ironing. The wide ironing board cuts down on the ironing time by 15 percent. For some homemakers, who contend with large baskets of clothes, 7 hours of ironing is not unusual. Even one hour saved is a big help. Some new ironing boards on the market have as many as five heights. Just, a flip of the control mechanism underneath and the board moves to a new low level so that you can sit comfortably while working. The proper chair is one which closely resembles the good office chair. It adjusts to different heights and has swivel casters and a swivel seat. In fact, this ( type of chair is a dandy for use in the kitchen. All of these "save energy" ideas for ironing are on display with the Iowa Farm and Home Labor Saving Show now touring the state. The show is sponsored by the Agricultural Extension Service of Iowa State College. NOTICE OF INCORPORATION Notice is hereby given of the foimation of a corporation for pe- runiarv profit under Chapter 491 of the 1948 Code of IoWa, and acts amendatory thereto, to be known as FALB MOTOR AND IMPLEMENT, with principal place of business at Postville, Allamakee County, Iowa. The general nature of the business to be transacted by the corporation is to buy, own, sell, service, repair, store, care for, manufacture, assemble, rebuild: and generally deal in, at wholesale or retail, both new and used automobiles, trucks and motor vehicles of all kinds, farm implements, machinery, vehicles, tools, and any and all articles pertaining to agriculture, and tires and accessories, including parts and supplies of all kinds pertaining thereto; to lease, build, purchase or otherwise acquire, and operate, buildings, storage houses and garages for the purpose of carrying on the business of the corporation," and storing, and caring for therein of automobiles, trucks and motor vehicles of all kinds, farm implements, machinery, vehicles, tools, and any and all articles pertaining to agriculture, and supplies therefor and appurtenances thereto; to buy, own, sell and deal in all goods, wares and merchandise necessary or incidental to the operation, repair or equipment of automobiles, trucks and motor vehicles of all kinds, farm implements, machinery, vehicles, tools, and any and all articles pertaining to agriculture; to buy, own, sell and deal in all devices and appliances of every nature, kind and description whatsoever, including parts and supplies pertaining thereto; to act as dealer, sales representative; agent or broker for manufacturers of automobiles, trucks and motor vehicles of all kinds, farm implements, machinery, vehicles, tools, and any and all articles pertaining to agriculture, devices, appliances, and supplies there­ for and appurtenances thereto,. of every nature, kind and description whatsoever; to purchase, lease, own, improve, maintain, convey, sell, exchange and mortgage, pledge or otherwise dispose of any and all real and personal property or any interest therein necessary, useful or appropriate to enable the corporation to accomplish any or all of its purposes; and generally, to make contracts, acquire and transfer property, both real and personal, the •same as natural persons enjoy. Authorized capital stock is One Hundred and Twenty Thousand Dollars ($120,000.00) common stock divided into twelve hundred shares of the par value of One Hundred Dollars ($100,00) per share, to be issued as the Board of Directors may determine, all of which stock when issued to be paid for fully in either money or property and to be non-assessable as provided by law. The corporation to beEin business January 1, 1948, the date certificate was issued by the Secretary of State, and continue for a period of twenty years therefrom, with the right of renewal as provided by law, unless sooner dissolved by a two-thirds (%) vote of the stockholders at any annual meeting, or at a special meeting called for that purpose, or by unanimous consent as provided by law. Its affairs to be conducted by a board of directors of not less than two nor more than five persons selected from among the common stockholders, with power to establish by-laws and fill vacancies, said directors to be chosen annually by the stockholders at the annual stockholders,' meeting to be held on the first Monday of February of each year. The Board of Directors shall elect a President, two Vice Presidents, Secretary, and Treasurer, and any two offices »may be held by the same person at the same time, excepting the offices of president and vice president. The said officers shall be elected by the Board of Directors from their membership each year immediately following the election of directors by the stockholders at the annual stockholders' meeting. Until the first annual meeting in 1948. the following named persons shall be directors of this corporation: John Falb, Elgin, Iowa; W. C. Falb, Elgin, Iowa; G. H. Falb, Elgin, Iowa; and John Falb, Jr., Postville, Iowa; Until the first annual meeting in 1948, the following persons shall be officers of this corporation: John Falb, President: W. C. Falb, Vice President: G. H. Falb, Vice President; and John Falb, Jr., Secretary and Treasurer. The private property of the stockholders of this corporation shall be exempt from the debts or liabilities of the corporation. Dated at Postville, Iowa, January 2, 1948. FALB MOTOR AND IMPLEMENT By John Falb, President. John Falb, Jr., Secretary. Joseph B. Steele, P. O. Address: Postville, Iowa Attorney for the Corporation. ATTENTION FARMERS! Until Further Notice We Will Pay Up To $20 FOR DEAD HORSES and COWS (HIDES MUST BE GOOD) And Your Assurance of— * Prompt Service on All Small Animals * Free Gifts for Small Animals * Sanitary Removal * 24 Hour Service * Tankage for Sale to Farmers * We Pay AU Phone Charges For Prompt Rendering: Service, Call ALLAMAKEE COUNTY RENDERING SERVICE Postville—Phone 555 — or — COLE RENDERING SERVICE Waukon, Iowa—Phone 600 LICENSE NO. 36 CREDIT CURB WILL CHECK INFLATION The tip-off on whether the government really means business in its coming inflation control legislation will depend on what it does about curbing credit buying and reducting the flow of new money into the,economy. Francis Kutish, Iowa State College farm economist, points out that price controls, currently being considered as an inflationary control, deal with the symptoms—not the heart of the inflation problem. The real trouble is that dollars have been piling up in the country faster than material goods. So prices rose. The way to stop the spiral, says Kutish, is to cut down the supply of "incoming money through curbs on bank loans and consumer easy- payment buying. Holding taxes at their present level is another way of keeping money tied up and unusable for added purchasing. So, for the tip-off on how much effective inflation control we are to get—watch what the government does, Kutish tells Iowa farmers. Will price controls be slapped on; or will a true inflation throttle be put on credit expansion? Try through a Herald Want Ad. PROOF OF WILL. To All Whom It May Concern: Notice is hereby given that an Instrument purporting to be the last Will and Testament of William Moll, Deceased, late of Allamakee County, Iowa, has been opened and read in, the office of the Clerk of District Court of Iowa, in and for Allamakee County, and that Feb- MUSIC FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY! KENNY HOFER — and his — MID-WESTERNERS Sat., Jan. 17 LAKESIDE Guttenberg, Iowa ruary 2nd, 1948, has been set for hearing the proof of said -Will in said Court. WITNESS my hand and the (SEAL) seal of said Court this 5th day of January, 1948. O. H. FOSSUM, Clerk of District Court. By: Lloyd R. Kolsrud, Deputy; Attorneys for the Estate: Burling & Palas, Postville, la. After calves start eating grain, feed only what they will clean up. Remove the left-over grain each day, and put fresh grain in the feed bunks. Highest CASH Prices For Your Dead Stock CHARGE ALL CALLS TO US Postville Rendering Co. TELEPHONE NO. 1000 WAUKON—Call Sunderman City Service—Telephone No. 242 McGREGOR—Call Dresden Standard Service—Telephone No. 55-J OSSIAN—Call D-X Service Station—Telephone No. 90 ELGIN—Call D-X Service Station—Telephone No. 2111 MONONA—Call Mr. Zlegler—Telephone No. 208 ROSSVILLE—Call Rossville Locker Plant SALE Having decided to quit farming, I will sell at Public Auction on the premises, located 3V 2 miles west of Postville and 2 l / 2 miles- east of Castalia on paved U. S. Highway No. 52, on THURSDY. JANUARY 22 Sale to start at 12:30 o'clock p. m. There will be a Lunch Stand on the grounds sponsored by the Castalia Lutheran Ladies Aid. 13 Head of Cattle 10 HOLSTEINS 3 BROWN SWISS Consisting of 7 Fresh Cows; 3 Cows to freshen soon, and 3 Bred Heifers. 2 Head of Work Horses 2 Black Mares, 14 years old; weight 1400 pounds each. 100 YEARLING CROSS-BRED HENS 175 WHITE LEGHORN PULLETS Corn, Oats, and Loose and Baled Hay About 600 bu. New Corn; about 100 bu. New Tama Oats; about 100 bu. Old Boone Oats; about 12 tons Clover Hay in barn; 240 bales Clover Hay in barn. Farming Machinery and Equipment 32-ft. Owatonna Elevator, with Wisconsin Motor; 7-ft. Deering Grain Binder; a John Deere Web Hay Loader; John Deere Hay Rake; McCormick-Deering Manure Spreader; Deering Hay Mower, with extra sickles; McCormick-Deering Corn Binder; 7-ft. Osborne Disc; 7-ft. Van Brunt Seeder; 2 14-in. Moline Tractor Plow; Riding Corn Plow; Walking Corn Plow; John Deere Corn Planter, with 100 rods of wire; 3-section Steel Drag, nearly new; 3-section Quack Digger; 2 wide tired Wagons; Bobsled; Wood Rack; Hay Rack; Wagon Box; 2-wheel Trailer with a Stock Rack; 8-in. Stover Feed Mill and belt; Racine Fanning Mill, with screens; 14-in. Walking Stubble Plow; Feed Cooker; Wood Saw; 10x14 ft. Round Roof Brooder House; Buckeye Oil Brooder Stove; Chicken Feeders and Fountains; a Power Lawn Mower; DeLaval No. 17 Cream Separator; 5 10-gal. Cream Cans; Pails; Strainer; Circulating Heater; Oil Barrels and Barrel Pump; Electric Fencer; Briggs & Stratton Engines; (J-in. Blacksmith Vise; Block and Tackle; 2 Sets »| Heavy Work Harness; Fly Nets; Hay Slings; Milk Cart; Grain Sacks; Shovels and 1 Forks; Hog Troughs* and many other articles too numerous to mention. HOUSEHOLD GOODS—Iron Bed and Springs; Wardrobe; Glass Cupboard; 6- volt Battery Radio; Davenport; Gas Iron; Lanterns and other items. Usual Public Sale Terms. If credit is desired arrange with Clerk before sale. HENRY KOEN1G, Prop. EATON WATERS, Auctioneer CITIZENS STATE BANK, Clerk Jm

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