Alton Evening Telegraph from Alton, Illinois on August 22, 1972 · Page 6
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August 22, 1972

Alton Evening Telegraph from Alton, Illinois · Page 6

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Alton, Illinois
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Tuesday, August 22, 1972
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Page 6
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-8 Alton Evening Telegraph Tuesday, August 22,1972 McGovern in state, will meet Daley; Dems friendlier By MICHAEL K. ROBINSON DECATUR, 111. (AP) - The Initial coolness toward Uio candidacy of George S. McGovern by Illinois Democratic party regulars may be mellowing. Virtually every Democratic leader in Decatur and 2.000 other persons came to the city airport Monday night to shake hands with the party's presidential candidate and hear him attack America's involvement in Vietnam, electronic eavesdropping in political campaigns and tax loopholes for the rich. Whether the local parly officials came out of enthusiasm for McGovern's candidacy or just to shake a few hands on behalf of themselves was not quite clear. "Anytime you can get three or more people standing in one spot, you can get us out," a member of the Legislature said. But come they did. and McGovern will get a chance to solidify his support from Mayor Richard .T. Daley on a scheduled stop in Chicago Wednesday. At a news conference earlier Monday, Daley predicted McGovern will carry the state. Among those at the airport rally were State Sen. Robert McCarthy of Decatur as well as State Reps. John Alsup of Decatur and Holland Tipsword of Taylorville. Perhaps more meaningful was the presence of such labor officials as William Mathews of United Auto Workers Local 751; Boyd Shinn, regional director of the Allied Industrial Workers Union, and Mason Parker of the United Rubber Workers. Party officials included Leo Fitzgerald, state central committeeman from Springfield; Penny Sevems, national committeewoman of Decatur, and Hallie Bafford, Macon County chairman. McGovern deplaned from his charter jet with congressional candidate Larry Johnson of Champaign. The presidential hopeful wore a Johnson for Congress button in his lapel. The presidential candidate strolled along a wire fence shaking hands with businessmen in conservative suits, farmers in overalls and persons with beards and knapsacks. A few anti-McGovern signs bobbed up at the rear of the crowd, one a large banner reading, "Surrender Now." Although ho continued to criticize the U.S. presence in Vietnam. McGovern denied at' greater length than usual that he would jeopardize America's defenses. "As a bomber pilot in World War II, 1 learned that this country has to be militarily strong," he said. "I would never do anything that would jeopardize the defenses of this country." How much support McGovern can get from Daley was described as a question mark by some Democrats on hand. The Chicago mayor canceled plans to meet the senator at the Illinois State Fair last week. Relations between the McGovern and Daley camps have been tenuous since 59 proMcGovern delegates led by Chicago Alderman William Singer replaced the mayor's slate at the Democratic National Convention. ; But Daley denied speculation the meeting was canceled because he was angry at McGovern. Daley said the South Dakotan is "coming from behind, putting on that spurt" and added the 1972 campaign already has been more effective than that of Hubert H. Humphrey's four years ago. On McGovem's chances downstate, party leaders questioned at the Decatur tally were uncertain. "From Democrats, especially the ones who work in every election, you hear less and less against McGovern," Tipsword said. "The tide is dfinitely flowing in his favor, but whether it's flowing strong enough and fast enough, I don't know." Ogilvie signs bill which will aid handicapped SPRINGFIELD, 111. (AP) A program to provide state support for education of severely handicapped children has been expanded by newly approved legislation to meet cases where public facilities are lacking. Gov. Richard B. Ogilvie signed bills Monday to put public funds behind the Final lunar landing set for Dec. 11 By VERN IIAUGLANI) WASHINGTON (AP) American astronauts arc scheduled to make their lust lunar landing in the Apo'.lo series of space flight exploration on Dec. 11, the space agency says. It will be the sixth moon visit by man and will also represent the longest say yet on the moon's surface. And it will be the first night launching of a manned spacecraft. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration said Monday the evening launch hour was scheduled to make possible a lunar landing at the desired sun angle just south of the moon's Taurus mountains and Littrow crater. Taurus-Littrow, a coin bination of mountain-dotted highlands and valley-strewn lowlands, was labeled by NASA as a keystone site <o fill in major gaps in the developing model of the moon. The site was selected on the basis of Apollo n orbital photography and !n the recommendation of Apollo 15 astronaut Alfred M. Worden. The Saturn V rocket ;s scheduled to blast off from Cape Kennedy, Fla., at 9'53 p.m. KST Dtc. «. The lunar landing is scheduled for ?:o5 p.m. EST, Dec. 11. education of children too severely handicapped to qualify for a public school education. The funds would support education in private facilities. During the past three years, Ogilvie said. related legislation had extended the right to a public education for p r e s c h o o' 1 handicapped children. The laws had increased the level of state funding for special education programs. Loot valued at ,229 stolen from Jersey home Goldivater introduced Sen. Barry Goldwater of Arizona, introduced to the Republican National Convention by California Gov. Ronald Reagan, left, as "the man who would rather be right than be President," waves to delegates at Monday night's session. (AV Wirephoto) Misery, suffering, bravery as Far East floods continue By JOHN RODERICK TOKYO (AP) — Filipino villagers carrying lighted candles waded waist-deep in swirling flood waters, praying for divine help. In Japan, a one-year-old baby was dug from the mud, chortling and unhurt. A 12-story luxury apartment house in Hong Kong collapsed under the pounding of thousands of tons of rain- weakened earth. A British attorney, pinned in the debris, calmly difected rescue workers. In South Korea, U.S. Army and Air Force helicopters and trucks helped save the lives of more than 3,400 people in flooded cities. Scenes of misery, suffering and bravery were commonplace in much of the Far East this wet summer as torrential rains touched off floods and landslides' that destroyed hundreds of thousands of dwellings. By today the death toll had reached 1,384. Damage mounted into the hundreds of millions of dollars. The poverty or modest circumstances of most of the victims living in low-lying areas or hillside squatter villages kept it from being much higher. Four areas were hit hardest: the Philippines, with 454 dead; South Korea, 398 dead and 130 missing; Japan, 370 dead, 67 missing; and Hong Kong, 162 dead. Heavy rains also pounded China, flooding Peking, but no figures were available on casualties or damage. Monsoons are the prevailing winds in East Asia that bring up to half a year of wet weather. Typhoons are the vast wind and rainstorms that lash the western Pacific during the summer and autumn. Born' in the area near Guam, they sometimes reach 150 miles an hour and GUTTER SALE • Eliminate Paint Peeling With Baked Enamel Aluminum f> Maintenance Free For 20 Years • Professional Installation $149 ", INSTALLED GERSMAN & COMPANY Our 22nd Year in Alton 2813 K. Broadway 465^67 I I VOTE YES t ^7\ ibrary IMPROVEMENT FOR EVERYONE W AUGUST 22 may cover an area half the size of the United States. There are as many as 35 each year. This year's rains began taking their toll in mid-June, triggering disastrous landslides in the British colony of Hong Kong, where many of the 5 million inhabitants live on steep hillsides. The rain totaled more than 60 inches in three days, the heaviest in Hong Kong's history. Landslides buried 78 squatters' huts in Kowloon, on the mainland, the usual aftermath of a heavy rain in Hong Kong. But this time Victoria Peak, the home of the rich on Hong Kong Island, was also hit. A new building near the top collapsed, setting off a chain- reaction slide of mud and structures in which four buildings were brought down. Henry Litton, a leading attorney, was found alive in the rubble, one foot pinned by a heavy beam. Chatting calmly with his rescuers, he drink water and ate food while a buzz saw set him free. Nearly 5,000 other homes had to be evacuated. For two weeks in July, the rains bore down on Japan. An irrigation canal overflowed with a roar in the middle of the night, crushing the home of the Matsumoto family and burying one-year- old Kazumi and two of his grandparents. Another grandparent groped in the mud and felt something soft. It was Kazumi, crying as he was pulled free, then laughing. The Construction Ministry estimated that the rains, which struck Southwest Japan hardest, caused $472 million in property damage. In the Philippines, a month of rains ravaged 13 provinces on Luzon Island and set back the economy at least two or three years, government economists said. Damage to crops and property was estimated at more 'than'$450 million while the cost in human suffering was incalculable. People stranded on rooftops fought for food dropped from U.S. Ail- Force helicopters. Babies died because they could not eat the high-nutrient buns that were one of the chief relief food items. JERSEYVILLE - Items valued at $2,229 were taken from a rural Grafton home during the weekend in one of five separate burglaries reported to the sheriff's department. The loot at the Frank Trulaske home on Rte. 1, Grafton, included several sections of draperies valued at $1,000 as well as electrical appliances and men's clothing. Entry was made sometime between 7:30 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. Sunday by breaking a hole in the window glass to allow the burglar to reach in and open it, police said. A mini bike and a trail bike valued at $250 were stolen from the Truman Dabbs home on Rte. 1, Grafton sometime Sunday night. Cecil Hargis of 808 Union St. in Alton told police that vandals had damaged his clubhouse on Rte. 3, Jerseyville, to the extent of $2,500. Windows in the clubhouse had been broken out, holes chopped in the door with an ax and the entire premises ransacked, he said, between June of this year and Saturday. Papers and coffee had been scattered about, the heating stove overturned and papers had been burned on the porch, police said. A shed on the premises had been vandalized and extensively damaged along with the contents. Three boats at Piasa Harbor were burglarized last week, police said, with loot taken in one of the incidents, was valued at $19. Theft of a set of diamond rings valued at $150 from the Jack Huett residence at Medora was reported to police Saturday. The rings were believed taken either Wednesday or Thursday of last week, Huett said. The right rear window of a car owned by a University City, Mo., man was broken out while it was parked at the park over the weekend , police said. Sen. Robert Griffin of Michigan pauses to pay his respects to Alf Landon, the Republican presidential candidate in 1936, at the OOP National Convention Monday night when Landon was honored in a speech by Sen. Hugh Scott of Pennsylvania and by a filmed tribute. (AP Wirephoto) Holiday Shores sewer district L&C Foundation favors election Se P*Camp Dubois site project Support for development of the old Camp Dubois site, where the Lewis and Glark Expedition camped prior to the famous journey up the Missouri River, was voiced recently at the national meeting of the Lewis & Clark Trail Heritage Foundation, Inc. Camp DuBois're construction was one of four projects supported in resolutions approved by the meeting, held in Helena, Mont., Aug. 9-11. The others were the further development of the entire trail under the National Trails System Act, legislation to preserve the Missouri River Breaks and Beaverhead Rock in Montana. Clarence Decker, East Alton restaurant owner and Illinois' only representative to the conference, was unable to attend because of illness. New officers elected were Lynn Burris Jr., of Topeka, Kansas, as President; Robert E. Lange of Portland, Ore., as Vice-President; G. Edward Budde of St. Louis as Secretary; and Joseph Jaeger Jr., of Jefferson City, Mo., as Treasurer. Jaeger was reelected to his post. The 1973 meeting will be held in St. Louis, probably in August, with details to be announced later. EDWARDSVILLE - Under a circuit court order on file Monday, an election has been called for Sept. 19 to create a sanitary district for the Holiday Shores area north of here. The order designating the single polling place as I he Lester Klenke residence, Lot 867, Holiday shores Subdivision No. 5, located at the intersection of Holiday Point Parkway and the New Prairietown Road, directed that the polls be open from 6 a.m. until 6 p.m. The petition for an election on creation of the proposed sanitary district for the area was filed May 18 in the municipal corporation division of circuit court. The order calling for the election was signed by three circuit judges, Chief Circuit Judge Michael Kinney and Judges James 0. Monroe and I. H. Streeper. J & ASpringman COMBINATION SCREEN-STORM DOORS ADULT EVENING SCHOOL ALTON SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL REGISTRATION — IN PERSON SEPTEMBER 5-8 BY MAIL —ANYTIME BEFORE SEPTEMBER 8 FEES: Basic fee for 15 weeks (45 hours) is $12.00 Cost shown includes materials and books when required Classes begin the week of September 18,1972 All Classes Meet from 7-10 p.m. For IS Weeks unless otherwise Noted. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CALL 462-0093 SUBJECT PAY COST SUBJECT DAY BUSINESS EDUCATION "Business Machines W or TH *Shortluuid I T "Shorthand II M "Typing: I W "Interni. Typing M "Typing II T "Accounting I M "Bus. Eng. & Letter Writing T "Retailing-Selling- Merchaiidising TH S15.00 317.50 $18.00 S 18.00 $18.35 SI 3.50 $17.50 $17.00 4 13.50 G.K.D. Review (Eng. & Spell.) (6:30-8 pan.) W G.K.O. Review (Math) (8-9:30 pan.) W ART "Painting & Draw. T or W "Pottery I or II W v HOMtt ECONOMICS "Clothing I "Clothing II M or T "(nothing III W Calte, Decorating I W Cake Decorating II TH "Interior Decorating TH Slip Covers & Draperies T Lingerie Const. (8 wks.) M Draperies (u wks.) T "Tailoring TH ACADEMIC M.T.W, or TH S15.00 $12.00 $12.00 "Basic Drawing Fund. T PERSONAL IMPROVEMENT & RECREATION W *H.S. History W "Civics \V "Practical Kiiglish TH English tor Foreign Born T "American Reviewed literature W •World History W "Psychology M "Applied Physics M "Chemistry T "Family Health Care TH "General Math M •'Spanish I T "College Prep English M 'French M "Russian TH "Improving Interpersonal Relationships TH •'Basic Biology M "Develop. Speed Heading T U.E.D. Review (Const. A. S.S.) (6:30-8 p.m.) M G.K.D. Hievcw (Read. Compre.) (S-a:3l> p.m.) M $13.00 $13.00 $12.00 $ 7.00 $ 7.00 $12.00 C1 , . n *"•" * 12.00 $13.00 $13.00 S13.50 $12.00 418.00 SB.51) .1,13.00 ili.aO $JJ.OO $12.00 $12.00 $12.00 $16.00 $12.00 S 6.00 $ U-UO Know Your Auto (Women) Much. Shop — Hobbyists TH TRADE PREPARATORV "Woodwork T Upholstery M or TH "Mechanical Drawing M "Basic Auto. Maint. T "Small Engines M or W "Welding T "Printing W *Intr. Machine Shop T "Homo Electricity T Lawn Maint. (4 wks.) M & W "Adv. Metal Work TH Floral Design I TH M & W TH TRADE CLASSES Blueprint Read & Math I Blueprint Read. & Math T Machine. Shop Practice I T Direct Current Fund. TH Elec. Blueprint Read. — Residential W Trade Welding I M Trade Welding HI W Trade Printing W Hairstyliiig for Licensed Beauticians (7 wks.) (6-10) T Psychology for L.P.N. (10 Weeks) M Administrations of Medications for L.P.N. T Auto Appreii. (20 wks.) (6:30-10:30 p.m.) M & W Numerical Control I M & W COST 9 6.00 $ fi.OO $13.00 S16.00 $14.00 $35.00 $12.00 .'$12.00 $12.00 $12.00 $12.00 $14.50 $16.50 $38.00 $12.00 $12.00 $15.50 $ 0.00 $12.00 §12.00 $14.25 $12.00 $12.00 $19.00 S17.00 $30.00 $30.00 $12.00 $14.00 $10.00 $12.08 $21.50 An (-) indicates the course may. be taken for high school credit. 2606 State 466-5588 FBBLERS • . ^- r - J ~ *~ EDWARDSVILLE II N. 2nd 656-7006 21 YEARS I I Of SERVICE WANTED! PEOPLE WHO REALLY WANT TO SAVE MONEY WHEN PURCHASING A QUALITY GAS RANGE SAVE During Our Sale of Sales HARDWICK NEW AUTOMATIC CONVENIENCE You won't believe what a breeze it is to prepare the family meals . . . day in, day out ... on a new modern Hardwick range. Quick, clean, cool top of the range cooking ... even-heat oven for perfect baking ... and easiest cleaning ever. HARDWICK PRICES BEGIN AT 20" Apt. Si»e w Cu*h & Carry FBBLERS JU Home Of Cash & Catty ancet /t's Like Buying Wholesale

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