Carrol Daily Times Herald from Carroll, Iowa on September 4, 1959 · Page 6
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September 4, 1959

Carrol Daily Times Herald from Carroll, Iowa · Page 6

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Location:
Carroll, Iowa
Issue Date:
Friday, September 4, 1959
Page:
Page 6
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Page 6 article text (OCR)

-Junior Editors Quiz on- INVENTIONS SWEETIIPiE By Nadine Seltxer QUESTION: Who invented the umbrella? ANSWER: Surprisingly, the first umbrellas had nothing to do with protecting their owners from rain. "Umbrella" comes from the Latin "umbra," meaning "shade." The first umbrellas were simply sunshades, invented in the hot, sunny countries of ancient Ninevah and Egypt, hundreds of years before the coming of Christ. As our drawing shows, umbrellas were used to keep the sun from the heads of kings and other important people. Both Greeks and Romans used umbrellas, and they became popular throughout Italy. By 1650 umbrellas began to appear in England, and the people in that damp, rainy country soon found out the modern use of the umbrella—to protect oneself from rain. Early umbrellas were crude, clumsy things, having ribs of whalebone or cane. In 1892, Samuel Fox perfected the umbrella as we know it, with ribs made of light steel rolled into a U-section, which gives great flexibility and strength. FOR YOU TO DO: Our drawing will be fun to color. The ancient part should have a brilliant blue sky, against which red, yellow and orange colors will give the effect of sunshine. In the modern part use light blue and gray so that it will seem to rain. (The $10 award for this question goes to Joanna Cevada of Taunton, Mass. Mail your question on a postcard to Violet Moore Higgins, AP Newsfeatures, in care of this newspaper. If duplicate questions are received, Mrs, Higgins will select the winner.) CARNIVAL By Dick Turner "I realize my job is to build character, but it takes money to build WINNING onesl" SIDE GLANCES By Galbrairh "Someday this farm will be yours, my boy, and you can't call hogs with a trumpjetl" BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES T.M. Rig. U.S. P«t. Off. 1919 by NEA S«,W. Inc. OUT OUR WAY BY J. R. WILLIAMS 'Think of the money he saves on combs!" TIZZY By Kate Osann 1959 by NEA Sfftict. T .M. RIB. U .S. Pit. OH. 9-4 "I really didn't appreciate Wilmot's attentions until I saw how jealous Sandra is!" So They Say Answer to Previous Puzzle ACROSS 1 for compliments 5 Can't get to first 9 Balaam and his 12 Tune (music) 13 Wing-shaped 14 American writer 15 Senile 17 Small child 18 Show contempt 19 Stone Age tool '21 and sound 23 Die (slang) 24 Pronoun 27 Faro card 29 Musical instrument 1 32 Kitchen tool 134 Invader 36 Sharp reply 37 Hemingway 38 . and far 39 Vocalized 41 Enclosure 42 One who (suffix) 44 Praise 46 nuisance 49 Weird 53 Fermented liquor 54 Dislikes 56 Not up to 57 Jumping stick 58 Printing direction 59 Entity 60 Snicker . 61 — off, in golf DOWN 1 Passing fancies 2 • men and wooden ships 3 Position 4 Inferno 5 sinister ' 6 Straightened 7 Mentally sound 8 Rye fungus 9 Native abilities 10 Smoke residue 11 Son of Adam 16 Rubber 20 Classical language 22 Defended places 24 Cornu 25 Fencing sword 26 Keepers 28 Amphitheater 30 Save the -— for last 31 Affectedly aesthetic 33 Scandinavian 35 Debates 40 Claim 43 Goods (coll.) 45 Believer in God 46 Yawn 47 Dash 48 English river 50 Repetition 51 Arrow poison 52 Suffixes 55 Stripes in mahogany Perturbed BY EDGAR MARTIN NStt? V £ x e> iUSV Pfc^ysft ^Ic, *TVWE\ OUR BOARDING HOUSE . . . with . . . MAJOR HOOPLI WW NO AMD BVCR^VlPT g$H0E-\ ONCE- NIGHT 11 PHONED THE T ^^L zoo PEOPLE- AND THEY'RE^ -'^ ; ' ENOUSH ' COMlN' TO GET HIM WM%%m %^im NO V *mA MARAUDINGS OOT GOOD NESVS PERyoU 'l THANK ^//%B RUT& vVAS 1 THAT PEAR I WASTELLi^'te^J/' t AST Nk3MT/ M& . ~.. HAD xf LOOtfEDl STOLE OUR SUPPER f AND NEARLY CAUSED MY DEATH OP PNEUMONIA/ ONLY MV RUGGED CONSTITUTIONS .CONFOUND IT, I'M (SOING TO. .SNEEZE/ WANT A LOOK AT „ HIM it BUGS BUNNY Sign Painter BY AL VERMEER HAMLIN BY DICK CAVALLI 1 CAPTAIN EASY Just Curious BY LESLIE TURNER YOU SHOULP'VB MARRIEP TH' BLIGHTER V ISN'T IT V HE ASKEP YOU, YEARS A60! IP THRIUIMSIV !2! i ' rb GO'NO TO THAT PART"*! VOU'P PMAl IKI TWO ^ ' * PTTPB M, ° " DAYS EASY WILL •, » ^ « . ^ SHANPUiTHE FAMOUS HYPNOTIST, WILL BE THERE. I MAY FINP OUT HOW IT FEELS TO &E HYPNOTIZED' I HAP A DATE GO UPON A STAfiETO FINP OUT, TOO. H& MAPE A SL00MINJ' SPECTACLE OP HI*SBLF1 ONCE. I THOUGHT HE WAS GONNA STRIP CLEAR, POWN T0JHE RIWOl APTERWARD5, HE SAID HE KNEW WOT HE WAS P0IN', BUT COULPN'T SEEM ~(J0 STOP TILL HE WAS TQLP TOl I P0UBT IP N I C0ULP BE- HYPNOTIZEDl m JUST CURIOUS'

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