Alton Evening Telegraph from Alton, Illinois on July 30, 1963 · Page 1
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July 30, 1963

Alton Evening Telegraph from Alton, Illinois · Page 1

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Alton, Illinois
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Tuesday, July 30, 1963
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ttisltlcs HJfflW? 1 :•,•.';:': Ittl S OBtTUAfiV.,< ..... PAOE 7 TELEVISION . . . , . PAOE 8 SPO: tS . r PAOE 19 CLASSIFIED . . , . . PAOE H MARKETS ..it... PAOE If COMICS . . . . . i . PAOE U ALTON EVENING Serving the Alton Community for More Than 12? Years FA1K \VtQDNKSbAV Low tft, Jll«h 02 Established 15, 1836, • Vol. , No, 16? ALTON, ILL., TUESDAY, JULY 30, 1963 14 PAGES 7c Per Copy Member of The Associated Press. Will Fight to Keep Zoning EDWARDSVILLE—A citizens' planning committee of residents, civic leaders and businessmen throughout Madison County, will meet here Thursday to plan a course of action to defeat efforts to repeal the Madison County zoning ordinance. The citizen's group with repre senlatlves from the Alton-Wood River area will outline a plan to defend the zoning measure from an attack by die-hard opponents of the ordinance affecting unincorporated areas of the county. Colllnsvllle Attorney Mathew L. Welch, president of the citizens' planning organization, said today the meeting Is scheduled for 12:15 p.m. at Rusty's restaurant. A showdown vole on a resolution aimed at abolishing the five-month-old zoning measure at a meeting of the County Board of Supervisors July 17 was averted when the sponsor of the resolution withdrew his motion for suspension of the rule that would have brought the measure to the floor for a vote. The repealer resolution was referred to the Zoning and Subdivision Control Committee of the county board for study. The committee's report, expected to be submitted to the board at next month's meeting, would afford all board members an opportunity to vote for or against revocation of the zoning ordinance. "We have supported the county zoning proposal from the very beginning and our organization will meet in Edwardsville to plan action against repeal of the ordinance" the citizens planning committee president told the Telegraph today. The organization was formed over six years ago to discuss and assist in the development planning in the county. of SIBA-Union Talks Poised Near Strike Negotiations today and tomorrow with some area building trade crafts unions could "pretty much tell the story, of whether or not there will be a strike, the president of the Southern Illinois Builders'Assn. said today. Richard Rook of R & R Construction Co., SIBA president, told the Telegraph that, until these negotiation sessions are completed, he would hesitate to say whether a strike appears imminent. ,Both sessions in the U. S. Mediation and Conciliation Service offices in St. Louis, with the ironworkers at 10 a.m. today and the carpenters at 10 a.m. Wednesday, are likely to be all day meetings, Rook said. The contracts of the Carpenters, Ironworkers and Cement Masons unions expire at midnight Wednesday. As of today, a meeting with the cement workers had not been set, it was learned. Harold Gangnath of the SIBA said the unions have been offered the same'contract which the Laborers Union, Plasterers Unions and some Hodcarriers Unions accepted previously. This includes a 30 cents an hour wage increase over three years, with 15 cents effective this year, 15 cents next August and no increase the following year. Carpenters, ironworkers and plasterers are seeking an increase of 60 cents an hour over a three- year period. Wages have been termed the principal Issue in the contract dispute. Union Chief Says Rails Want Law WASHINGTON (AP) — A union leader accused the nation's railroads today of using brink-of- strike tactics to pcess for bom- pulsory arbitration to settle the rails Work rules dispute. H. E. Gilbert, president of the Brotherhood of Enginemen and Firemen, testified • before the House Commerce Committee. Five on-irain unions have said they will strike if new work rules, which would slice crews on freight and yard runs, are imposed by the industry. The railroad deadline for posting of the new rules is 12:01 a.m. Aug. 29. Gilbert spoke in opposition to President Kennedy's proposal the controversy be turned over to the Interstate Commerce Commission for the next two years. He said that would be compulsory arbitration, pointing towarc the end of "that kind of bargain ing which has become a part oj our system of free enterprise." Gilbert said "the only solution to this case is to be found in collective bargaining—collective bargaining which has had a shot in the arm." He said Congress can provide that booster shot. He added both sides should bargain with the knowledge that "the heavy hand of congressional power is ready to punish a party failing to meet his public and private responsibilities during nego- stations." Senators working for a settlement say they are encouraged by a union official's announcement that the brotherhoods have submitted a new proposal. L. J. Wagner, president of the Order of Railway Conductors and Brakemen, told the Senate Commerce Committee the new offer was made Saturday in the reopened bargaining session. He said no reply had come from the carriers and said he didn't believe they had had time to present one. However, Daniel P. Loomis, president of the Association of American Railroads, was at the hearing and when asked by a reporter about Wagner's statement, he said: "I have heard about nothing new that amounts to anything." The railroads and unions resumed Labor Department bargaining sessions Friday under prodding from legislators who expressed fears that Congress mighl set a dangerous pattern by stepping into the dispute. Sen. John O. Pastore, D-R.I. the Commerce Committee's acting chairman, has said he doesn't think the two sides are too far apart to reach an agreemeni through bargaining. However, Secretary of Labor W Willard Wirtz has cautioned he sees no chance of a settlement except through legislation. To give Congress a chance to act, the railroads have postponed again until Aug. 29 the new work rules which will eliminate thou sands of jobs and which the unions have said will trigger a nationwide strike. PICKET IN ARMS OF THE LAW A small Negro child is gently carried by a New York City policeman as he removes her from road where she was sitting in front of a truck today. Another policeman leads an older girl away from site of construction work of Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., where ten children were sitting in road.—(AP Wirephoto) Percy Says New St. Louis To Help Area BELLEVILLE, 111. (AP) — A candidate for the Republican nomination for governor of Illinois said Monday that Illinois com munilies are offered new competition by the downtown redevelopment program in St. Louis. Charles Percy, 42, Chicago business executive, told a news con- Fined for Buying Beer on False ID EDWARDSVILLE—An 18-year-old Godfrey girl, charged with using a false identification card to obtain liquor from a tavern near Hartford, was assessed a fine and cost? of $40.60 by Police Magistrate William Traband Monday. Mary Ann Gorman, 2724 Green- vood Lane, Godfrey, was one of hree rounded up by a squad of deputies last week at "The Spot ference in Belleville happy about the' ? St. that he is Louis program, but east side.,communities, have, to compete to make their own communities and business districts more attractive. "Any betterment in one city strengthens the entire region," he said. "When there is competition, there is a tendency to become more alert and aggressive." Percy said that strongly-Democratic St. Clair County has 6,000 unemployed, GV& per cent of the labor force, which is 20 per cent higher than the national and Illinois state average. "There is a lack of opportunity here," he said. "Perhaps there is more migration from the county of stable persons, the very ones you want to retain. "If more jobs were created here, the county would have an industrial base which svould provide additional tax revenues and could reduce property taxes." The work of attracting new industry should lie in the hands of industrial leaders in each community, he said. Crash Kills Groom Just Before Wedding BLOOMFIELD HILLS, Mich. (AP)—Less than four hours before Raymann F. Zehnder Jr., was to be married Monday he was killed in a car smashup. His bride-to-be, Betty Meggs, 22, was injured. Their car, driven by Zehnder, smashed into a tree near the Zehnder home as the two ran last- minute errands before their wedding. llndergroiind Test Ban Still Aim of U. S. GENEVA (AP) — The United itates announced today it will continue working for a treaty oanning underground nuclear weapons tests to supplement the Jmited test ban accord achieved in Moscow last week. U.S. Ambassador Charles C. Stelle told the resumed 17-nation disarmament conference the limited test ban concluded in Mos- Not Enough,' Now City Still Has $11,000 in MFTfor Dogtown Route Alton still has an apparently- live MFT appropriation of about $11,000 for construction of a street through East End Flaw, but Mayor F. W, Pay says this fund would neither apply nor suffice for acquisition ol rlghts-of-way to obtain a street connection between Broadway and the proposed berni highway.- Day announced Monday that he bejieves the city should lose no time int pushing ahead with Us plans for the Broadway-Perm connection, but pointed out t h a t right' of • way problems in East En4 Place may be liifflcult now that the Rpstown urban renewal project to dead. ' Under, the Dogtown renewal project, the city had included an arrangement to get righ'-of-way automatically for the portion of the connecting route within East End Place, Now It may have to seek it Iron? private property owners, Records of City Clerk Paul Price show that the City Council In September, 1960, asspd an $11 ,500 motor fuel tax appropriation {or construction of a blacktopped roadway on or near Indiana Ave^ nue from Broadway to a point 100 feet south of Palmer Street, The appropriation' was subsequently approved by the Division pj Highways. C|ty CpmptroJler H- B- Ramey said his records show only one expenditure, that of $1,180, has been nmde from this fund. Of this amount, $1,175 was paid to the city's project engineers for a preliminary survey and plan lor the roadway through East End Place. The made city would obtain (he right-of-way preliminary plans were in expectation the city without cost under the Dogtowr clearance program- Later, the planned route through East End place was made a part of a proposed crosstown route that woulc include the Bvpadway^erm link but |or which no appropriation was immediately made. Four North Koreans Are Hunted Out, Killed American Soldier Also Slain in Clash By ROBERT EUNSON SEOUL, Korea (AP)—Strengthened U.S. Army patrols backed by South Korean national police, killed four heavily armed North Korean Communist infiltrators today in a hunt for Red raiders who have slain three U.S. soldiers in two days. Looking "under every bush," in the words of one U.S. commanding officer, (he forces hunted down infiltrating saboteurs on missions close by the headquarters of the U.S. 4th Cavalry Regiment command post, six miles south of the Korean demilitarized zone. The fighting was the farthest south of the buffer area since the Korean armistice was signed July 27, 1953. The action was set off Monday by the ambush of a U.S. jeep in which two U.S. soldiers were killed and a third wounded, below the Korean armistice line. With vigilance renewed and patrols strengthened, the hunt began for those attackers. Two Killed As troops and police scoured the area, another American soldier and a South Korean police officer engaged in another clash that cost their lives in the grassy bottomland south of the Imjin River, near Dangdong-iri. In Washington the Army identi- of as the soldier cow "does not accomplish the strongly preferred objective of the United States, a comprehensive treaty banning tests in all environments." The Moscow treaty is for banning tests in the atmosphere, in space and under water, but does not include nuclear explosions underground. Stelle's statement came at the outset of the conference which gathered amid uncertainty over its future. Soviet negotiator Semyon K. Tsarapkin and Britain's Peter Thomas also were on hand to out line their positions on the limited test ban accord, generally hailed as a major cold war breakthrough. The American neogtiator made no reference to Monday's statement by French President Charles de Gaulle, who said France will not join the Moscow treaty and will go ahead with her own nuclear weapons development. All major disarmament issue: before the conference, resuming after a six-week recess, were still deadlocked after 16 months of negotiations. The only two steps forsvard since the beginning of the Geneva talks—the test ban treaty and the direct Moscosv-Washington "hotline" communications linMo pre^ vent accidental war—were nego tiated outside the conference. Four Arrested in Berlin Escape Try BERLIN (AP) — Communist border guards Monday night at v rested four persons trying to escape from East Berlin, West Berlin police said today. The four had lowered a cable from the fourth floor of a house near the wall when a Red patrol discovered the attempt. Tavern," located in an old brick school building south of Hartford. The girl said she used her sister's identification card to gain admittance to the place where she ordered beer. She told sheriff's investigators she-was served the beer by a waitress and paid 40 cents for the purchase. She said she visited the tavern on at least a dozen other occasions and was not ask«d for an identification card. She said she was served beer on most of these occasions. Legal age for purchase of alco- :iolic beverages is 21. Two plain clothes deputies were stationed in the county tavern on the night of the "check" and observed three youths who appeared to be under age, including Miss Gorman, the sheriff's office reported. When six other deputies, led by Chief Deputy Ramach, arrived, the three youths were rounded up and taken to Wood River police department and questioned by sheriff's investigators. Following an investigation the Jodfrey girl was charged in warrant of using a false identification to obtain beer at the tavern in an unincorporated area of the county. DATA AT THE DAM 8u.ni. temperature Yesterday's today 75 River tune below ilam ut 8 a.m. 5.5. Pool 23.<. high 87 u ,low 71°. Precipitation 24 ITS. to 8 a.m None. fied Cpl. George F. Larion Jr. Davison, Mich., killed today. Larion, 24, was the son of Mr. and Mrs. George F. Larion Sr., of Davison. Col. George Creel, the U.N. Command spokesman who con firmed the four North Koreans were dead, said they could be part of the same raiding patrol which machine-gunned a 1st Cavalry Division jeep Monday, killing two U.S. soldiers and wounding another on their way to guard duty in the. demilitarized zone. There also was speculation the four North Koreans killed today were agents bound on a mission of violent espionage. They carried automatic weapons and hand grenades. Gunned Down The first North Koreans were gunned down about 9 a.m. It was in this clash that a soldier of the U.S. 7th Infantry Division and the Korean police officer died. At about 4 p.m., the other two North Koreans were surrounded in deep grass west of the road to Panmunjom and about a mile south of Freedom Bridge. While an American Army heli copter hovered overhead, about 50 national policemen and half a dozen U.S. soldiers closed in. Two hand grenade explosions were heard, leading to speculation the agents took their own lives. afternoon. They interviewed the husband of an old woman who was held captive by the four Communists. Yang Chon Soon, 52, was out collecting mushrooms in the bushy area where the grass i head high. Suddenly someone grabbed her by the wrist and de manded: "Why are you here? This is a firing range. Do you lave anyone working in the gov ernment?" Held Prisoner The woman was held about 2' minutes and let go. Her daughte ran to the police box to report the incident to police, but police men were out searching for the Morth Koreans. The North Koreans came to thi area three days ago, they told th frightened woman. Dangdong-iri is about two mile northwest of Musan-ni, on road to Panmumjon. It is on mile short of Freedom Bridge where American prisoners of wa Associated Press Kim Chong-kil and photographer reporter An Mu-hun arrived on the spot shortly before the shooting started this returned after agreement was the armistic signed 10 year and three days ago. The North Koreans were hunte down 400 yards from the heac quarters of the 4th Cavalry Reg ment 'command post, which ma have been their objective. Kennedy Renews Tax Cut Plea WASHINGTON (AP)—Presiden Kennedy called again today fo congressional action on the at ministration's tax cut bill. House Speaker John W. McCor mack, D-Mass., told reporters th President stressed, at a Whit House meeting with congression al leaders, the need for gettin the bill to the House floor fo debate an enactment at the earl est possible date. McCormack said he was hope ful the House Ways and Mean Committee would send the bill t the floor. TODAY'S CHUCKLE Those who criticize the younger generation seem to forget who raised it. (© 1963, General Features Corp.) K GETS PEACE PIPE Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev laughs as he examines Indian peace pipe that U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Orville Freeman, left, presented to him in the Kremlin today. Khrushchev accepted the pipe saying, "I don't smoke, but I take it as a symbol." (AP Wirephoto) No Gimmicks in Treaty: Mansfield WASHINGTON (AP)—Sen. Mike Mansfield of Montana said after a conference with President Kennedy today that there are "no gimmicks, no side issues," tied to the Moscow test ban treaty. The Senate Democratic leader said the limited test ban agree ment has broad support not only in the Senate •, hich must ratify it, but in the House as well. "We informed the President the chances for strong bipartisan ratification of the treaty by the Senate were excellent and that we expected the ratification would come as soon as possible," Mansfield said after the weekly White House breakfast session of Democratic congressional leaders. Mansfield said Undersecretary of State W. Averell Harriman created a tremendous impression in his appearnce before the Senate Foreign Relations and the Armed Services Committees and the Joint Atomic Energy Committee Monday. He said Harriman answered all questions frankly and openly. It appeared, however, that Senate Republican leaders have killed any chance of a bipartisan display at the formal signing of the test ban treaty in Moscow. Minority leader Everett M, Dirksen said he had not been in- vited to accompany Secretary pi State Dean Rusk on the ceremonial trip and svould not go if he were. Rusk visited with the Illinois Senator briefly Monday bul Dirksen said they did not discuss the matter. "I feel that I should not go even if I were invited because acceptance would leave the implication that I approved of the treaty without knowing fully the effects it will have," Dirksen said. Dirksen told an informal news conference Monday that the White House suggested a conference of but he rejected leaders of both parties before President Kennedy's Friday night television-radio speech on the treaty, which would ban all except underground tests. Sen. Burke B. Hickenlooper, R- lowa, chairman of the Senate OP Policy Committee and senior Republican on the Foreign Relations Committee, said in a separate interview he could not accept an invitation to go to Moscow for the signing ceremony, expected to be held next week. The Rains Came and... 3,000 Melons Ripen All at Once MELON FANCIER Judy Mae, Shetland pony at kosch farm, shares of owner, Clifton Losch, for field-ripened cantaloupes. Because one of the big local melon growers overdid it last week with his own substitute for rain, the South Roxana melon district is fighting an onslaught of cantaloupes. The grower is Clifton Losch. Last week, when all Losch could see was a stretch of dry weather threatening development of his melon fields, he brought out his network of aluminum pipe, connected up the sprinklers and turned on the pump. He intended to bring the melons along slowly, envisioning a gradual ripening stage by the middle of this week. But Losch didn't anticipate any assistance from nature. The weekend rains, piled on top of the w&ter Losch hud artificially up- plied to the field, revived the growing and ripening process. Losch had hurried an ad into the Monday Telegraph, but by Monday afternoon, before the newspaper was out, word had gotten around the Losch's melons wero ripe. Family cars and an occasional truck arrived to start hauling away the first of the area's 1963 crop. The local crop this year is at least a sveek late, even with Losch's own stepping-up method, Madison County Farm Adviser T. W. May said Monday. Losch said that the heavy run of cantaloupes will continue until the end of the crop, what with tho rain that fell on everybody. Watermelons, however we still several weeks away, he said. MAW WITH MEKONS IJurbaru Losch, H, daughter of grmver, nurt of (ho crush of cantftlouptMi on Cot»eli fttnn near South Ho.vuim. ,

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