Alton Evening Telegraph from Alton, Illinois on July 1, 1960 · Page 8
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July 1, 1960

Alton Evening Telegraph from Alton, Illinois · Page 8

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Alton, Illinois
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Friday, July 1, 1960
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PAG8 KtOHT ALTON EVENING TELEGRAPH FRIDAY, JULY 1, I960 The Women Social Events — Group Activities ' MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM A. CRIVELLO Anniversary Party Sunday Afternoon Mr. and Mrs. William A. Crivello have invited friends to a party Sunday in observance of their silver wedding anniversary. The party will be held in the Little Theater building on Elm and Henry streets. Ronnie Klaus and his orchestra will play for dancing from 2 until 6 o'clock. The couple was married July 4, 1934 in St. Patrick's Catholic Church here by the Rev. Michael Kearns. They were attended by Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Kasten of Godfrey, who will attend the party Sunday. Miss Donna Crivello. who is stationed with the Navy in Bainbridge, Md., is here for her parents' celebration. The Crivello's other children are Mrs. Joe Twitchell and Miss Susan Crivello. Mr. Crivello is proprietor of Crivello's Confectionary on Bluff street. BeriberiDisease Not Uncommon In America BOSTON, Mass., (Science _ Service.)—Beriberi, a dietary 'disease generally associated with the Orient, is "probably not an uncommon disease in the United States," two Detroit physicians have reported. However, from the few reports on it in the current American medical literature, it apparently Is rarely diagnosed. In the United States, beriberi is primarily associated with alcoholic patients, according to Dr. Paul L. Wolf, resident, department of pathology, Wayne State University Affiliated Hospitals and Dr. Murray B. Levin, resident, department of internal medicine. City of Detroit Receiving Hospital and Wayne State University College of Medicine. In two instances of Shosh'in beriberi described by the doctors in an article in the New England Journal of Medicine (June 30) both victims had foregone food for liquor for a period of days. In one case, where the disease was recognized and thiamine therapy applied, "the patient made a dramatic recovery." Failure to diagnose the other case resulted in death 5'a hours after admission to the hospital. The reporting doctors consider the disease in its alcoholic manifestations "a medical emergency" to which more attention should be given so that diagnosis and treatment may be applied in time to prevent fatalities. Beriberi is an ancient di- Sun-Dried? Business Center Is Needed For Housewife By RUTH MILLETT Years , ago I wrote that it was a crying shame that in most homes the housewife doesn't have a desk and file cabinet or any place to put one. At long last the decorating magazines have come to the same conclusion and are now stressing the fact that somewhere in the home, in the kitchen, master bedroom, living room or hallway—a woman who runs a home and keeps track of a thousand and one details of family living ought to have'a desk to call her own. Running a home is a business and the woman who is responsible for seeing that it runs smoothly is an executive. How can she expect to be businesslike—if she doesn't have some kind of a business-like setup? Along with the desk where she can sit down to make her telephone calls, write out menus and grocery lists, keep up with her correspondence, pay bills and balance the check book she needs a good filing system. Who else but mam is going 1o keep track of the children's Picnic Sapper Members of the Junjor Service League and their husbands had a picnic supper at Western Military Academy for their meeting this week. sease caused by inadequate diet and resulting vitamin deficiency, particularly of B-l (thiamine). It was first described in Oriental literature as far back as 2,697 B.C.; but it was not mentioned in Western accounts until 4,000 years later in 1642 A.D. Born to: Mr. and Mr*. Robert C. MHwnfcelmet. 310 Kenny St., Bethalto. a daughter, 6 pounds. 4 ounces, 11:5fi a.m.. Thursday. Wood River Township Hospital., Elder children, Robbie 4, Kim 3. and Bret, 18 months. Mr. and Mr*, .lark flyman, 1406 Sixth St., Cottage Hills, a daughter, 5 pounds. 12 ounces, 8:10 p.m., Thursday, Wood River Township Hospital. Mr. and Mr*. Chartr* Hnr- rington, 29 N. Dryden St., Arlington Heights, a daughter, Kelly Ann, first child. B pounds and 9 ounces. Monday. Sherman Hospital. Elgin. The Har- ringtons are former Wood River residents. Mr. and Mrs. O. E. Harrington. 761 Condit St.. Wood River, are paternal grandparents, and maternal crandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Charles Clark. Chicago. Mr. and Mrs. Larry Love, West Fifth street. Roxana, a daughter, Kelly Rene, 7 pounds and 2 ounces, 10 a.m., Thursday, St. Joseph's Hospital. Highland. Mrs. Love is the former Miss Judy Kroeger. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wllcox, 89 Shamrock St., East Alton, a daughter. Julie Ann, firrt child. 8 pounds. 13 ounces. 11:28 a.m.. Thursday, Alton Memorial Hospital. Mrs. \Vil- cox is the former Miss Judith Hatfield. Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Rhodes, 532 S. Seventh St., Wood River, a daughter, 9 pounds, 8:16 p.m., Thursday, Alton Memorial Hospital. Elder children, Randal, 5, and Ronica, 4. Mr. and Mrs. Irving Schmidt, Southmoor place, Godfrey, a son. Kenneth Wayne, 8 pounds, 9 ounces, 6:49 a.m. today, Alton Memorial Hospital. Elder child. Dennis, S'-b. Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Lanzerottl, 23 Villa Ridge, Godfrey, a son, 8 pounds and 3 ounces, 7:30 p.m., Thursday, St. Joseph's Hospital. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bunting. 1313 Willard St., a son, 8 pounds, 9 ounces 5:30 p.m., Thursday, St. Joseph's Hospital. Mr. and Mrs. Ora Anderson, 612 Washington Ave., a daughter, 6 pounds, 8 ounces. Thursday, St. Joseph's Hospital. Mr. and Mrs. James Everett, 821 E. Fifth St., a daughter, 7 pounds, 9 ounces, 5:36 p.m., Thursday, St. Joseph's Hospital. Mr. and Mrs. Donald Irvln, Moro, a son, 7 pounds. 10:58 a.m., Thursday, St. Joseph's Hospital. visits to doctor and dentist, their shots, their childhood diseases, and so on? Who else but mama is going to keep track of guarantees on household equipment, instructions for the use of such equipment, receipts for bills paid and the like? And who but mama is going to keep a record of social engagements, family birthdays, gifts given to relatives so they won't be duplicated in the future, a Christmas card list, party menus, etc.? Without some kind of businesslike setup a wife clutters up her mind with endless details, is always searching through bureau drawers and old handbags for important papers and memoranda. In general, she works under a handicap no man would tolerate.—NEA. Give your skin every time you wash ' whiSauman Doe* your skin dry out, age and Ufbton in hot, sunny, windy, w**th«r? . . . It's easy to prevent Give your face, hands. neck . . . ir skin all over ... a Lanolin ttment, with fjyinta LaoaUiMJ ». every time you cleanse. bin* else aofteju. eaotbes, re- 1 skin health lllw Un- jPmpQAc fayniBP In both kitchen h for the Kayingn piiik wrapper next •LANKITS SLIP COVERS . A BIG Help In House Cleaning! Ltf Our SANITONE DRY CLEANING do Hie hard part. You can actually »ee and feel the difference! IJke new beauty return* (o colon., pattern* tuid texture* . .. drape* Imng ju»t right . . . slip cover* fit to perfection . . . blanket* are to luxurloukly *oft. Try u» and *ee. CURTAINS MILTON CLEANERS 1120 MUtt* Rood HO 2-9231 DRANI No Parkin* Problem— Vrive la. Ann Landers She's Embarrassed to Go To Drive-in in His Truck DEAR A**: This may sound like a small problem to you but it has caused me quite a lot of embarrassment. We're going steady and plan to become officially engaged * next year. Jerry I: works for his i father who is an I independent ex- (cavationist. In lease you don't [know what an I independent ex- Icavationist Is, it is someone who 'digs out the dirt Ann Landers, so the foundation Of a new building can be put in. When we go out on dates Jerry picks me up in his dump truck. I don't mind, except it's embarrassing when he takes me to H drive-in. They make us park way on the side. I know this isn't the worst thing that could happen to a Riri. bu( it is a problem. Can you help? TERRY DKAR TERRY: I'm glad you realize this isn't the worst, thing that could happen to a girl. Since the embarrassment is acute only when you go to a drive-in ask Jerry if he can work out double-dates with someone who has a sedan. If it can't bp arranged, don't make an issue of it or you might get dumped—and that would be a shame. * * * # DKAR ANN: My aunt lost her husband after 18 years of the unhappiest marriage on record. This aunt put on a show at the funeral that Katherine Cornell couldn't match'. F,veryone knew he was a perfect saint for putting up with her horrible temper. My uncle liked me very much and always said he wanted me to have his gold and emerald cuff links which belonged to his father. When I told her about this she said she never heard him mention giving me the cuff links, but she offered to sell them to me for $75. My parents are furious but they are willing to buy them if you say It's the thing to do. I have $30 saved and would be happy to put that amount toward the cuff links. What do you say? NEPHEW DEAR NEPttttW: It's very generous of your parents to offer to buy the cuff links, and 1 think you're nice to want to chip in the $30. 1 say go ahead if the cuff links have deep sentimental value. In the years to come you'll be glad you did. * * * * DEAR ANN; I'm heartbroken. My sister had a baby girl after 10 years of marriage. She and her husband were so thrilled to have been blessed with a child after they had all but given up hope. Yesterday the doctor confirmed their suspicions. The little girl is totally blind. Where can we find words to console them? Please, Ann, tell us what we can say to these distraught people In their hour of darkness. Is there any word of encouragement at a time like this? WTTHOUT WORDS DEAR WITHOUT WORDS: Buy the parents a copy of "The Life of Helen Keller." At the age of 19 months, this truly remarkable woman was stricken with an illness which left her not only blind but deaf. She graduated from college with high honors and went on to be one of the most brilliant and productive women of our time. Today at 79, Helen Keller is still doing a marvelous job for the blind all'over the world. Her life's story is an inspiration for handicapped people everywhere. * * * • If alcohol is robbing you or someone you love of health and dignity, send for Ann Landers' booklet, "Help For The Alcoholic," enclosing with your request 20 cents in coin and a large, self-addressed, stamped envelope. (Ann Landers will be glad to help you with your problems. Send them to her in care of the Alton Telegraph enclosing a stamped, self-addressed envelope.) (© I960. Field Enterprises. Inc.) , ~~ You're the Doctor By Joseph D. WMWfffO|, M.D, TBE PAtKTCfO WOttAJT fttato over her neck and chest. "Where am 1?" «h* asks you The palms of her hands are when she first opens her eyes In the Accident Room. She had fainted In school and had been brought here by the no- cool and clammy. You feel that the patient's problems are not hysterical. Brain wave tests do not favor the diagnosis lice ambulance. A teacher of epilepsy. who accompanied her filled In You cheek the patient's blood the details. Don't Overdo Youthful Look Or Actions By ALICIA HART NEA Beauty Editor Diets, hair styling, well-designed clothes arid exercise have given American wometa another 15 years of youth. Great-grandmother was considered old when she was 40. Today, things are different. And this is a pleasant thing to see. A lively concern for one's looks is unquestionably healthy. But when it becomes the sole interest in living or when it produces kittenish airs of a Brigitt Bardot then it's time to call a halt. It's fine to look and be attractive within the scope of your years. But don't try to turn back clocks to'the day when you were 19. You should have grown beyond this by the time you're mature. Tint your hair, yes, and diet by all means. But leave the shrill giggling, the, fluffy ruffles and the youthful mannerisms to the youngsters. The patient, also a teacher. Is in her mid-20s, single, and, In the late morning, just before she fainted, she had complained of intense hunger, palpitation, weakness and fatigue. She had lost consciousness In the ladies' room. Her friend had summoned help. But now, your patient Is again alert and she gives you the rest of the story herself. For the past three years, she has had spells similar to this one but none quite so severe. These attacks occurred usually in the late morning or late afternoon but occasionally came on in the evening about 9 o'clock. In most of these attacks, she noticed first that she began to perspire, felt weak and tired and even noticed that her face blanched visibly. Sometimes there would be a sense of loss of contact with her surroundings and a shaky feeling inwardly. On some occasions, her head would race wildly for a few moments and, at other times, she would experience some blurring of her vision. These "spells." as she called them, usually lasted 15 or 20 minutes. Although she "almost blacked out" several times, she never really actually lost consciousness until this morning. Her spells were worse when she was physically tired or emotionally exhausted. At first, about three years ago, she consulted a physician but, later, fearing that she might .have epilepsy and that this might cost her her teaching job, she tried to fight these spells her own way without medical attention. Gradually, she found from experience that if she could take a hot cup of tea, her spells might be milder or blow over entirely. Today, at school, she had no tea and so could not control her spell. Admitted to Hospital You decide to admit the patient into the hospital for further study. Blackout spells may be due to a great variety of different conditions, ranging from simple hysterical or emotional states to major pathological conditions of the heart, blood vessels, or brain. Since the problem is a potentially serious one, it is best handled in the hospital. As you examine the patient in the hospital, you find that her health appears excellent even on the most careful examination. You notice that she blushes frequently and, even after her facial blushing disappears, but the blush per- sugar and now you have the answer. Her blood sugar Is about half the normal amount. She is suffering from a condition known as spontaneous hypoglycemla — or low-blood- sugar disease. Opposite of Dtabetet Spontaneous hypoglycemla is, In a sense, exactly the opposite of diabetes. In diabetes, the amount of sugar circulating In the patient's blood is too high and this Is usually due to the fact 1 that the pancreas, the gland In the abdomen, is working below par, manufacturing less insulin than normal. In spontaneous hypoglycemia, the pancreas is usually overactive and the excess amount of insulin causes the amount of blood sugar to fall to dangerous levels. As the blood sugar drops from a normal level, nothing happens at first but, when it reaches about a half of what it should be, the patient tends to complain of weakness, fatigue, pallor, headache, hunger, sweating, numbness, double vision, incoherence, and dls- orientation. When the blood sugar is about a tenth of normal, the patient may faint, have convulsions, or even go Into coma. For her acute attack, you allow the patient to have some sugar. In the long run. however, it's best to provide the patient with a diet that is high in protein and low in sugar at first so as not to over-burden the sugar-controlling mechanism of the body. Some medicines may be used to supplement the dietetic therapy but treatment with diet alone usually suffices in most cases. Her own treatment with tea had been so successful because she always put sugar in it. In eight days, you discharge your patient from the hospital, happier in her knowledge that she has low-blood-sugar disease and not something more serious. With continued care and dieting, it is likely that her condition will improve over the years. © I960 N. Y. Herald Tribune. Inc. Cooking Cues Cornstarch and flour do not have equivalent thickening power. If you are substituting flour for cornstarch in a sauce, you'll have to add twice the amount. When you are testing candy make sure that you drop a small amount into a whole cup of cold wa.ter; then count to 30 seconds to allow for cooling before checking. i^HilB^BBBBaBSSlS^SMS^SM^^^^^ Date Book (M(» §*>k Maim met fee SUNDAY, July 3 ««h AMl*«f»»ry Open H«nw«, 24 p.m., Mf. and MM. Lester Mansfield, 806 Rwsdale St. MONDAY. July 4 AJ1 Day Picnic, Lockhaven Country Club. TUESDAY, JULY 5 BPWC Board, 7:30 p.m.. Stratford Hotel. Phil Delta Chi, Alpha Chapter, 7 p.m., MlM Susan Bailey, 2120 Lawton St. ftegifttratton for YWCA-Monttcello Program, 10 a.m. to noon, and 1*3 p.m., Monticello Campus. WEDNESDAY, July e Beta oamma Lpsllon, senior chapter, 8 p.m., Mineral Springs Motel. Lockhaven Women's Advisory Committee, 1:30 p.m., Lockhaven Country Club. Lambda Chi Bub-Debt, 7:30 p.m., Miss Carole Conley, 821 Douglas St. THURSDAY, July 7 Alton Horticultural Society, 12:30 covered dish luncheon, Onized Clubgrounds, Area 2. FRIDAY, July 8 . No Meetings Scheduled. SATURDAY, July 9 Order of Amaranth, Charity Court, 7:45 p.m., Franklin Masonic Temple; honoring pro-tern officers. {? • f r j i session Held ter, Mrs. Ralph B. Jackson, Western Military Academy. She plans to visit for the summer. Thursday Night College Notes Seven tables were filled for duplicate bridge Thursday evening in Stratford Hotel. Winners in north-south were: first place, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Hewitt; second place. Rev. Gerald Sommers and Miss Anne Sommers; third place, Mrs. Kenneth Kelly and Mrs. Kenneth Brunstein. East-west winners were: first place, Mrs. George Havel and Mrs. Leonard Kleinhenz; second place, Sidney Shapiro and Mrs. Fred Breidenstein; third place, Mrs. Oscar Schmidt and Mrs. John Dunn. Next week's session will feature master point night. Here from Canada Mrs. Henry Cousens of Kingston, Ontario, arrived Wednesday at the home of her daugh- Robert E. Murphy, son of Dr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Murphy of 435 Foulds Ave., has been accepted by St. Ambrose College, Davenport, Iowa, for the fall semester. Cooking Cues To cook fresh beef tongue put it in a kettle with onion, carrot, celery tops, parsley sprigs, a t bay leaf, peppercorns, a few allspice and whole cloves. Cover with svater and simmer from 3 to 5 hours or until tender. B« • "Peach oo the Beach" Ibu Summer — Join Our Body Beautiful Club Now I PAULENFS HOUSE OP FASHION— MtmUeeUo Plan Dial HO e-MM BODY BEAUTIFUL SALON Alton Ptan Dial HO M7I1 ROLLER SKATING LESSONS Classes now open for all ages — Beginners or Advanced IMPROVE YOUR SKATING ICELAND, Inc. 2715 E. Iroodway HO 5-2521 SWS Kroehler "Smartoet" Walnut Enjoy new luxury in your bedroom or dining room with Kroehler "Smartset" ityllng in warm "SaddU" walnut finish . . . You can bt confidant of lasting satisfaction with Kroahlar's famous "parmaniitd" construction tha hiddan quality found only In Kroahlarl Double Dresser and Mirror .... 91U.OO China Triple Dresser and Mirror Panel Bed Bookcase Bed WWW Ghent Nile Table , tmoo I1S0.09 PARK FREE AT REAR ENTRANCE 627-633 East Broadway Buffet , f Prop. Leaf Table Hutch China Cabinet Extension Table SUO.M Arm Chair I27.U Side Chair MM Phont HOword 5-8856 You don't have to b» a "Millionaire" to buy iumlturo at Jacoby'i ... . nothing add«d tar "Ecuiy BudftJ" payment Alton, Illinois Jacoby's Completely Ajr-Conditionid

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