Estherville Daily News from Estherville, Iowa on January 2, 1973 · Page 13
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January 2, 1973

Estherville Daily News from Estherville, Iowa · Page 13

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Estherville, Iowa
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Tuesday, January 2, 1973
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Page 13
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ESTHERVILLE DAILY NEWS, TUES., JAN. 2, 1973 Page 13 Labor Gears for 1973 By NEIL GILBRIDE AP Labor Writer WASHINGTON (AP) - Organized labor is licking the wounds of its severest political split in history and gearing up for major 1973 contract battles that could spell new economic crises for President Nixon. Echoes of the presidential election in which Nixon trounced Democratic nominee George McGovern could haunt crucial labor bargaining such as the Teamsters' national contract for 450,000 truckers and the United Auto Workers' negotiations for 750,000 auto and farm-implement workers. Big Labor split into Nixon, McGovern and neutral camps in the White House election. Teamsters' President Frank E. Fitzsimmons, who will head the union's trucking talks, was Nixon's No. 1 labor supporter in the election, a fact that wiil be difficult to ignore if the government finds it necessary to intervene in the contract negotiations. Auto Workers President Leonard Woodcock went all-out for McGovern in the presidential race, and officials of his union belligerently denounce Nixon's wage controls. Altogether, contracts covering nearly two million workers — most of them among the nation's highest paid — are up for negotiation, and a high Labor Department official says privately that 1973 bargaining could be the most crucial of Nixon's two terms in the White House. Many union officials warn of pent-up demand by workers for big wage hikes that will run headon against the Nixon administration's efforts at moderation to hold down inflation. The AFL-CIO's 78-year-old president, George Meany — who was roundly denounced by many labor officials for breaking traditional labor support for the Democratic presidential nominee — emerged, as the title of a new biography describes him, as the "unchallenged boss of American labor." Meany, after strongly indicating the AFL-CIO would support any Democratic ifprnf^ nee : except George Wallace, New York Mayor John Lindsay or "someone who advocates surrender in Vietnam," led the 13.6-million-member labor federation to a neutral position in the Nixon-McGovern race. Many pro-McGovern labor officials charged Meany was more "neutral" for Nixon than for McGovern, but political analyst Richard Scammon said after the election that Meany was "the man who comes out smelling like a rose." Scammon, coauthor of "the Real Majority" and director of the Election Research Center, said Meany correctly read that labor union members were sharply divided between the two White House contenders and wisely kept the AFL-CIO neutral. Fitzsimmons's Teamsters have not been part of the AFL-CIO since they were booted out on corruption charges in 1955 during the scandal-ridden reigns of former Teamsters Presidents Dave Beck and James R. Hoffa. The wounds over the election will not heal easily in some cases, and some insiders predicted an effort to overhaul the AFL-CICs Committee on Political Education with an eye to prevent future major political splits. The AFL-CIO Machinists union, a major McGovern backer, warned of renewed efforts in Nixon's second term at "antila- bor" legislation in Congress, which remains in the hands of the Democrats. Nixon withdrew his "crippling strikes" legislation late in the presidential campaign, saying it was obvious it couldn't make it through Congress in 1972. But his labor secretary, James D. Hodgson, said the question of strike legislation would be taken up again by the new Commission on Industrial Peace that Nixon intends to set up. Labor leaders — including M,e»ny — had sharply denounced' the "crippling strikes" bill as a thinly disguised effort at compulsory government settlement of labor disputes, and fought it tooth and nail in Congress. Another fight would surely result if any similar legislation comes up this year. The bulk of organized labor was also certain to oppose in Congress renewal of Nixon's legislative authority to control wages and prices in their present form. The law expires April 30. Administration sources said the White House hadn't decided yet whether to try to extend the present system of controls, modify them or junk them altogether. The latter seemed the most unlikely possibility. The Nixon administration near year end pointed to considerable success in reducing the annual inflation rate to a little over 3 per cent a year compared with an annual rate of 4.6 per cent when Nixon first took office. Most labor unions complained that Nixon's controls were tougher on wages than prices, and were helping give big business record profits. Auto Workers contracts with Ford, Chrysler and General Motors covering 670,000 workers expire in September, along with contracts for some 73,000 farm equipment employes. The Teamsters national contract expires in June. But if the budget ever goes beyond this theoretical ceiling, it is considered to be inflation- inviting fiscal policy. The outlook for fiscal 1973 and fiscal 1974 is for two full-employment budget deficits unless tighter spending controls are adopted. Democratic economists believe the administration is overly concerned with this problem at this time, saying the economic recovery that began in late 1971 has yet to bring the nation full prosperity. They say the Republican administration can't stand enough of a good thing. The months ahead also will determine how Nixon's new economic setup will work. He has in effect demoted his Council of Economic Advisers and installed Treasury Secretary Shultz as an economic czar in over-all charge of domestic and international economic policy. While the domestic economy usually gets most of the atten­ tion, international economic policy will be more crucial in 1973 than ever. It is a year in which the United States and 124 nations will be negotiating a new world monetary system which will determine economic relationships for perhaps two decades. Final agreement could come as early as September. The United States will be pushing for fairer rules governing changes in currency values of nations. Long troubled with balance-of-payments deficits, mainly because of its role in rebuilding Europe and Japan after World War II, the United States wants rules to help overcome this imbalance. Basically, it is seeking a deal in which nations with payments surpluses would face strong pressure to raise the value of their currencies, just as a country with deficits is under pressure to devalue. FREE PRESCRIPTION DELIVERY -- THRIFT STAMPS WITH EVERY PURCHASE' I Be ESTHERVILLE DRUG PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS OPEN 9 TO 6 DAILY — SUNDAYS 10 TO 12 -- THURSDAYS' 9 TO 9 WEDNESDAY THRU SATURDAY SPECIALS! QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED NJ0HTTIME $OLDS1$piCfiE $2.39 List 10-Oz. Economy Size R0BITUSSIN 6-8 hour cough formula. Non-narcotic, good-tasting. J ?.69 List 33% OFF List Price ON ALL COLOR FILM PROCESSING COLOR SLIDES-MOVIES-COLOR PRINTS Compare Our Prices! Deluxe Silk Finish Don't Accept Less Than Our Quality, y ;: ' (Except Black & White, 8 x 10 Enlargements, Special Kodak Werk and Special Orders) 2 DAY SERVICE HEET GAS LINE ANTI-FREEZE Per Can Polaroid C0L0RPACK FILM $077 fjR &Mtt^MKtnaswHHWBwflBflBS COUPON Butter-Nut COFFEE $429! With This Lb. _ Tin • I z. i o7o Coupon | Expires Jan. 6, 1973 ! LIMIT ONE PER FAMILY • ESTHERVILLE DRUG CO. PICK UP YOUR FREE ALMANAC .-J ••• Jj) 50 ESTHERVILLE I THRIFT STAMPS! With This Coupon and Purchase of $5.00 or More. Wednesday thru Saturday January 3, 4, 5, 6 Good On Cash Purchases Only! NOT GOOD ON DELIVERIES ESTHERVILLE DRUG CO. ! I I I I •J Christensen's Store-Wide CLEARANCE GET HERE AND SAVE! READY - TO - WEAR CLEARANCE COATS DRESSES Sportswear OUT THEY GO! Down Go Prices Again on Our Entire Stock of Fine Coats. Buy Now and Save. 25% TO 50% OFF ALL SIZES — TWEEDS UNTRIMMED—FUR TRIMMED OUT THEY GO! AT SACRIFICE PRICES Hundreds of Beautiful Dresses. Cottons—Wools Rayons — Nylons Sizes 5-15 10-20 10 1/2-28 1/2 33V 3 o« our THEY GO; SWEATERS One Rack Now Vi Off Others to 33 1/3 Off OUT THEY GO! Down Go Prices Again on Our Entire Stock of Fine Coats. Buy Now and Save. 25% TO 50% OFF ALL SIZES — TWEEDS UNTRIMMED—FUR TRIMMED OUT THEY GO! AT SACRIFICE PRICES Hundreds of Beautiful Dresses. Cottons—Wools Rayons — Nylons Sizes 5-15 10-20 10 1/2-28 1/2 33V 3 o« SKIRTS One Rack Now Vi Off Others to 33 1/3 Off OUT THEY GO! Down Go Prices Again on Our Entire Stock of Fine Coats. Buy Now and Save. 25% TO 50% OFF ALL SIZES — TWEEDS UNTRIMMED—FUR TRIMMED Large Group BLOUSES NOW V2 PRICE SKIRTS One Rack Now Vi Off Others to 33 1/3 Off OUT THEY GO! Down Go Prices Again on Our Entire Stock of Fine Coats. Buy Now and Save. 25% TO 50% OFF ALL SIZES — TWEEDS UNTRIMMED—FUR TRIMMED Large Group BLOUSES NOW V2 PRICE SLACKS WOOL, COTTON and KNIT Sizes 10-20 33V 3 Off OUT THEY GO! Down Go Prices Again on Our Entire Stock of Fine Coats. Buy Now and Save. 25% TO 50% OFF ALL SIZES — TWEEDS UNTRIMMED—FUR TRIMMED EXTRA SPECIAL 1 Rack Famous Brand KNIT SUITS 33V 3 Off SLACKS WOOL, COTTON and KNIT Sizes 10-20 33V 3 Off SUEDE COATS and JACKETS None Withheld k . , 25% Off EXTRA SPECIAL 1 Rack Famous Brand KNIT SUITS 33V 3 Off COTTON KNITS COORDINATES SLACKS — TOPS BLOUSES 33'/3 Off SUEDE COATS and JACKETS None Withheld k . , 25% Off CAR COATS ! OUR ENTIRE STOCK" 25% Off COTTON KNITS COORDINATES SLACKS — TOPS BLOUSES 33'/3 Off DRY GOODS CLEARANCE YARD GOODS SALE Hundreds Of Bolts of Brand New Winter Fabrics • POLYESTER KNITS • WOOL KNITS • WOOL • COTTON • QUILTS • FAKE FURS • CORDUROYS • FLEECE NOW 20% ^ 50% OFF LINGERIE SALE PAJAMAS—GOWNS R0DES-0THER ITEMS Up To 50% Off Cottons - Nylons - Flannels Gloves - Mittens Purses - Scarves Novelties Reduced For Clearance Up To 50% Off YARD GOODS SALE Hundreds Of Bolts of Brand New Winter Fabrics • POLYESTER KNITS • WOOL KNITS • WOOL • COTTON • QUILTS • FAKE FURS • CORDUROYS • FLEECE NOW 20% ^ 50% OFF LUGGAGE SALE Discontinued Styles and Colors. Famous SAMS0NITE LUGGAGE Now 33% OFF Costume Jewelry SALE Large Group Vi Price DOWNSTAIRS STORE KAY WHITNEY DRESS CLEARANCE ONE LARGE RACK OF THESE FAMOUS DRESSES YOUR CHOICE $3.88 and $4.88 RUG SALE Reg. $5.98 Values CLOSE-OUT $488 CHILDREN'S WEAR OUR ENTIRE STOCK GIRLS' DRESSES REDUCED FOR CLEARANCE Sizes 1-3 3-6x 7-14 Now 33' 3 Off Children's Coats Jackets—Snowsuits OUR ENTIRE STOCK 33'/ 3 Off SPECIAL RACK Ladies' and Children's COATS Values to $50.00 Close-Out $10.00 and $15.00 SPORTSWEAR SALE Sweaters — Slacks — Skirts Coordinates — Blouses 'A Off HOUSECOATS t ROBES Large Group % Off »"»"•• CHRISTENSEN Save OF ESTHERVILLE All Sales Final

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