Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas on January 27, 1955 · Page 14
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Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas · Page 14

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Hope, Arkansas
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Thursday, January 27, 1955
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Page 14
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tip* V t > HOPE STAR, MOPI, ARKANSAS SPECIALS t>UBARRY 4 and Body i AA 2.00 size.. I.UU indation Lotion 1 r A >si* e I.DU aftSTt 1.75 HUDNUT SPECIALS Plus Fed. lax r ard & Son DRUGGIST ; 102 W, Second St. Phone 7-2292 Camden Voters Favor Bond Issue CAMEN UP) — Camden voters have approved funds for fire protection in three newly annexed areas of the city—Cullendale,Fair- vie w and West Camden Heights. Yeslcrdav's vote was 641-145 for a $75.000 bond issue and a one- mill Jew on property to raise the money. The funds will be used for n new station and equipment. Annexation of the areas was upheld recently by the Arkansas Supreme Court. PRESCOTT NEWS f ri-Service Club Has Business Meeting | Mrs. Kenneth Reaves had char. ge of the recreation with the prize The Tri-Service Club held their l^'J^'r w V ,lm monthly business meeting Friday. 1 8 %hV £ G ' lmes - -anuary 22, at the home of Mrs.l and '!, fill ^ t '' e lllembci 's present Th"' Minuses of the last meeting!, A - dclc ' ctable ****<**• &** and Situation in Costa Rica Some Better The first European settler on the! site of Boston, the Shawnut Pen-] insula between Charles River and' South Bay, was William Blackstone an English clergyman. gave the treasurers report. The club voted to give ?100 to the Polio Fund. Plans were discussed for a dance for the swimming poolfuncl. De- tals will be announced later. At the conclusion of the meeting coffee was served to Mesdames Adam Gjuthrie, Jr., Bob Yarbrough, T. J. Worlhington. Bob Reynolds, Gene Hale, J. R. Bemis, J. M. Pittman. C. P. Arnold, Jr., J. V. Mc- Mahcn, J. B. Franks. M. Adams, Carl Dalrymple, Dudley Rouse. Ruth Hairston Celebrates Birthday Victory Home Demonstration Club Meets In Gordon Home The Victory Home Demonstration Club met Friday. January 21 at 2 o'clock in the home of Mrs. A. B. Gordon with Mrs. J. C. Woodul co-hostess. The devotional was given by \V. D. Durnam. Mrs. Johnny Hooks, secretary and treasurer, read the minutes of the last meeting and gave the treasurers report. Mrs. Bill Bolton, president, had charge of the business. It was voted to give $5 to the polio fund. Miss Lorella McClcnnahan stressed the importance of attending the officers Training School to be held here in the near future. A very interesting demonstration was given on making cafe curtains by Miss McClennahan and Mrs. >r. and Mrs. Glenn Hairston j honored their daughter, Ruth, with a party on Saturday afternoon in celebration of her tenth birthday. The guests enjoyed a picture' , show party at the Nevada Theatre i afterwhich they returned to the! Hairston home and were served ice cream and cnke from the din, ing table covered with a white li- |nen cloth and centered with a pot- jtcd pink primrose flanked by pink tapers. Favors were EvL-rshurp pencil;:., bubble gum and comic books. A yariety of games wore played. Those present included Simone! Webb. Sarah Janet Bryson, Nancy I Brnlton, Gay Henley, Marcia Bu-i chanan, Mary Beth Bryson, Helendale Leclbt'ttor, Linda Scott, Ann Scott, Peggy Warren, Lynne McMahan, Jane; Nelson, Sandra and Sue Ward, Anna Gordon, .Cynthia Arnold, Sammy Cruse. George Hamilton Christopher, Tommy Bonds and Jeyj-y Westmoreland. Mr. and Mrs. Brozie Haynie were the guest;; Sunday o£ Mr. and Mrs. I Jewell Robert in Gurdon. Mrs. Jarvis Lee of Texarkana was the weekend guest of Mr. and Mrs. J. T. McRac. Mrs. Hess Gordon and Jack Gor- By RICHARD G. MASSCCK SAN JOSF, Costa Rica I/ft —The threat of bloodshed between neighboring Costa Rica and Nicaragua end of the two-wcek-old Costa Rican rebels surrendered to intern- rrcnl in Nicragua. An Inter-American Peace Commission pcistpcned p'anned Washington trip to fin- jsn its conciliation job. The retreat of the insurgent remnants across the Nicrapuan fron- tisr apparently marked the definilo end of the two-wek-old Costa Ri can revolution. It came after the San Jose government ordered it. troops into the now abolished neutral zone along the border wit;Nicaragua to hunt rebol holdouts. N:caraguan President Anastasio Somoza said earlier any insurgents cross into the rodcr would be jailed in Managua. Their internment made unnecessary any advance by Costa Rican troops to the frontier rirking a olush with Nicuraguan border guards. Jose Mora zation of American States, said m Warhington that the rebels' retreat "is gcod news since it means the end of a threat" of fighting between Costa Rican and Nicaraguan forces. But in M-jnagua, Teodov Picado Sr., cxilad ex-President of Costa Rica, predicted "there will be many more revolutions" if necessary to oust the government of President Jose Figueres. Picado said his son Teodoro Jr.. West Point-trained field commander of the rebel force, "won't give up." The younger Picado's whero- t'.bouls were not known in San Jose. Thursday, January 27, 1955 Arkansas Pilot Killed in Florida JACKSONVILLE. Fla.UPl— A Little Rock Navy pilot. Lt. J. G. Robert B. Gulley. was killed in the crash of his AD6 Skyraidcr yesterday. Gulley. 26. was making practice landings at Jacksonville Naval Air Station. Gulley was graduated from tlin U. S. Naval Academy in 19.12. Hu is survived by his wife, Clara and by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John B. Gulley of 416 Rosetta St., Lit" tie Rock. icing Around Arkansas BY JOE MARSH yt Thursday, January 27, MOM STAR, MOPE, ARKANSAS ARKANSAS HONORED MEMPHIS (/?:--A Biylhovillo Aik., man. Bob Lee Smith. ha; boon elected president of the Mid South Farm Equipment Association. Winding up a two-day yesterday, the dealers Smith to succeed M. H of Jackson, Tenn. George E Wade, Greenwood. Miss., was named 1st vice-president and Oscar Bcyver. Knoxville Tenn., 2nd vice-president. ^^ Carroll Counfy 'Little Switzerland" of Arkansas nice tin':! n»nn:cl i Maddux! HITCHED A LIFE LINCOLN. Neb. 'UP) An in-' tnntc: of a Nc'brask;i rofoi matorv i today bemoaned his oh-icc i:f tivin- -pnrtiition in a break for freedom, j After fiecin." over ;: fence he ! liitchhikcd a ride with a .sUilc safely pntrolman. For more lhan 50 years Carroll County, with its GOO flowing springs, has been one of the out- sumding resorts and watering places of the middle west. Its largest community, Eureka Springs, is known as the "Little Switzerland" of Arkansas because of its steep and winding streets. A county since 1823, 13 years before Arkansas became a state, Carroll County was named for Charles Carroll of Virginia, a signer of the D'ciaration of Independence. Carroll County draws thousands of tourists annually for fishing, rest- ing, hiking, and just plain looking. The Ozark Folk Festival at Eureka Springs and the County Fair at Berryville arc big annual events enjoyed by all. Speaking of enjoyment, friendly ( folks everywhere enjoy beer served/ in clean, wholesome legal establishments. American beer and ale have become a tradition of vac.Kion- lands everywhere . . . adding toi the contentment and enjoyment of, rest and recreation. ! Wilson Sees No Need for Any Changes Ey RUSSELL BRINES COPYRIGHT 1954 BY ERANK GRUBER. DISTRIBUTED »Y is goos-3 WASHINGTON W! — Secretary of ?±, 1Se Y'i 50 " !° W 8 concerned bank" which was given to Johnny Congress today he sees no need F|etcher and Sam 9C „ Alic * - — important, changes" in cummings. Johnny and S ? m were THE STORY: The only clue,!he pays a call on Jess Carmi- apparently, jn the murder of Jessichael, Sr., wealthy father of the Unilcd Staters £.rmed forces cf war." Wilson. "short collecting a long overdue bill from Alice and she was short of cash. appearing brfore the I she gave them the bank. Johnny VJJ, L'niUj Stales Drcti'nt l-'nunitalhn. Inc.. ArLuuai DU-iiiun. '. Pyramid Building, Ullle Jiock, Arl.anias '. Hcn:sc Aimed Services Committee to report on American military if trcngth. made no mention, in prj- ifcred remarks of the mounting tension over Red Chinese threats to Formosa. But the Formosa sit- urtion loomed large in the background. Also scheduled to brief the lawmakers was Adin. Arthur W. Radford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The House yesterday approved, 409-3, a resolution endorsing acts of war; if President Eisenhower thinks them necessary, to defend Chinese Nationalist island onghold from the Reels. The Senate was expected to follow suit it! a day or so. Eisenhcwcr ' asked Congress for the authority in a triecial message Monday. Chairman Vinson (D-Ga) of t?ie Armed Services Committee told newsmen the briefing by Wilson and Radford had beer, scheduled seme time 1130 and was not speci- ficii:!ly prompted by the Formosa fbe .•ai- playing detective again a n d problem. In his statement, Wilsr.n saicl. "We must be prepared, in line with our collective secut ily responsibilities, to come rapidly and effectively to their (Allied nations') murder victim. CHAPTER 10 The guard talked again into the phone, then osme out and pressed a button that swung open the The limousine rolled up a curved drive and stopped before a pile of dressed stone that was worth roughly half a million, give or take a hundred thousand. "May be a while," Johnny said to the chauffeur of the hired car. They walked up to the front assistance. ... in the event of ag- C ; OO1 . j on nny leaned on the door gression short of general war." • •• — Wilson said ho did not expect Russia "to take action during the next few years that would deliberately precipitate another world conflict." But Communists aims f-re unchango.1, he said, and a "conflict might arise through mis calculation on their part." "I cannot at this time," he added, ''foresee any important reduction in tbe military establishment nor in the total annual military expenditures of the Department of Defense below the present Icvo's, nor do' I see any need for any important increases short of war." Russia Claims First Offer to Share Atoms > MOSCOW W) — The Soviet press today published a statement by atomic scientist Dmilvi Skob'elt- tyn claiming the Soviets had boon the first to propose a sharing of i'tomic secrets among nations. The statement -was containend in an account of an interview whtct the papers said Skobeltsyn liar, given the Daily Workers in Ne\\ York. The atom expert it: repre zcnting the Soviet Union on i com niitlse at U. N. headquarter? making, preliminary arrangements foi the world scientific conference on peaceful uses of ttomic energy, to be held in Geneva next August. The text o^ the interview wa 1 read to f<jroion correspondents ii Moscow yesterday ot the foreign cffice. In New York, the inteivicw did not appear in yesterday's editior of the Worker and a spokesman for the Communist party new.sp.i- per gave only one answer to all cii:e;-lions about ihc matter: "Wo just don't know anything about it." Skobeltsyn said the Soviets first proposed international sharing of litomic secrets in 1946, when they asked that a U. N. crmmitee work cut recommendations for organization of an exchange of such information. He also cited' Russia's recent announcement that she would give atomic aid and information to five Ccmmunisl countries and .said the Soviets were coniidc-ring a further e-xtc-n.';ion of tbis plan. A SPECIAL INVITATION January 28th and 29th FRIDAY and SATURDAY THE JIM SCOTT SHOW BOOT FOR NAUGHT DENVER (UP) — Police, bent on collecting parking fines, clamped an ''iron boot" on a parked automobile, yesterday. Later, a soldier came along, sawed off the boot, threw it in the back of the car and drove off. The Only TRIPLE Guaranteed S^V Jf j-pu doqH «): ".Mrs. Tucker'* (1) and i the tor all ««a»ouing an d if »»y, t? Mrs. , telling Mr, Dealer: Mrs. Tucker will mU-c-in this coupon for lOc, plus 2c for liandliiig. on the mf/r-* , l M M " d -," f i Nlea t lake Margarine. Payment to be made by our salo-men. or i -I"'' i UCk - Cr> v 1 "!""', 1 - TeXaS ' Wil1 not ljy "Denied through Age«,-v or 28 0 " ' ' rc * Uicted> Qr » n ^'^- Coujiou expires don of Little Rock spent the weekend with Mr. and Mrs. Archie Johnson. Miss Dorothy Bradford had as her weekend guests Mr. and Mrs. Lee Harrcll of Hampton. Mr. and Mrs. Sammy McHenry of' Fordyce spent the weekend with relaitvf.s Mr. and Mrs. George Howard Haynie of Magnolia have been the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Thurman Haynie.. Mr. and Mrs. George Wylie of Hope spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Scott and family and Mr. and Mrs. George Wylie and little son, George Sandifer. Mrs. T. c: McRae, Mrs, D, L. McRac and J, T. McRac visited Mrs. Mary Montgomery at the Warner Brown Hospital in El Dorado uii Sunday. Mrs. J. E. Newbcrgur and children of. El Dorado spent Saturday with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Bradley. Mr. and Mrs; John Hubbard and Ed Hubbard of Star City attended graduation exercises at Ihe A&M College in Monticello on Friday ni- jht at which time Ed received his 3. S. degree in education. Mrs. Hoyle Mann and Miss Bertha Gray were the weekend guests of Miss Shannon Pope in Warren. Friends of Roy Loomis will be glad to know he has returned home after undergoing surgery in the ["exarkana Hospital. Texarkana. •Mr. and Mrs. George Wylie an- wunce the arrival of a son, George >an<Jifer, 'on JauXwry, 23rd a.t the Cora Donncil HospilaL '' |lp§¥ei||||C§| OLD FASHION CHOCOLATE DROP A 'special Spring and Summer display of fine fabrics for men and women. Everything thars New" and very very reasonably priced "Storrs - Schaefer Clothes." TOM WARDLAW'S MAIN STREET TAILOR SHOP MARKET SIRLOIN AND T-BONE, GOOD GRADE GOOD LEAN NICE CHUCK TALL KORN, TRAY PACKED Lb. button. The chimes were still bonging inside when a liveried butler opened the door. "Mr. Fletcher" "That's right, Wiikins. I just stopped in to cffcr my condolences to Jess." "It's a very sad thing, sir," said the butler. "Mr. Carmichael is tf.king it very badly." •'That's only natural." The butler consulted a leather booklet in his hand. "I'm afraid I don't hava your name hers, Johnny looked at him blankly. "Are you supposed to have it" "Yes. sir, you see, there are so many people who try to call en Mr. Carmichael that he found it necessary to make up a list of his friends to whom he is in." "And my name isn't in the book Well, what do you know about that" "If you could tell me the nature of your business. Joseph, at the gate, said that—that j'ou were Joseph said in anything a customer. Well, that your car—" "If I'd come up smaller I suppose I couldn't even, have gotten this far" didn't mean that. sir. It's "I only that... The butler again took refuge in his leather book. "Are you a friend of Mr. Car- "From the leok of things,'" Johnny said coldly, "I guess I'm not." He paused,- then added sarcastically, "But if it isn't asking too much of you, I'd appreciate it if you'd just step in and tell SE that Johnny Fletcher is here." "And your business" Johnny turned and struck Sam i violently on the shoulder. "Now, how do you iike that" He turned back to Witkins. "Tell Jess that I'm a customer of his. Tell him that. And if he still doesn't want to see me, that's that." The butler walked off, crossing the lc.rge wide hall and entering a door which he closed behind him. He was gone four or five minutes, then returned. "Mr. Carmichael will see you in the library." He led the way through a drawing room, another hall, then opened a pine-paneled room and stood aside. Johnny and Sam went into the library, a room some 20 by 30 feet .'n size, lined with book- rhelves containing mostly leather- I'oimd and other unread books, Victims of Skid Row to Bet a Boost CHICAGO (UP) — A distinguished attorneys fight to get out of Chicago's tawdry Skid Row was giving a boort today to every bum on the city's "Mile of Misery." Public interest In the case of William G. Wood, a law professor who hit the skids of alcoholism, paid of with new promises of aid for the attorney's Skid How "colleagues." For tv;o days now, Wood has turned up, cold sober and wearing a clean shirt, to assist Municipal Judge Hyman Feldman in dealing with the droves of derelicts who are picked up on West Madison street. Feldman hired Wood at $5 a day when he learned that the 65-year- old Skid Row habitue was once an eper on contract law and one of the top professors at the Kent College ot Law here. Chief Justice Raymond Drymalski announced yesterday »that two new social workers would, be hired End assigned to Fcldman's court on a full-time basis to aid the homeless men. Feldman said "That means I'll be able to try to same some of tb-jse men Instead of merely sentencing them to brief terms in jail for a clean-up." Meanwhile a mayor's committee to rehabilitate the Skid Row burr.bs met to plan how to coordinate its work with the courts, social agencies and the Salvation Army. Wocd himself received the fir^t word from his daughter in years and the good wishes of attorneys who learned their law from him at Kent. Wood's daughter wrote Feldman that United Press dispatches wore the first she had heard of her father for years. "Please let me know (how) I can help him," the daughter wrote. "It is most gratifying to know that you and others have taKen such an interest in an old man who has lost his way. I want to thank you most humbly." Feldman declined to give the daughter's name. He said she lives in a small town near Springfield, 111., and enclosed a long letter for her father. ,R. J. Erie, Jr., of San Francisco and Jack McNulty of New York were among the many former students of Wood's who wrote offering their best wishes and help if necessary. Wood, meanwhile, was sporting a new topcoat and hearing aid — gifts from persons who want tc see him win his battle against Skid Row. Jar Pt. Jar Pt. 12-Oz. , Btl. Ann Page Strawberry Jelly Ann Page Blackberry Jelly Jar' 0 *' Ann Page Blackberry Jam j. 2 ; 01 " Ann Page Salad Mustard ?;"' Ann Page Salad Dressing Ann Page French Dressing " Ann Page Syrup Ann Page Peanut Butter Si°V PACIFIC BRAND GREEN PEAS ARGO ALL GREEN LIMA BEANS WISCONSIN CHEDDAR MILD CHEESE Compare A&P's Prices > ^ t*t' See fiow Much Lower they are onjtem offer /tern/ " \ ' t Western Apple Butter 2 ^ 35* HEINZ TOMATO SOUP ^ VIGO BEEF DOG FOOD'Si*** Your Choice . . *•{ • * * 25 Special Buy! 16-Ox. Cons Special Buy! 2 ^ 25* , Spec/of Buy! ,..,; ,, 45* ViGO DOG FOOD SKIS" EVERBEST PICKLES tiRX,?* ANN PAGE MACARONI l£ WHOLE WHITE POTATOES CAMPBELL'S SOUP 5KS.«. LISBY BLENDED JUICE 2 Your Choice of any of the above /ferns Eocfi 10 C "Super-Right" Quality Meats Allgood Sliced SUPER RIGHT HEAVY CALF Chuck Blade Pot Roast Jess Cnrmichael was seeled in a large green leather chair Across the room, a younger man stood examining the tooling on some of the leather volumes. Car- raichael looked at Johnny, frowning. "Fletcher" "That's ri?ht, Mr. Carmichael. May I offer my condolences" Carmichael made an impatient gesture o' dismissal. "I never saw you before in my life.-" "Neither have I seen you, sir. ' "Why'd-.you tell Wiikins were an old friend" you "I never told him anything of the kind." Carmicha;el iscowled. "J never Eorpet a name or a face, rietcher N T c, I'm certain. I've never done business with you." ''Oh, yes, you have," Johnny "I've been a customer of yours for a good many years." "Ridiculous! I'm the only man n my entire organization who itnows the name of every customer we've got. What stores do you represent' '•None, but — " 'Then who are you" "A customer. I've bought at >'our stores for 20 years, more or ess. Not only in New York, but 'n other cities." A strange expression came over Jess Carmichael's .face — an expression much like that of a man vho has bitten into an apple and discovered therein a half, cf a fat verm. "You're a retail customer" The young man turned from the :ookshelves and studied Fletcher thoughtfully. Johnny Johnny said, "That's right. And "ve always been a booster cf the Carmichael Stores. Your prices rye been gocd, your merchandise has been fine. Up until ecently. I think you should know, lowever, that I'm not satisfied ,'ith your ccrred beef hash. It ised to be that there was plenty gocd red meat in a can, but I sought one last week on 45th Street—Store No. 1144, in case you're interested—and I had to Ci'rch for the meat. Potatoes, hat's all there was in the can, 'Otatoes and here and there a entsy-weentsy bit of the old corned beef " Jess Carmichael bounded out of a iis chair. He took two quick teps toward Johnny, then topped. There was a wild looit n his eyes. ' "'Who —w ho sont you here" "No one. I crme on my own. In, this is n:y friend, Sam Jragg." "Harya, Mr. Carmichael/ 1 said am. extending his hand. Believe Russia Will Ask Meet on Germany LONDON (UP) — Western observers speculated today the Russians will demand another Big Four conference on Germany as a result of their calling an end to the state of war that has existed between the Soviet Union and Ger- mpny since 1941, These officials regarded the Soviet Union's official declaration on Germany as just another propaganda maneuver in the Communist drive against rearmament of the Bcnn .Republic. The British foreign office's only reaction to the Russia move ws a reminder that Britain, France and the United States had made a simll&r declaration almost four years ago. But the French newspaper L'Au- ipre said in an editorial Ihe Russian act was the most effective maneuver in the Soviet campaign against German rearmament. This morning's edition of Pravda hinted the Soviet Union probably will soon sign a peace treaty with the Communist East German republic. Pravda said the fact that a peace treaty has not been signed wss "unprecedented in the history of contemporary international relations," according to a radio Moscow broadcast. The Communist Party organ added that "the Soviet state made Us new peace state aiming at strengthening and developing friendly mutual relations between the Scviet Union and the German Democratic (Communist) Republic." Moscow radio, quoting from, the Pravda editorial, said the end of the state of w&r was "founded upcn acknowledgment of the principles of sovereignty and equality of rights, taking into account the opinion of the gcvernmont of the German Democratic republic and bearing in mind the interests of Eastern Germany as well as Western Germany." This was the only mentioning <^f West Germany in the Pravda editorial, although it commented repeatedly on "the whole -German people." Since the end-of-the-war declaration was made only nine days before the convening of the Supreme soviet in Moscow, it was felt that a separate peace treaty with East Germany will be put before Rus- iia's rubber-sUmp parliament. SUPER RIGHT Lb. SUPER RIGHT PORK SAUSAGE - 29c SMOKED PICNICS CAP'N JOHN FRIED FISH STICKS IOP £ 39c Save on Fresh Fruits and Vegetables! FLORIDA TEMPLE ORANGES ; Lbs. 15c FLORIDA NEW POTATOES KENTUCKY WONDER GREEN BEANS CALIFORNIA CALIFORNIA CALAVAS - 15c LETTUCE Lbs. Lbs. Head 19c 15c •. AUSTEX »*>,. PLAIN CHILI No. 300 Can '. 24 Oz. Can if, • .#(«. I -1 TAMALES No. 300 Cons; - £ •' *•> 4 NABISCO ALL-AMIMCAN ASSORTED COOKIES NABISCO SAlTINt '" ' PREMIUM CRACKERS "£.* ^ i»MJ 4ift DETERGENT CHEER Giant Size. 69* LIQUID DETERGENT JOY Giant Bottle LUCKY STOP LAS CRUCES, N. M. — The car tore down the highway at 74 miles an hour. State Police Sgt. Jerry Brunk. leading a radsr speed meter, or- c-ercd State Policeman Leo Tcague posted ahead, to stop the driver. Teague flagged do>vn the car. Just as thj car stopped the fight | C y olj, TOILET SOAP CAMAY Reg. Bars Av TOILET SOAP CAMAY 3 Bath Bars 34^ TOILET SOAP LAVA Large Bars JLt CLEANSER SPIC & SPAN I6.Oz.Pkg. LAUNDRY SQAR P&G large Bar. A* P COFFEE NO COFFEE GIVES MORE FOR YOUR MONEY Compare Custom Ground A&P premium-quality Coffees for freshness, flavor, value! Thpy give you more for your money than most, yet cost you less than others of like quality! GUARANTEED TO PLEASE YOU ... OR YOUR MONEY BACK! EIGHT O'CLOCK a; 89*•''•£»•' RED CIRCLE ',« 954 BOKAR ... '.S 974 3-lb. Bag $2.79 - ** 3-lb. Bag JANE PARKER BAKERY BUYS! BLUEBERRY PIE SPANISH BAR DINNER ROLLS POTATO CHIPS SBU._ 8 S 29* .. 45< , 29' ='?[,'... 2 K 2S< ANGEL FOOD CAKE SPECIAL I Large Ring Price 59* Now Only OUR OWN TIA Vftlf* NfCTAR IIA ,.....;. - ^ Prices effecf/ve f/iroy^h $ai. t ^an. 2? IC*'J fOHMWI 1900 HM1UI. SHORTENING 'V CRISCO 3-lb. Can 85t STAR-KiST CHUNK STYll TUNA 1 . Com 4,t LIBBY'S CHILI Spaghetti z. Can. 27* LIBBY'S POTTED MEAT VIENNAS MBBY'J CORNID BEEF mw j-* ' >

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