The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on July 26, 1966 · Page 20
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 20

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Algona, Iowa
Issue Date:
Tuesday, July 26, 1966
Page:
Page 20
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...by Evelyn July 20 - Oh, what a beautiful morning, Oh, what a beautiful day! Wonderful temperature and sunny! Let us pause and give thanks. In fact, it has been a wonderful week - some days not temperature-wise, but caller wise. First a call from Mattie Thorpe of Margate, Ha., who was accompanied by Dorothy Dewel. Mattie is such a longtime friend and as a member of "our crowd' there was so much to talk about. She uses awalker, which she calls her "iron horse", but gets around nicely. Wish I could do as well. Several years ago, she was in an auto accident and injured a leg. Then she had the misfortune to fall and hurt the knee on the same side. When she told me about the bolts and bars of metal she has to hold the bones in place, I called her a "walking hardware store." Fortunately, she has lost none of the action in the hip and knee and the "horse" is to help keep her balance. My joints, the knees, are held together by a darned poor practice of nature - a lime deposit which fuses the joints. And while on the subject of arthritis, I am sure you will remember Mary Ellen Kelley, Marcus, who was completely bedridden, could use one hand just an inch to write a lovely book, "And With the Dawn, Rejoicing." Alter reading it, I wrote to her as our cases were so similar in many ways, but she was so much more severely stricken, yet she did so much good in her community. She wrote back that she received many letters, some she would like to frame, and mine was one of them. She bad traveled abroad, on a cot as she wasn't able to sit up. It took courage to do that, * * * Yesterday, I read that "Candy", Kathleen Hopp, Glenwood, is to represent the Iowa Society for Crippled Children and Adults in the Miss Handicapped American pageant in Denver, July 29-30. She, too, has rheumatoid arthritis and is confined to a wheel chair. I hope she can use crutches, -too, as well as I can. >fer -t came o& •<& avo ttaa L I aa her. I a&tartrfcC 2. ax years agy aw cam* very lucky. A talk vitii Joaa Hulcaisoc, also, convince:; u. have aiessi&gstocountaftfcrijfci ing of cases she lias sewi Tucson. But back to visitors. I hadn't Tpoont to digress. Other callers from a distance where Jeauettfc Goeders and her uusbaiK;, Sam Bush, ladepeixience, Ko. I've known her since siie was i little girl. TUe}- came to attend ner class reunion. Sae came bearing gift* from herself <aao her mother, Elsa, also of toofc- pentieace - a very pretty foliage •with little pert birSs; aad a roU of scented, Sowwes paper drawer lining. Isr*t &ai a aicfe idea? Assy Joiiasoi is oc vacation, but 2ifc iites italdui; things nice la ay rwse, s- FH turn the ^aper yv« tv her to jj« l my barea) jsic otsi craww t glamorized. music for SMS* time aad both piano aaa into tfee played "Fascination", "By the Light of the Silvery Moon" and other favorites of mine. Her husband is one of those very easy to get acquainted with men, proud of his wife's musical ability, and he endeared himself to me by agreeing we think of Harry Truman as just a little "pipsqueek." Oh, he has gained a little stature after several years as president, but I still am not impressed with him. Harry is losing his vigor physically - and if s no wonder! He's getting along in years and it is to be expected. Of course, I am not on his side politically but I am not so dyed-in-the-wool Republican that I can't admit I admired F. D. R. and John Kennedy. I wonder how things would have gone had J. F. K. lived. * * * Well, size 7-9 and 11 dresses let me out of running for one of Luci's bridesmaids, and pink was never my color, so Til sit back and if I don't forget, I'll probably see what TV has to offer on the big event. My third caller from a distance was Marguerite, more commonly called "Markie" Dalziel, Corona Del Mar, Calif. Her mother, Hazel Lusby, was with her. Markie looks wonderful and has thoroughly enjoyed her three weeks here. Hazel is taking her to Mason City today to take a plane to Chicago. She will fly straight through to California. She had planned to visit a friend in South Carolina, but was advised against it due to the strike. * * * I have had interesting mail, too. A card from Connie Stewart, (Mrs. Clarence) former Algonan, which read, "Have seen a bull fight in Spain. Ugh! Cathedrals, ruins of colliseum, Vatican City, and stage play, "Aida" in Rome. Rode on Nile River, crossed Suez Canal to go to Mt. Sinai, took 2 1/2 hour camel ride and walked the rest of the way. We are back in Cairo tonight and will go to Beirut tomorrow." It was starn;/.") by monastery monks which r<afl "l*pa rnorih f/// 'ii/f/t '/fa'*- Souvenir fa tii 'A. i'.'Ml Oitji! JoiCaJ. U/iC Uii- w/yj ! UA. call siit iu.cl Lej s.:iU:j ;, l.*tl iioir: Ifn's. AJ Ktat, i.tc Kelsou, daughter of UiL-iatt w LfcJ' husbwid Lad couit- lo J Ltr class reuuioa. Foi a.uuuiU;j oi yews SAr. Ktut wat a pro- iesiX.)' at Chairon, KeU., but since retireuieiit thty lia.vt Uvtc at Mesa, Ari/. A uew jicUoul kas titfcu built at Cliadroii acci has o«iu uaiiitc! ioj' MJ. so afl.tr attfcr.diu^ the- ai CuiiOi-oti, tiiey caiut I GOIl't i't'llAittiU-i Uit saasr's aauit auc Uavt iuquij'uc ii'VIil VWiOUE i/ti'SOUfc V/llOUl Lfc c'^mad.ec, but i)uaiit gave Itiai your aQdj'es£ aiud you v/iil pro- j) bt Learnt; Iroua liiiu. /^s Lotts Creek Girl To Wed In October Algona, (la.) Upper Des Moines Tuesday, July 26, 1966 JANETTE WICHTENDAHL Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Wichtendahl of Lotts Creek announce the engagement of their daughter, Janette Ann, Fort Dodge, to David Smith, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Smith, Burt. The wedding will take place Oct. 29 and the couple will be at home in Fort Dodge where the bride-elect is employed as nurses aid at Friendship Haven infirmary. you say, one runs up against a stone wall. Glad to have your note. Wish you could see the changes in the neighborhood. A beautiful apartment house across the road south of your home, a nice house on the Ferguson barn site, the O. B. Laing's lovely home next east, a new house being built just south of Mrs. M. H. McEnroes, and Cora's house moved from Thorington street to the lot west of the "Teeny-Weeny" store, now closed. The lot has been filled in and when completed, will be most attractive. And, of course, we are proud of our new rest home way over on West Kennedy. Esther Willason is certain the court house recorder's office picture was neither Marg nor me. I KNOW it wasn't I and we are not convinced it was my aunt, Mary Henderson, who was Mrs. LaJdloy's deputy. It sounds as though wo ar<; all nuts, doesn't it? nni/!>\ A/xiordlng a/tl':)« l/i (li<! Ouii- *C WiHHtn W!<;<1 V/fcii, l/ak \» tetl tj i fiJJs ijj - "They tell two. * ride and swim in Venice, Ravenna and Florence, Italy, the Assissi Chapel, Rome, Napoli, Isle of Capri, Pisa tower, Milan, Como Lake, San Moritz, Switzerland, Milan and Munich. Doesn't it sound wonderful? I wish Europeans would travel here as much as Americans go abroad. We have some things worth seeing, too. Just to mention a few - our Grand Canyon, Redwood Forest, Carlsbad Caverns, Great Lakes, National Parks, the Black Hills and Mount Rushmore, our mountain ranges, Blue Ridge Mountains, huge cattle ranges, New Orleans, La., with its old French Quarter, and lush meadows. And just wait till we have the 14 blocks of air-conditioned seven-storied buildings in Houston, Texas! * * * Mr. and Mrs. George Jergens, Mr. and Mrs. Dick Sarchet and Mrs. Larry Steinman -saw the Yanks-Twins baseball game at Bloomington, Minn., a week ago Sunday. Hot as it was they enjoyed it very much. Mrs. Jergens is a Yank fan and a few years ago met Roger Maris of the Yanks at Kansas City. His mother-in-law lived at Whittemore a number of years ago. * * * Rape and murder rank first in i/i *»*», ! >/>>;, tjtih iy, I've KfiO), t/.lti. <>;MS J-feJ KUSO/J, KveJyij usii/lm. li./. k-JJ. Lt/i.-jaJ w ^ Viiit U;iIn.'J) Ji'jlfit \JiM U.oii oii iJU;/ rt'-'Ul. Uifcjj wayt iJuO Wrt;. Sciwlty. ajj»ij w my ideas of crime and vandalism is a close runner-up. What distorted minds the individuals must have to resort to such "fun", I-suppose they call it. But when the Grotto at West Bend is included, I wonder how low they can get. * * * Ah! Corn on the Cob - What is better ? Thanks to the Elton Pratts for my first of the season of this delicious food. Californians take heed - Sign in saddle shop - "Fight smog. Buy a horse." Old Port Bremen, Germany was one of the most important tranship- ment centers between Northern and Southern Europe in the Middle ages. In 1358, the German port became a member of the Hanseatic League, a type of common market of large trading houses, affiliating merchants from England to Russia. TIRE SALE BEHITS STANDARD 400 E. STATE yiaccs. I Lav^u't ta Ual. Heidi't ili 1 wjjj (rive you »jw«; of awi Eveiyu weui UiO; a swa/ik cafi; aac paid VC ceul-fc t;)' d s/j.i&t> vt cuke ! Tlit J>juvJ t, 'niiejX; die saw Uit Moua JJii aiKJ wauy the Uouikt" of awi BildgfcUe Bardot, a KEITH R. HOPP We are happy to welcome Keith as new field assistant 1 for the Fed era I Land Bank Associations of Algona- Forest City. Keith and his wife and four children have moved to their new home in Forest City, coming from Pel la, Iowa where he has been vocational agriculture instructor for the past few years. Keith attended elementary and high schools in Iowa City, obtained his B.S. degree in Agriculture Education at Iowa State University, Ames and had two years Army service prior to entering vocational agriculture teaching. We know that Keith will make many fine friends in the Kossuth-Hancock-Winnebago county area which he will be covering in the course of his work. LJVNDB7VNK Federal Land Bank Associations Long-Term Farm Loans • Low Payments (No Penalty For Prepayments) E. H. Hutchins, Manager m ALGONA Soulh of Penny's Preferably Monday and Wednesday • FOREST CITY One Block East Of Courthouse. Tuesdays and Fridays

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