Rushville Republican from Rushville, Indiana on October 19, 1936 · Page 2
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Rushville Republican from Rushville, Indiana · Page 2

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Rushville, Indiana
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Monday, October 19, 1936
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Page 2
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P^a* Two News Phone 3333 ÎHË ttÜSMVILLÈ (INDIANA) REPUBLICAN Ad Photle 2222 Monday, October 19, 1939. SPORT SLANTS By the Associated Press When Mr. Gilhooley of the Indianapolis Gilhooleys put in an appearance at the Roosevelt raceway, Westbury, L. I., the scene of the 300-mile race on Columbus day, more than half a hundred racing stars of this country and Europe declined invitations to meet the gentleman formally. It’s this way: When a racing driver meets Mr. Gilhooley he generally finds himself in the middle of a ditch with what used to be a racing automobile draped around his shoulders and other parts of his anatomy. In the process of becoming tangled, the driver invariably has undergone a most uncomfortable 30 or 40 seconds. “Doing a Gilhooley” made its debut in racing nomenclature during the hectic competition of the Indianapolis 500-miler in 1914. The identical circumstances of that performance will never be repeated. Mr. Gilhooley, whose first name is Ray, has allied himself with the racing team headed by Dave Evans, ironman of Indianapolis, and sponsored by the wealthy Brooklyn sportsman, Mac Hailey. Ray acts as racing agent for Mr. Hailey. Now, a “Gilhooley” at Indianapolis, Roosevelt raceway or any other speedway in this country, is a spin which ends abruptly in a crackup.A driver is not eligible to say he did a “Gilhooley” if he rights his car. He must go through all the motions, including winding up in a convenient ditch. There has been a*iot of discussion as to how the term was introduced into the daredevils’ dictionary. known to me, when the tire blew out it had gone with such force that it _blew inside out, wrapping itself securely around my chain drive and locking the rear wheels. Thus, when I accelerated the result was to spin me even more furiously. All in all, my car made six complete revolutions and then went over the fall. I had done the first ‘Gilhooley.’ “But that’s not the end of the story—not by any means. While I was spinning, Eddie Rickenbacker, another race driver then, not the flying hero or speedway official, came along behind me and just avoided the Gilhooley merry-go-round, running down on the safety apron. Old Joe Dawson was not as fortunate. He attempted to get between me and the outside wall but didn’t allow himself enough clearance and over the wall he went. Louis Disbrow just managed to get down on the safety apron. When Rick, Dawson and Disbrow had decided where to park themselves, my car picked out a convenient spot to hurdle and over we went. Outside of getting a section of the steering wheel through my shoulder, I hadn’t a scratch. Another Honor • Gilhooley, a tall, husky, gray­ haired man with twinkling blue eys, grins reflectively. “I had another claim to attention in those days,” he says. “I drove Barney Oldfield’s famous Green Dragon for the last time. This was a specially built job with a 150-horsepower engine that could perk up to 110 miles an hour. I got off to a flying start, over in New Jersey, lest control, went through a fence, turned over and knocked out a fistful of teeth. The front wheels collapsed, and the chassis bowed in, and when they got through 1 ooking for missing parts they decided that the Green Dragon had quit racing for keeps.” Stepped On The Gas “It happened on Decoration day, 1914,” explains Mr. Gilhoo- | ley. “In that race at Indianapolis I was piloting an Isotta- Fras- chini with a chain drive, a heavy, cumbersome car, but one which, for those days, had plenty of speed. It was in the 105 mile, and I was speeding around the south turn when—bang!—there was a crack like a cannon. I knew there had been a blowout, and felt the car going into a spin. In such a situation, a race driver will accelerate. Down went my foot. Un- PROVES TO )[ IT A Three Days’ Cough Is Your Danger Signal No matter how many medicines you have tried for your cough, chest cold or bronchial irritation, you can get relief now with Creomulsion. Serious trouble may be brewing and you cannot afford to take a chance with anything less than Creomul­ sion, which goes right to the seat of the trouble to aid nature to soothe and heal the inflamed membranes as the germ-laden phlegm Is loosened and expelled. Even if other remedies have failed, don’t be discouraged, your druggist is authorized to guarantee Creomulsion and to refund your money if you are not satisfied with results from the very first bottle. Get Creomulsion right now. (Adv.) Chicago (¿P) — The University of Chicago football fortunes, at a low ebb for more than a decade, have suffered another blow in the loss for the season of Ned Bartlett, speedy halfback from Glendale, Calif., who suffered a brain concussion in Vanderbilt’s 37-to-0 rout of the Maroons. Bartlett, who has suffered similar head injuries in the past few years, was advised never to play again and his loss robs Coach | Clark Shaughnessy of the player | about whom the Maroon offen- | sive hopes for the season had I been built. | Not since the days of North­ erns trouble may be brewing and j western’s “Hard-Luck Hank” Bruder has injury so wrecked the hopes of a potentially great athlete. Starting as a sophomore, Bartlett, extremely fast and shifty, stamped himself as one of the best open-field runners at Chicago in several seasons. Against Michigan he scored two touchdowns within six minutes and otherwise distinguished himself with hard, accurate tackles and a demonstration he already had acquired the art of blocking. But he never again duplicated this performance. Soon after the Michigan battle he suffered a badly wrenched knee and was of little use for the remainder of the season. In his junior year he sprained | an ankle several times before putting himself permanently on ! the unavailable list by cracking two ribs during one of his rare ! game appearances. Returning to school this fall, i he reported for practice in fine physical shape, but in a preseason scrimmage he injured his hip. Against Lawrence college in the Maroon opener, however, he showed to advantage, breaking away for a 41-yard touchdown ! sprint, scoring another touch; down on a shorter dash and 1 passing for good yardage all aft! ernoon. | Then against Vanderbilt, in the opening minutes of the game, he collided with a teammate in spilling a Commodore. He was in a hospital for several days before being released to learn that further football might prove serious. LET THIS SAFE * FLOTATION A PROCESS i Q t brighten YOUR TEETH Until you’ve tried Briten Tooth Paste, you’ll never know how bright your teeth can be. BRITEN employs a new cleansing principle that reaches hidden angles where food particles gather. Good for gums, too. Try BRITEN today. Briten 25c TOOTH PASTE Pitman-Wilson Co. Prompt Delivery Phone 2038 Large Turnout Of Greenfield Net Men Greenfield, Ind., Oct. 19—Basketball practice opened at the Greenfield high school last week with fifty-three boys reporting for the first night of practice, probably the largest turn out in the history of the sport in the local school. Coach Russell Bratton has only Leary, Wilson and Charles Dickmann left over from the first seven players who carried the bulk of the activity last year. Graduation took Hasting, Logan, Pope *and Eugene Dickmann, and incidently about all the height the 1936 squad had. To fill in he has from the reserves Jacobi, Rhue, Warrum, Reese, Eikenberry and Cooper, most of whom saw some little first squad activity last year. The first game comes November 6th against New Palestine here. COLORED RESIDENT SUCCDMBS SUNDAY Mrs. Lucy Johnson, 75, well known local colored resident, passed away at the home of her daughter^ Mrs. Nathan Fletcher, 430 East'Eighth street, at 8:37 o’clock Sunday night. She had been in failing health four years and seriously ill two weeks. The deceased was born in Mt. Sterling, Ky. She had lived in Rushville 55 years. Her husband, Peter Johnson, died in 1919. She was a member of the Wesley M. E. church. Besides Mrs. Fletcher she is survived by another daughter, Mrs. Joshua Brown of Richmond; a brother, James Daniels of this city; and several grandchildren. Funeral services will be held at the Wyatt funeral home at ten o’clock Tuesday morning. The Rev. Fred H. Bunton will be in charge and burial will take place in East Hill cemetery. Friends may call any time at the Funeral Home. Flowers have been asked to be omitted. DUDLEY MARTIN TO SPEAK HERE FRIDAY NIGHT (From Page One) here. This young colored man has gained prominence as an unusual speaker ahd he will bring a message that will appeal to voters of all races. A torch-light parade through the business district at 7 o’clock will precede the speaking program at the gymnasium. Committees for this affair are being selected by Mr. Newhouse and will be announced Tuesday.. Three women’s meetings for this week, in addition to two being held this afternoon, were announced by Mr^. J. F. Miller, county Republican vice-chairman. Mrs. William Swain of Pendleton will speak at a meeting of Anderson township women in the home of Mrs. Frank Mock at Milroy Friday afternoon at 2:30. Two Union township women’s meetings will be held this week. Women of the second precinct will meet Wednesday afternoon at the home of Mrs. Harvey Arnold while Mrs. Alva Bitner will entertain the women from the first precinct Thursday afternoon. call the plaintiff vile names and would make false accusations against him. Walker is asking for a divorce and custody of the couple’s two minor children. CANADIAN STORK CIRCLES HOUSE; MAY BE $750,000 WOMAN, TWO MEN ON TRIAL HERE FOR FOWL THEFT (From Page One) Charles Millar, a bachelor almost to the point of being a misogynist, that he should display such an enthusiastic port-mortal interest in building up the Toronto birthrate? And if Millar had been sincere, why hadn’t he been more specific? Why, the stork ruminated, Millar hadn’t even cared if the babies lived or died, or even — and this made the stork very sad — if the mothers were married. The stork got to thinking about Mrs. Bagnato down there at 1097 West Dundas. Wouldn’t it be nice, he thought, if he could do a little something extra for her this time — twins, perhaps, or more wonderful still, triplets? The best that one baby could do, he knew, would put Mrs." Bagnato in a tie with other mothers for a share of eccentric Mr. Millar’s gold. The stork sighed. Twins or triplets appeared out qf the question. He had borne 23 babies to Mrs. Bagnato over the years, but always he bore them one at a time. Not much like that flight he’d made May 28, 1934, to the farmer’s wife up Callander way — what was her name? Oh, yes: Mrs. Dionne. The stork threw out his chest just thinking about it. Well, he couldn’t spend much more time flying around here doing nothing. He’d heard he and costs, total of $10.55, against each defendant. The court also recommended revocation of Gallimore’s driver’s license for a year. In a civil action, Justice Peters gave possession of property on West Tenth street and $8 damages in favor of Ruth Waits against Harold Glover. and was reported in a serious condtiion at the Fayette Memorial hospital. Rites for Mrs. Dawson will be held at the late residence Tuesday afternoon at 2:30. The Rev. Tryon will officiate and burial will follow in East Hill cemetery. Marriage License Glenn Wright, factory employee of Rush county; and Inez Bailey of Rushville, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Bailey of Rushville. Eugene Hall, machine shop employee of Connersville; and Dorothy King, housekeeper of Rush county, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Virgil King of Richmond. Russell Williams, furrier of Toledo, O.; and Ruth Adams, i houseworker of Rush county, daughter of Joseph Adams of Toledo. Clarence H. Davidson, electrician of Milroy; and Hallie Lanham of Milroy. Howard Newkirk, farmer of Henry county; and Ethel Akers of Rush county, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Scott Akers of Rush county. Stuart Morgan, chemist of Carthage; and Bernadine Herkless, physician’s secretary of Carthage, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Herkless of Rush county. ESCAPES GRIN INJURIES— BUT GOLF IS TOO MUCH! El Reno, Okla. (J- P)—Cecil Wright, El Reno high school football and basketball player, never had been injured in competition—until he tried golf. Caddying at the country club here, he was struck by a golf ball. Several stitches were required to close a gash in his face. NINETEEN PERSONS DROWN WHEN BOAT SINKS; SEVEN SAVED Democratic Ticket President FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT Vice-President JOHN N. GARNER Governor M. CLIFFORD TOWNSEND Lieut. Governor HENRY F. SCHRICKER (From Page One) one was only about a quarter of a mile away. We had no way to attract their attention. Several was supposed to go back and get! times Dault and Ideson pulled another baby for that Mrs. Matthew Kenny who also was trying to win the Millar money. Mrs. Kenny said she’d borne a dozen children in 10 years, but the stork couldn’t remember the exact number. He though it was me back on the lifeboat when I thought I was gone. After ten hours of hanging on, we were rescued. “I wouldn’t have lasted much longer and Ideson wouldn’t have lasted ten minutes,” said the Çadio Service Phone 2760 Universal Radio Laboratories Merwyn Russell W. Cox (From Page One) torneys in the case were engaged in court matters elsewhere. A special venire of eight names to augment the regular jury panel for this trial was drawn Saturday following a court order to this effect. Members of this extra venire are Charles W. Ertel, Washington; Arnold Orme, Rushville; Charles Vogel, Noble; Harry McMillin, Union; T. Lote Carter, Rushville; Lora Alexander, Walker; Ertel Price, Posey; Charles Marshall, Posey. There was little activity in civil court as a result of the criminal trial. Jesse Walker pf this city has filed a divorce action against Ella May Walker. According to the suit the couple was married November 29, 1939, and separated October 13, 1936. The plaintiff charges that the defendant has now left him and their two children. It is also asserted that the defendant refused to do the housework, would stay out late at night without an explanation, would less: But then, he never pre- j captain, one of living triplets. tended to be very good at arith- ! --------------------------me tic. Let the lawyers worry j WOMAN IS VICTIM OF ab^ i! .u . J HIT AND RUN DRIVER But down there at 1097 West j Dundas, with nine properly qualified tots already to her credit, was Mrs. Bagnato— expecting. Today’s sun climbed into the sky: And the poor, befuddled Connersville, Ind., Oct. 18 — [Struck by a hit and run driver near her home, Mrs. John Dawson, 34, 2018 Central avenue, was stork still circled uncertainly , killed. instantly at seven o’clock overhead. THREE PERSONS ARE GIVEN FINES TODAY ON LIQUOR CHARGES | last night. A small daughter of Mrs. Dawson was also hit by the machine Judge Rush Circuit Court GATES KETCHUM Prosecuting Attorney DOUGLAS MORRIS Congressional Representative Tenth District FINLY H. GRAY State Representative Rush and Henry Counties CLIFTON STAMM State Senator Rush, Shelby, Fayette Counties ALDEN ALLISON County Auditor FERN E. JORDAN County Treasurer RICHARD MILLER County Clerk OLIVER DILL County Surveyor ADOLPHUS CAMERON County Sheriff JOHN LOWER County Coroner DR. J. F. BOWEN County Commissioner Northern District GEORGE APPLE County Commissioner Southern District J. CLIFFORD POWER Pol. Adv. (From Page One) sentence of 180 days to the state peqal farm. Arrested on a road about three miles northwest of Rushville at1 seven o’clock Saturday night, Wiley Gallimore and Clem Perkins, both of this city, were placed in jail by Sheriff Dallas Hardwick. A charge of driving a motor vehicle while intoxicated was placed against Gallimore in Justice of Peace Walter Peters’ court while Perkins was booked for public intoxication. Both men pleaded guilty when arraigned Monday morning and Justice Peters placed fines of $1 Announcement! The ARNOLD ORME COMPANY, one of Rushville’s leading established coal firms has been appointed exclusive sales agents for the famous RAYMOND CITY COAL in Rushville. RAYMOND CITY COAL has been a standard in Indiana for 70 continuous years. $ 6.80 Per Ton Delivered RAYMOND CITY COAL & TRANSPORTATION CORPORATION NOTICE OF SALE OF Personal Property Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, administrator of the estate of Mary C. Hawkins, deceased, will offer for sale at public auction at 1224 North Main Street, Rushville, Indiana, on Wednesday, Oct 21,1936 Sale Beginning at 1:00 o’Clock P. M. Living room suite, bed room suite, kitchen furniture, dining room suite, electric sweeper, electric fan, washer, beds, chairs, rugs, tools, and household goods too numerous to mention. ATTENTION HOSPITALS AND DOCTORS Administrator will also offer for sale one fracture bed and one invalid chair. TERMS: CASH WILBUR STIERS ADMINISTRATOR HENLEY & COOPER, Attorneys. PUBLIC AUCTION AT 309 EAST SEVENTH ST. Tuesday, October 20, 1936 Starting at 12 o’Clock One extra good coal and wood range, 1 new Maytag washer, 1 oak dining room suite, 1 white enameled bedroom suite, 1 Hoosier kitchen cabinet, 1 Henderson piano, 1 Air Draft heating stove, bookcase, extra beds, 2 mattresses, 1 oak library table, rockers and kitchen chairs, 4 congoleum rugs, odd dresser, 2 wash stands, and many other useful articles. Tom Ammerman DUSTY MILLER, Auctioneer. For Your Approval y BUICK For 1937 Now on Display Geo. C. Alexander & Co. Corner Second & Morgan. Phone 2216. LET THESE COLUMNS BE YOUR GUIDE Speedy Says Heavy Summer Lubricants Arent Safe NOW Change to Winter Grade lubricants in crankcase, transmission and differential and avoid trouble and expense later. WE USE ONLY GENUINE ALEMITE and the proper grade as prescribed by the makers of your car. Christian Chevrolet Co. 327-329 North Main Street. Phone 3567. Day and Night Service SAVE with SAFETY at xa.uL DRUG STORE

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