The Algona Republican from Algona, Iowa on August 21, 1895 · Page 2
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The Algona Republican from Algona, Iowa · Page 2

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Algona, Iowa
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Wednesday, August 21, 1895
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jwrajr,,Br jTi^wzKprf , Hwirwnari£& j^c^mjmKasmawa^f^igigaHK -^ —^^-^-.^-^^aia^i^^^ urns* j»tim, tim, IAIB IB mnuia itflRnnn, I TUP wiw nfi TOP rnfflw -- - ** . |lll|jlll*lltilrlllll * —1*1 JIJ.LV*LJ i *fc£!LJjfe&J&3&^^ THK KKPUBUCAX, ALOONA IOWA, WKlA'KSDAY, AttGttSt 21, 1896. Ve Offer You a REFtEDY Which INSURES Sflfetjr of Life to Mother and Child. lEXKCTANT MOTHEF "MOTHERS FRIEND" (lobs Confinement of IIS Pali), Horror and Risk. My Tvife used "JtOTiJEttS* t'ltttiND" he- Ifore birth of her ilrst child, she did not i suffer from MIAMI'S or PAINS—was quicUly , i relieved nt the critical hour suffering but little—she had no pains afterward ana her ' ' recovery was rapid. E. E. JOHNSTON. Eti/nuln, Ala. I Sent by Mail or Express, on receipt of |)fico. $1.00 IIP? bottle. Boole "To Moth- 1 ers" mailed Free. , ItlUDFIl'Ml KEfltl.ATOU CO., Atlrtntn, Oa. SOLD BY Alt, DRUGGISTS. 1)0 YOU AVAST TO STOP TOKACCO? You Cull l?e Cm-oil AA'tiltn Using It. The lia'.iit f>r ushi'j; tobacco grows on a man until grave diseas-'il condition* are lu'orluced. T-.il<acoo causes cancel' of the month and sfoiPrtch ; dyspepsia; loss ineiiHTy ; nervous affections ; congestion ol the retina, and wasting of the optic nerve, resultiiiK i'» impairment of vision, even to the extent of blindness jillzz'- ness. or vertifio : tobacco nstluna : nluhtly suf- ffocntion : dull pain in region of the heart, followed latPi 1 hv sharp twin?. palpitation and weakened pulse, resuftinii in fatal heart disease. It also causes loss of vitality. QUIT. UEKOItE IT IS TO J 1,ATB. To unit sudt'eniy is too severe a shock to the system, as tobacco— to tin inveterate user, becomes a stimulant that tils; system continually craves. •T..vro-CUKO" is u scientillc and re- llalile vegetable remedy, gnaronteed to be perfectly harmless, and which has been in use lor the last 23 years, having cured thousands of habitual tobacco users— .smokerc, chewers and GEEAT LOSS OF LIFE SB AM. THK TOBACCO YOU WANT. WlItt.K TAKIX«"BACO-OUKO" IT WILL NOTIFY YOU WHEN TO ST )l>. WK GIVE A WRITTEN GUAHANTKE to perinan entlv cure anv case with three boxes, or refund the money witli 10 per cent interest. "BACO-CUKO" Is not a substitute, but a reliable and scientillc cure— which absolutely destroys the craving for tobacco without the aid of will power, and with no Inconvenience. It leaves the system as pure and free from nicotine, as the day you took your first chew or smoke. Sold by all dniBgWs, at 81.00 per box, three boxes, (thirty days treatment, and UUAKAfs- TEEU CURE.) S3 CO or sent direct iipon receipt ot price SEND SIX TWO-CENT STAMPS FOR SAMPLE BOX, BOOKLET AND PROOFS FREE. Eureka Chemical & Manufacturing Company, Manufacturing Chemists I.a Crosse, Wisconsin. LOW KATES TO DENVER. For the Annual Meeting American Pharmaceutical Association at Denver. Colo.. August 14-24, 1895, the B.. C- 11. & N. Pt'y will sell tickets 1'rom all stations to Denver, Colorado Springs, Pueblo and Manitou, Colo., at rate ol ONE FARE FOR ROUND TRIP Tickets for sale Aucust llth and 12th at all stations. Good to return until August 25th, 1S95. Call on B.. C. R. & N. agents for further information or address the undersigned. J. MORTON, a. T. & r. A., Cedar Rapids, la. Try our Club House corn and toma- oes. LAKGD03J- & HUDSON. AGENTS , Snlary or Commission to good Bleu. Fast t-elUiii; Imported Specialties. Stock Failim to LIYG Replaced Free, We sell only High Grade Stock HIH! true to Name. Also Pure Seed Potato Stock our Specialty Leader. Address Ri D, LUTCHFORD &CO,, NUKSKUYMKN, ROCHESTER, N. Y. Letters promptly answered. We Employ Young Men to distribute our advertisements In part payment, for a high grade Acme bicycle, which we send them on approval. No work done until ttie bicycle arrives and proves satisfactory. Young Ladies If boys or girls apply they must be well recommended. Write for particulars. ACME CYCLE COriPANY, ELKHART, IND. $100 HIGH GRADE ABSOLUTELY FREE. \Ve have contracted for two thousand $100 Bicycles which we pyoposetoglveFRIE to some ope'person in every township in tlie State of Iowa. JJo yQf/want one? This Offer Open for Thirty Days Only, Full particulars upon application. Enclose two cent stamp for reply. Address THE WERNERCQIYIPANY,160AdamsSt.,Chicago. Reference, Any Commercial Agency Farming Pay. 6Y tHE BURNING OP THE GUMMY HOTEL, DENVER, tVhlch W*» Wrecked by (in txploslon. Ilattcry of Hit iff* In the Huxeinbnt Snp- pbsecl to Have JJIovrn tip— The Rtiirn IJiirned Fiercely and Klremen U etc tlnnble to Rescne the ItnnrUoneet tlb- fortun.atns. •4 &&!&;# Purchase a cheap farm with fertile soil where the climate is free from extremes of heat and cold; where there are no blizzards, droughts or cyclones, clost- to the great Eastern market? where profits \viU not be eaten up by uguisportatiprj. Such forms axe, fowrjd. pnly in Yjr- , Aug. 19.— The Guinry ho tel, 1735 to 1733 Lawrence street, was wrecked by a terrific explosion at 12:10 a. tn. The rear half of the building, a 5-story brick and stone structure, \vent down \vith a crash. The hotel was crowded with guests, and nt least 40 of them must have been killed, as well as the entire force of hotel eaa<> ployes, Who were sleeping in the portion of the building which fell. On both sides of Lawrence, from Seventeenth to Eighteenth streets, and on Laramier, directly back of the hotel, the plate glass windows of the business houses were blown in and a number of pedestrians were injured by falling jlass. The fronts of many buildings in the vicinity were badly wrecked. The Hollers Exploded. The cause of the explosion is uncertain, but it is supposed that the battery of boilers in the hotel basement must aave exploded. The sound was heard throughout the city, awakening people a mile from the scene. A cloud of dust was thrown 1,000 feet in the air. During the height of the excitement a team ran away on Eighteenth street, stampeding the great crowd of spectators. A uumbsr of the people were more or less injured by being trampled on and falling in the broken glass which covered the streets and sidewalks in every direction. Electric light wires dangling from Droken poles in the alley added fresh ?eril to the firemen. One hor^e was tilled by coming in contact with a live wire. Two injured women had been almost extricated from the ruins when ;he flames approached so close that ;he rescuers had to abandon them for their own safety. Dentil List Is Filty-s s. At 2:40 24 have been accounted for, six being probably fatally injured and rest less • seriously. Shortly before ;he explosion occurred the night clerk was heard to remark that 70 guests were in the house. The list of servants will not exceed 10, making a possible death list of 56. Night Clerk Irwin is among the survivors, though badly injured. He states that there were 07 rooms in the hotel, of which 52 were occupied, some of them by three persons. In the rear portion, which is completely destroyed, were 16 rooms, all of which were occupied. The Gumry hotel was a 5-story brick with, stone front, and was built about six years ago. It was of the better kind of second-class hotnls, catering Largely to transient family patronage. Thus many ladies, and' children were among the guests. The building was built as the Eden Musee by the widow of General Tom Thumb and was so occupied, later being remodeled for use as a hotel. Gumry & Grenier have owned the hotel for several years. Mr. Gumry was a prominent contractor and had done much of the work dur- the building of the state capitol. Mr. Greuier acted in the capacity of manager. __ Twelve Corpses Taken Out. DENVER, Aug. 19. — At (5 o'clock 12 dead bodies had been taken out. The fire is still burning, but under control and confined to the hotel. More bodies are thought to be under the ruins. THE "CASTLE" BURNED. Holmei" Famous Edifice lu Chicago Destroyed by Fire. CHICAGO, Aug. 19.— H. H. Holmes' •castle," at Sixty-third and Wallace streets, which is said to have been the scene of numerous murders by the owner, was discovered to be on fire at ia:40 a. m. At y a. in. the fire is under control. It did not extend beyond the "castle," This famous building has for some time past been tenanted on the ground floor by a drug store and small restaurant, and it was in the latter that the fire originated. The interior of the building was practically ruined. The losses will aggregate $15,000. _ The Oninlaiis Released. CHICAGO, Aug. 19.— Patrick Quinlan, the janitor of the Holmes' "Castle," was, with his wife, discharged from custody Saturday, There is wow no prospect of Holmes ever being tried in Chicago upon evidence secured thus far. _ : ___ They Could Sell Cheap, MILWAUKEE, Aug, 17,— John PCS- mond, who was arrested here, has confessed that he is a member of a gang of thieves who have plundered Chicago $s Northwestern and St, Paul freight cars in the northern part of the state for mouths pasti The goods were peddled, out to farmers. The prisoner will be taken to Qshkosh for trial. Striker* W1U Work. NEQAUNEE, Mich,, Aug. 19.— It is quite evident that the backbone of the great miners strike is broken, and it is generally conceded tjjat the men will &QOU return to work. Tne business men of Negaunee met a delegation a»d subscribed $125 to the relief fund. The merchants advised the men to ao* cept the terms offered, as they were pot able to give farther, assistance. WASHINGTON, Aug. 15.— Tlw ofifto^al retards fop Angriist sjjpw that ,tfce pyg^i peoUye Irwtf Wp fil tU? CQWiiry tafeep as a w^qle is, m,u,ojj Jare? Jh |ojp |9Y» ,§rai years, Silver nemocrft't* J*«ne rtn Addtt** to the I'crtftlo. WAsmSGtos, Aug. 17. -The silver Democrats devot A a large part of the second day's proc edings to speechmaking, the conmi.ttee on resolutions not being ready to report when the coiuereucj was i ailed to order. The meeting opened at 10 o'clock and it wa* almost 12 o'clock when the committee on resolutions filed into the conference room and Senator Daniel Was recognized to make the report of (he committee's proceedings. This was divided into two sections, one con* sistiug of an address to the Democrats aud the other of a plan of organisa- tion. He said the address in most re 4 Fpects Was the sanis as that adopted by Ihe Democrats of Texas, Missouri and Mississippi. The address was read by Governor Stone. The address issued disclaims speak* ing with party authority, the assemblage being a voluntary one, but strongly represents the opinion of the conference that the party should declare for fr?e coinage of silver. The address concludes as follows: Duty to the people requires that the partv of the people continue the battle for bimetalisni until its efforts are "/owned with success. Therefore be it Resolved, That the Democratic party In national convention assembled should demand the free and unlimited coinage of silver and gold into primary or redemption money at the ratio of 1(5 to 1, without waiting for the action or participation of any other nation. Gold Can lln Cornered. Resolved, That it should declare its irrevocable opposition to the substitution for a metallic money of a panic- breeding, corporation-credit currency, based on a single metal, the supply of which is so limited that it can be cornered at any time by a few banking institutions in Europe and America. Resolved, That it should declare its opposition to the policy and practice of surrendering to the holders of the obligations of the United States the option reserved by the law to the government of redeeming such obligations in either silver coin or gold coin. Resolved, That it should declare its opposition to the issuing of interest- bearing bonds of the United States in time of peaca, especially to placing the treasury of the government under the control of any syndicate of bankers and the issuance of bonds to be sold by them at an enormous profit for the purpose of supplying the federal treasury with gold to maintain the policy of gold monometallism. MARYLAND REPUBLICANS. Lloyd Lowndes nf Cumberland Nominated for Governor. CAMBRIDGE, Md., Aug. 17.—The Republican state convention assembled here during the day and nominated the following ticket by ' acclamation: Governor, Lloyd Lowndes, Cumberland; attorney general, Henry M. Clabaugh, Baltimore; comptroller, Robert P. Graham, Wicomic county. Treasurer of the Republican CHICAGO, Aug. 15.—By unanimous vote the executive committee of the Republican National league in session at the Great Northern hotel chose Aaron J. Bliss of Saginaw, Mich., as treasurer of the league and treasurer ex-omcio of the executive body. New York Democrats. NEW YORK, Aug. 15.—The Democratic state committee, in session here, selected Syracuse, Sept. 24, as the place and time for holding the Democratic state convention. GOING BY ALL RAIL Soo Road Carrying Wheat to the Seaboard for 13 Cents a Hundred. DULUTH, Aug. 17.—Minneapolis underselling Duluth at the seaboard by a full cent was the report received from the East during the day by Duluth wheat shippers. The freight war from the Twin Cities has culminated in the greatest slaughter of tariffs that the Northwest has ever known. The Soo road is said to be carrying wheat to the seaboard at the rate of 12 cents per 100 pounds, or, only 2 cents more than the lowest all rail rate ever known to be made from Chicago to the seaboard, If the other Van Home road, the South Shore and Atlantic, makes the same comparative rate or a trifle lower from Duluth, wheat will go East by all rail instead of lake and rail, GETS FIVE YEARS SHORT CAMPAIGN Views of Sentence of tlie Court Pronounced on W. W. Taylor. PIERRE, S. D,, Aug. 17,^— Judge Gaffyhas sentenced W, W, Taylor to five years in the penitentiary. Taylor at Liberty, PIERRE, S. D., Aug, 17.— Ex*Treas' urer Taylor's attorneys, Homer & Stewart, secured the $30,000 bond re» quired by the supreme court for his appearance Aug. 26, about 9 p. m., and it was approved in open court by the full bench, The New NEW YORK, Aug, I?.—- A special to The World from London says a census of the parliament just assembled shows that only 19Q out of 668 are new men*' bers, AS to occupations, J fi O are Jaw- yers, 6,4 are nianutaQtwers, 88 are me. chanics, 10 prpfessoys in universities, 81 journalists, 13 skilled laborers, 19 brewers, distillers and wipe merchants, 46 &PR*7 and navy officers in active service, }4« genttyi peers' sons peers' 4»iuwe«i ?«mw»ny NgwYQBS, Aug. J7.—TJW is printed, here that e$'Police Commie* eioner Jawes J, MarW» has the leadership of Taaw&ny , that Jhe friends of Rieh&rd have sent; him telegrams urging his Cotnmlttoemen ofi the PreildenH&l Content. CHICAGO, Aug. 19.— Concerning the view of the national coinmitteemen on the question of a long of short cami paign, The Times-Herald says: Thifty*eight national coinmitteis- men, 20 Democrats and 18 &epiiblU cans, have responded to questions asked by The Times^Hefald concerning the policy of holding a slioft pfesiden* tial campaign. The vote is now full enough to clearly indicate the pfobftble Jesuits of the meetings which will shortly be neld b? the two national committees of the dominant parties. The Republican national committee Will declare in favor of a short presidential campaign. The Democratic national committee will declare in f ator of a short national campaign Unless the free silver party dominates the councils of the party. The vote, so far as it has been received and recorded by The Times* Her aid, is as follows: Republican national com* nuttee-*-Por a short campaign, 14: against a short campaign, B; noii-com- mital, 1; total votes, 18. Democratic national committee— For a short campaign, 10; against a short campaign, 6; uou-coaimital, 4; total votes, 20. DAVIS A CANDIDATE. The Minnesota Senator May Be Said to Ho Out for the Presidency. ST. PAUL, Aug. 19.—The Dispatch says: Senator Davis is a full fledged candidate for the Republican nomination for the presidency. The announcement was made in an interview The Dispatch had with Captain H. A. Castle, who is acknowledged to be one of Davis' closest friends and capable of speaking with authority. KEEPING UP THE RESERVE. Bond Syndicate Deposits More Gold in the Sub-Treasury. WASHINGTON, Aug. 17. — United States Treasurer Morgan has received a telegram from Assistant Treasurer Jordan at New York, stating that the bond syndicate had deposited f 1,056,000 in gold in exchange for legal tenders, and later in tlxe day another telegram was received stating that $1,150,000 in gold had been withdrawn for export to Europe. This leaves the gold reserve at the close of business $102,431,061. This second deposit by the syndicate confirms the officials in the belief that it fully intends to see that the $100,000,000 gold reserve is not invaded. BEDDERLY BROTHERS LYNCHED. Careers of Notorious South Da'tota Cattle Thieves Ended. Sioux CITY, la,, Aug. 17.—The Journal's Chamberlain, S. D., special says: A report reached here that the notorious Bedderly brothers, who have long 1 been a terror to cattlemen on account of their bold and wholesale thefts of cattle, have been lynched by a vigilance committee in Buffalo county. Investigating the Massacre. NEW YORK, Aug. 17.—A cablegram to The World from Poo Chow says that the diplomatic party, which the Associated Press advices from Shanghai announced would leave Foo Chow to investigate the massacre, has started upon its mission. The World cable adds: All foreigners in the inland provinces have been ordered to come to Foo Chow. LATEST MARKET REPORT. Milwaukee Grain, MILWAUKEE, Aug. 17, 1S9>. FLOUR— Nominally steady. WHEAT— No. 3 spring, fiS^c; No. 1 Northern. 69^c; September, 66Mc. CORN— No. 3, 89c. OATS— No, 2 white, 24>«ic; No. 8 white. 23@a-lc. BARLEY— Xo. 2, 43c; sample on track 35@40a. RYE— No. 1, Duluth Grain, DULUTH, Aug. 17, 1893. WHEAT— Cash No, 1 bard, 67^c; No. 1 Northern, K6%c; August No, 1 Northern, 66%c; September, No. 1 Northern, 04% c, December, 66c, _ Minneapolis Grata. MlKNEAPOLIS, Aug. 17, 1893. WHEAT— August, Cg%c; September, 63%c; December, 63?ic, On track— No. 1 hard, 65%o; No. 1 Northern, 64%o; No, a Northern, St. Paul Union stock SOUTH ST. PAUL, Aug. 17, 1895. HOGS — Market barely steady on heavy packing bogs, Good light butclier lio?s firm. Range of prices, $4,30@4,40. CATTLE— Steady on fat steer, stacker? and feeders. Cows aud common stuff slow and weak, SHEEP— Steady at recent decline. Lambs, ^,4)0@3,3); muttons, 18.50; common, $1,QO@3.0Q, Receipts; Hogs, 550; cattle, 860; sheep, 150; calves, 10, ____ ; Chicago Union Sto^k Yards. CHicA.ao£ Aug, 17, 1895, HOGS— Marke; active and ^ade lower tbau opeijiiig, Sales ranged at fi.50@5,QO fop JigUt; $ I.80@i85 for mixed; $445(p.74 for heavy poking and snipping lots; |4,15@4.35 for CATTLE— Market weak at yesterday's close; havdly enough to establish^ quota/* tious. Texas steeps, $?.T5@3.90; bulk, 13.3,0® i»,35; Western steers, f3 35@4,60; steers, $8.5;J@15,00; cows and bulls, fl.83@8,75; Tewns, S3. 00g>4.50. SHEKP— Market quiet and weak- Receipt*: . Hog$, 8,000; cattle, 8yO; sheep 1,500, ^ « W, 1833, September. te fiat fengillhihAfi Mail llg Satisfied si to ttar Sitter I»oll6.f MrftSBAFdiis, Aug. if W. C. Washbnfii has fettirned to the citjr ffoitt his tout of neatly thfere months abroad, and Will enter immediately iiato business in cOntiectidii ^ith.his vatiouS itttefests ill Mihifiie- apolis. biScussitig the iiiofle? qtiesMofl, Sea* atot Wftshbtifn said he 'Was a pfd* uouriced bimetftllist; when he went abroad he hoped tJefmahSr •would lead offifl a strong inote foi> art interna* tional agreement, but that is tiow out of the question, as the several smaller states of the German empire hate taken pronounced grounds against silver. The recent election in England, how* ever, is a move in favor of silver, as Balfour, the strongest Man in the cabinet, is a pronounced bimetallisfc. "The attitude of the English toward America**' said Mr, Washburii, "all hinges now oil the silver question. They are favorably disposed toward our securieties, but are Baiting to see what we do about silver. If we should make any false step now they Will have nothing to do with us. On the other hand, if $pe take a conservative position on silver, they are ready to in* vest largely, from their surplus funds, in our securities." DYNAMITED A TRAIN. Cuban Insurgents Kill a Large Number of Spaiilnh Volunteers. TAMPA, Fla., Aug. 17.— Passengers from Cuba report that on last Wednesday an insurgent band under Matagas encountered a baud of Spanish gueiril- las near Colon. Eighty-five of the latter were killed, while the insurgents loss was 7 killed and 83 wounded. Eulogio Lobalto has appeared near Cocodrillas with a band of 260, all well armed with Winchesters aud Machetes. Last Sunday the train bearing a large detachment of Havana volunteers to Santa Clara district was destroyed by dynamite at Bolondron railway bridge. Very few volunteers escaped death. The explosion was terrific. On the 5th inst. at Montegordo, the insurgents and Spanish forces, each numbering 200, had an encounter. The Spanish loss was 9 dead and about 40 wounded; Cuban loss 4 dead and BO wounded. _ _ RAGGED, HALF STARVED LOT. SUMMARY OF WlHi'S NIWS, Spanish Soldiers in Cnba Present a Sorry Appearance. BALTIMORE, Aug. 17.—Charles Wiukler, boatswain of the steamship Culmore, in the fruit trade with Cuba, has returned here and tells of the half starved and ill clad appearance of the Spanish soldiers in Cuba. "There was plenty of firing around Baracoa when we were there two weeks ago," he said, "but it was a wild, disordered sort of a fusilade such as gave the impression that neither the Spanish soldiers nor the rebels desired to do much fighting. We could plainly see the soldiers and they were a ragged, half-starved lot. They seemed utterly lacking of all patriotism, and a $5 bill would have bribed a dozen of them. They wore blue jeans and white duck uniforms and were often seen in their bare feet." BIG PINE PURCHASE. The Knox Lumber Company Boys S20O,- 000 Worth From J. J. Rupp. DULUTH, Aug. 17. —One of the largest pine deals ever made in the Northwest has just been closed here between John J. Bnpp of Saginaw and the Kuox Lumber company of this city, which has a mill at Ely, on the eastern range. The Saginaw man has sold to the lumber company between 70,000,000 and 80,000,000 of pine in townships 68, 64, 10 and 11, for a consideration between $180,000 and $200,000. The pine is east of Ely and will keep the purchasers' mill supplied for several years. Rupp picked up the pine several years ago when it was very cheap, and will realize a handsome profit on his investment, THROWN OUT OF COURT. Cane of the Hoop Heirs Against Wisconsin Cities Dismissed. MADISON, Wis., Aug. 17,—The case of the Hooe heirs against property holders in this city, Poynette, Cross Plains and other Wisconsin towns, jn» volving title to land worth about $1,000,000, was dismissed by Judge Bunn of the federal court for lack of jurisdiction. The complainants filed an amended complaint, but even then it was held by the court that it had no jurisdiction in the case. The plaintiffs will appeal to the United States supreme court. QLOSiD THE HOTIU, Oat Spirit J-afce (la.) ftppfface Turns Seventy-five Guests, ST, JOSEPH, Mo,, Aug. 17.— A spe. ojal frojn Webster City, la., says; Pro. hibitionists at Spirit kake had the wine rooms at Hotel Orleans searched and a gwaoMty of liw? was seiaed and destroyed. Incensed at this action, the proprietors closed the house and ftbputi 75 g»este were compelled' to gp home, Among the gujgts were United, Senator Gear 8»d. Congressman derson, _ _____ Hail » Double £yuoUlng. EwypiNSBpRQ, WasJ},, Attg. J5,« uel Vinion and his son Charles taken out of the eovwty jail by a and, banged. tQ a tree, The two bepaw? iBYOlye4 ja ft salQTO Sunday a»<J murdered. Michael Helrt, B..r\lJle, was bQTO<J 9 YW J?Q Sta^s eraeJ ;iw &7 Pattisou fvv >Yhole § ale et taslt oj kail .be Ineidfty, Ang. 13, Senator Hoar has written a letter at* backing the A. P. A. ^ Sfflail is tiegotiafciilg a commercial treaty With the tJnitM States. A nttmbel of earthquake shocks were experienced itt the City of Meiicfl Monday. Hdward Gould's frachi Niagara woa the race at Southampton, for Lord fiunraveii's challenge cup by neafi? lix minutes. tlie Japanese arnty of Sotith #of-» mosa decisively defeated the rebels after severe fighting oil the 7th and 8th of August. The 500 operatives in the Nauinekeg cotton mills at Salem, Mass., have been notified that their Wages Would be increased 5 to 7 per cent Aug. 19, JFriday and Saturday the Brother• hood of Locomotive Engineers will cel> ebrate the Sad anniversary of the organization of the order ill Pittsburg. Wednesday, Aug. 14. The American Library association is holding a convention at Denver. Howard Gould's yacht Niagara has Won a second race at Southampton. Five children were accidentally shot at Iowa City by a man who fired at the sheriff. Two may die. A negro in St. Louis fired into pas* sengers and the crew of the steamer St. Louis, wounding four. Dr. Russell, said to have been murdered by Holmes in his castle, is living at Grand Rapids, Minn. Fourteen countries are represented at a parliamentary conference on arbitration which opened at Brussels Tuesday. Manitoba's wheat crop, it is estimated, will average 25.5 bushels per acre and a total of over 29,000,000 bushels. Hofer and Bird of St. Paul won four of the seven races the first day of the Minneapolis meet, Hofer winning three. Justin McCarthy has been re-elected president of the Irish parliamentary party. A government commission is in Chicago to inspect the big drainage canal and to ascertain what effect it will have on the water in the Great Lakes. Thursday, Aug. IS. An injunction has been granted against betting at the Harlem track, Chicago. . Henry T. Thurber, President Cleveland's private secretary, is ill at Niagara Falls. Sioux City's population has decreased nearly 10,000 in the past five years, according to the late census. '• Billy Smith and Jimmy Carroll have gone to Mexico to show President Diaz >that prize 'fighting is not brutal sport. J. C. Black was reuominated by the • Tenth Alabama Democratic congressional district by acclamation. The platform was a compromise on the financial question. Baron Beruhard Christian Tauch- nitz, the celebrated publisher of Greek and Latin classics, Hebrew and Greek Bibles and continental editions of British authors, is dead. Friday," Aug. 10. Tom Wilbur, aged 91, suicided at Norwich, N. Y. P. P. Rothermel, Sr., the artist, died at his home in Linfield, Pa., aged 88 years. The Providence Machine company has announced ' a 10 per cent advance in wages. The S. P. Morse Dry Goods company, an extensive Omaha department store, has failed. M. D. Van Horn, ex-mayor of Den- ver,''fell'from a third story window and .was killen. The North Atlantic squadron has left for Bar Harbor. Secretary Herbert was on board the New York, occupying quarters with Captain Evans. Tue Evening News, Augusta, Ga., has suspended publication. The em- ployes entered claims for wages due, and the sheriff levied upon the plant. Saturday, Aug. 17. Lieutenant General Schofield is the guest of Secretary Lamont at Bar Harbor. * A branch of the National Postal Clerks' association has been organized at Sioux City, A general advance in wages has been granted the wiredrawers at the Cleveland rolling mills. The American Librarians association has decided to hold the convention in ISDtf at Cleveland, O, Conferences will be held at Pittsburgh next week to settle the wage scale fop over 40,000 wage workers, In the presence of 5,000 persons at Leinster. Hall, Dublin, Peter Maher, the Irish champion, knocked out Johnson of London in half a minute, The wholesale notion house of Q, M, Linnington, Chicago, one of the Jarg. eet concerns of the kind in the coon* try, has made, a voluntary assignment* Hon. W, P. Pabaey, solicitor of tfee state department, will resign during- September to accept the position of professor of law at the University pjf ' Virginia. Monday, Any, 1$, ^ iyag the largesjb last yeap, The haryesit in tbe Reg r^yer valley' and jfortfo Ps&oja mil be flBishe4 ; \I1 'I^J^4Bi§|il Wfc. ^MMmm^W^;^::^^'M MIM u ^und moneyV< men ^rnK^H ; ; :,::

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