The Algona Republican from Algona, Iowa on July 10, 1895 · Page 4
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The Algona Republican from Algona, Iowa · Page 4

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Algona, Iowa
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Wednesday, July 10, 1895
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Page 4
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f m pmt BY MlLfON Sf AfiB. SUBSCRIPTION RATES; One Year, in Advance. ,$1.50 Si* Months 75 OUR CANDIDATE. Samuel Mayne, the republican candidate for Representative, was born of Scotch-Irish parents in St. Lawrence County, N. Y.,Nov. 14, 1854, anil is now 41 years of age. In 13G4 he went with his parents to Memlota, La Salle County, Illnois, at which time, when but ten years old, he left home to shift for himself- lie obtained a good public school education and then attended college at Naperville, Illinois, and Valparaiso, Indiana, taking an extended and comprehensive literary course at the lust named institution. In 1S79 lie took a thorough course of instruction in Grflltli's School of Elocution and Oratory at Fulton, Illinois. He taught fifteen terms of school to defray tlu j expenses of his education, and he put in his vacations on thn farm. He took his law course at the Iowa State University, graduating from that institution in 1SS2. lie first located in Ea?le Grove, but ssttled in Bancroft in 1883. lie was married three years later to Miss Hose C. Lowen, of Hal coin, Iowa. During his residence of twelve years in Kossuth Mr. Mayne has won the esteem, confidence and admira- miration of the people by his honest dealing, which has become proverbial, and by his fine abilities. He was a can- didte for county auditor in 1889, but was too staunch a republican to be elected in that democratic year. He has several times been Mayor of Bancroft, being very popular at his home, and Congressman Dolliver appointed him postmaster on the resignation of Mr. Jordan. In the recent convention he had the nearly solid support of the north end of the county, and the people of that section, where he is known to almost every settler, are enthusiastic over his success. While other candidates had their earnest supporters in the convention, it can be said now that no nominee of a Kossouth county republican convention ever was backed at the close of the contest with a party better united, or more hearty in his support. So far as can be learned, there is no criticism of the candidate, and the circumstances forbid any criticism of the means employed to secure his' nomination. The canvass was wholly free from personal quarrel, and now that it has ended in the nomination of a man so worthy, and so well equipped for the position, the county is to be congratulated upon the certainty of his election. NOTE AND COMMENT. The Clay county republican convention followed the lead of Palo Alto in asking, by resolution, for the senator- ship for a home man, and Ackley Hubbard, the favorite son, was accorded the privilege of naming the delegation to the senatorial convention. W. W. Cornwall, who represented Clay and Palo Alto counties in the last general assembly, was indorsed and at the convention's request named the representative delegation. The situation in this senatorial district is now such as to render the outcome of the senatorial convention very doubtful. Mr. Clarke of this county has as many delegates as has Mr. Punk. Each has eleven, or eight short of the number required to control. Mr. Hubbard of Clay has eight, and Mr. Brown of Palo Alto has seven. With this interesting quadrangular contest on, it is very difficult to forecast the result of the convention. At the beginning it was anticipated that Clay would give Mr. Punk her eight votes, which would be just enough to give him the nomination. *. * In the canvass for the governorship in 1889 there were four candidates, and on the Sunday morning prior to the convention the Eegister estimated their strength as follows: Hull 449, Wheeler 379, Hutchison 183, and Crapo 18, Larrabee, who was not a candi* date was givtn 14 votes, and 111 were unclassed. In the convention Hutchison was nominated on the twenty-second ballot. This year there are seven candidates, and the Register's last Sunday morning figures were: Drake 366, Harlan 217,Parrott 160, McFarland 115, Harsh 61, Ormsby 28 and Kamrar 31, The Register, which is for Drake, says "it is apparent that the contest will be between the two first named, with the odds in favor of Drake." The convention is being held today. *** When fire risks are lessened and insurance rates are increased simultaneously the average observer is apt to be surprised. Bufc when the phenomenon becomes, toiler by frequent and jn« variable repetition surprise naturally gives way to disgust a«<J indignation at the rapacious-greed of the insurance combination. Here is what the Spirit Lake Beacon says; After months of suspense ontnepmt of our people the insurance combine has handed down its ultimatum, jt is discovered that -with our fine system of Waterworks and our solid brick -structures the rates are uniformly higher than before. There is no foundation in justice or in common sense for this action on the part of the board. By practical tests it has been proven that our water works supply ample protection in all ordinary cases. The removal of wooden buildings and the erection of bricks in their stead also reduces the hazard. It is evident that the board made this raise simply because it had the power. Insurance reports show that the experience of the past in this state does not justify raising the rates. All over the state there is a rising tide of indignation on account of the action of this notorious combine and when the people have had all they will stand with this sort of oppression there will be serious trouble for the insurance board. SCHOOL MA'AMS ARE COMING The ThirtyFirst Annual Session of the Kossuth County Teachers' Institute In- Opens Monday Morning, August 5th, and Will Run Three Weeks—The Faculty Will be a Strong One. The 31st annual session of tin.- Kossuth county teacher's Institute will be held at Algona commencing 8 o'clock a. m., Monday, Aug. o. 1895, and continuing three weeks. FACULTY Supt. B. F. Heed Conductor and Instructor in school law. Prof. J. C. Gilchrist, A. M.,Laurens, la., Lecturer and Instructor in English,Grammar and "child study." Prof. J.B. Young, A. M., Pines tome, Minn., Lecturer and instructor in History and Civics. Prof. A. W. Rich, state normal school, Cedar Falls., Instructor in Arithmetic and Orthography. Miss Eva B. Crowe, Chicago structor in Primary methods. Mrs. Lucia Gale Barber, Cedar Falls, Instructor in Voice Culture, Calisthenics and Posing. Prof. D. R. Augsburg. A. M., Salt Lake City, Utah, "Chalk Talk" and Instructor in Drawing. Prof. E. B. Swift, A. M., Rochester, N. Y., Lecturer. Capt. Carlo Schwaff, Sitka, Alaska.. Lecturer All teachers are expected to be present at the first recitations. To pay the increased expenses of this session every teacher not holding a state certificate will be required to pay the enrollment fee. The general examinations will occur on the last Friday and Saturday of the third week. Circulars of detailed information will soon be mailed to each teacher. B. F. REED, County Supt. SPIRIT LAKE ATTRACTION Great Chautauqua Attractions at That Popular Resort. : ' The Chautauqua Herald, containing the daily program and general information of the Third Annual Spirit Lake Chautauqua Assembly, is athand. Among the attractions enumerated are Rev. Sam Jones, who is to lecture July 13th and preach July 14th; Hon. J. P. Dolliver, July 16; Young People's Day July 17th; Bishop Fowler July 13th and 19th; Gen. John B..Gordon, Veterans' day July22nd; Edouard Remenyi, July 23rd and 24th; Rev. T. DeWittTalmage J uly 25. The Harvard Male Quartette, of Boston, will sing every day from July to 23, and several fine soloists will be heard at frequent intervals. Such entertainers as Prof. II. L. Cumnock, Fred Emerson Brooks and James S. Burdette, are mentioned among the talent, which embraces many other well known lecturers, singers and en- .ercainers. The numerous educational departments are presided over by competent specialists. Two great meetings are held daily, and a season ticket admitting to everything, costs only $3.00. The railroads will sell cheap sxcursion ttckets. Copies of the Chau- auqua Herald, containing information on all points, will be sent on applica- lon to the secretary and superintendent, E. C. Whalen, Spirit Lake, Iowa CLAY COUNTY CANDIDATES. Spencer News: We publish in this ssue the proceedings of the Clay county republican convention that was held last Saturday, if they do not explain themselves we do not know how ;o throw much more light upon the matter. People may think that Clay iouiity "wants the earth." To all such we would say that it is not the iase. People get that impression from reading the face of the resolutions; but upon reading them upon the other side they will find that we want but little in Clay county, "but want that little long," about as long as the longest man in Speneur, and his name is Hubbard, And if we cannot get the state senatorship, then we will very kindly accept the nomination of as ?ood a man for a lower • position, viz: The nomination of W, W. Cornwall for representative. We presume the principal reason for the two resolutions was that Spencer has a goodly number of able men and the people would like to do honor to all of them. THE MAYNE FEATURE. Bancroft Register: The Mayne feat- ire of the next house of representa- rivgs will be the stalwart member fiom Kossuth county. A JOS LOT BATE. That is Wbat ^puybeck & Lambert are Griviflg OB the Iowa Milk Qw< cele- now Having bought a job lot of the brated Jowa milk cans, we are prepared to make very low prices to farmers who are in need of cans. The 8-gallon can weighs 16 pounds and we sell it at $1.65; the 10-gallon can weighs 17 pounds and we sell it at $1.75. These cans are made of the best material, have the Improved handles, and are in all respects prst class. 41-44 PATRIOTISM STILL ALIVE. Aigbna Celebrates the Matidfi's Birth Fittingly. A Crowd Estimated at ii.ooo People Enjoy the Best Fourth of July i>rograrh Ever Seen in Northwest Idwa.— Some of the Features. Algona's celebration of the national anniversary was in all respects a pronounced success. The day was very favorable, the weather being cool, with a fresh breeze. The latter was too strong to admit of the balloon ascension, which was the only attraction advertised which was not made a part of the celebration. Everything was in readiness for the iiscent, the balloon and parachute, manned by the dauntless Tynan, being on hand, and the trench dug in preparation for the inflation of the huge airship, and it was naturally with great reluctance that the committee were compelled to own the neccessity of denying the crowd the enjoyment ot this always imposing spectacle. The day was so cool and the air so fresh and bracing that the usual wearying exertions attendant, upon a proper celebration of the great occasion could be indulged without the tired feeling which generally goes with it. The crowd was the largest that Algona has ever seen. It was larger than any circus crowd we have ever had, and that is always the biggest crowd to match. The estimates range from 10,000 to 15,000 people. The crowds came from distances of twenty-five to fifty miles by trains, and by every means of conveyance from every part of Kossuth and neighbor counties. A thing to be remarked of the crowd was its orderly character. There was no drunkenness anywhere to be seen, nor any disorderly or boisterous conduct to suggest the suspicion that enthusiasm had been imbibed in liquid form. Numerous special police were on hand to h ale expected offenders before the bar of justice or immure them in the seclusion of the jug, but they were without employment. No arrest was made except in the case of a supposed offender against the excise provisions of the city, but that was more an instance of loss of temper than an offense against the dignity of the law. The police had little to do but look on and enjoy the occasion as patriotic citizens taking in the pleasing spectacle, of an orderly demonstration. Beginning with the artillery/ salute' which waked the town and : country, the well planned program wa's" handsomely executed. The artillery detachment, commanded by C. B. Matson, moved from Memorial Hall with military precision, headed by the buglers, Hugh Smith and A. G. Powell, and with artillerymen Matson, L. L. Foster, Guy Taylor and Frank Chandler manning the brass cannon,. The latter was brought into position at the junction of State and Harlan streets, pointing down the hill, and the flag salute of twenty-one guns was fired, the old field piece speaking with a tone befitting the proclamation of independence. The concert given by the Algona Military band at 9 o'clock called together a large crowd, and the streets adjacent to the Court House square were thronged with carriages until the parade began to form, when the latter became at once the center of attraction, INDUSTRIAL PARADE, About Fifty Floats, Representing Algona Business, Were in Line. By 9:30 the floats began to appear upon the scene. The representation of Algona's business was an unqualified success. Nothing approaching it was ever seen before in this section of Iowa, and it would be difficult to convince anyone who saw it that a finer exposition of business enterprise had ever been produced in any town no larger than Algona. The business floats were first suggested as a minor feature of the parade, but Chairman Durdall, with the assistance of Mr. "Pinnell, soon made it apparent that the floats would overshadow every other feature. But even the projectors and promoters were surprised when the magnificent floats moved into line Thursday morning, The showing made would have done credit to a city of 25, r 000 people. The artistic creations were the wonder of all. About sixty firms were represented by floats and otherwise, and the imposing pageant was upwards of two miles in length. It was under the control of Marshal Morse, who was assisted by Col. R, H, Spencer, Capt. Melzar Haggard, Lieut, 0, T. Chubb and E. C, Lewis. The column moved from the School House Square at about 10:30, and marched west to Moore street* then north two blocks to Call, then west, passing around Court House Square then east on State and the Diagonal to Call' again, and back west to Jones street then north to Call's Park. Jt will not be possible to give a.p,y ^equate <jeserJPWQ«. of the various ex* Wts. The following named wer§ f P |f6«Sok SetcMll & SetchelJ, A. 15. McGregor , W. P. Jones, John Paul Co. , J. F. Nicotilin, W. 3. Studley, Jones & Stacy, O. B. Durdali, Dossee & Shaw, H. A. Paine, jf. ft. Laird, E. Gt. Bowyei-, Walker Bros., G. D. Rowe, Schu & Hudson, F. S. Norton, A. L. Peterson, Matson & McCall, J. J. Wilson, Waupte & Hostel 1 , ChtiscMles&H., Parish & Frise, Call & Cettles,- Jno. Gkredefs, M. Starr, Jas. Taylor, B.B.Avey, J. W. Robinson, G. L. Galbraith, W* A, Ladendofff. iHngley & PuRh, ' O. K. Restaurant, C. M. Doxsee, Brownell & A., Grove & Son, M. If. Boats, Langdon & Hudson, P* J. Johnson, A. M. &G. M. Johnson,C. B. Clark. The column was headed by the Ai- gona Military Band, in their handsome new wagon, and distributed at proper intervals were the Emtnetsburg Juvenile State Band and the Burfc Band. The representation of the states of the union was very flue. It was arranged by Miss Gertie Clarke, who is entitled to great credit for the taste and skill employed in the difficult task. Miss Edna Gould presided as the Goddess of Liberty, and the states of the Union were grouped about her in an aggregation of youth and beauty pleasing to behold, in the center of which Iowa, as represented by Miss Maude Dixson, was fittingly accorded a high pedestal. The lire company in their brilliant new uniforms, made a fine show and were the admired of all. The G. A. R. Post were represented by an appropriate float, in the rear of which came the brass cannon. DOLLIVER'S ORATION. An Eloquent and Satisfactory Address by Our Congressman's Brother. The exercises at the Park went off very smoothly, and of course the main feature was the oration delivered by Victor B. Dolliver, of Fort Dod^e. A Fourth of July audience is a hard audience to handle, but -Mr. Dolliver experienced no difficulty in holding it spell bound. It was a very large audience, but Mr. Dolliver's voice was easily heard even at the outskirts, and so interesting did his listeners find his speech that even those who were obliged to stand, held their positions from beginning to close, and joined in the applause which greeted his telling points. The speaker paid a tribute to the pioneers of the Northwest and gave an extended exposition of the prominent events in the history of the republic, and especially tracing .the growth of the ideas of slavery and states rights leading up to the civil war. His eulogy of the soldiers of the war was equal to any that has ever been paid them. He commended the common school system as a necessity in a republican: gov-, ernment and.recoDJmend ( ed the study of the history of their country to the youth of the land, declaring that there could be no patriotism without a knowledge of the principles and institutions which the founders of the nation had established, and of the deeds of valor by which they had been defended. He did not choose to follow the fashion of many orators who made use of the oc- asion to catalogue the dangers threatening our institutions, nor 'to join in a calamity howl too often heard in our political campaigns. He quoted the hopeful words of Webster, uttered long before the quietus had been given to the heresy of states rights, and before a way was to be seen for the solution of the slavery question. He closed with an eloquent tribute to the Puritans and their ideas, and credited them with a powerful influence in the establishment of the government. The speech was one to win a reputation. It wa received with marks of appreciation which would have been a great compliment to any speaker. AFTERNOON AND EVENING. The Rational Game—Historic Scenes Reproduced in Tableaux—A Blaze .of Pyrotechnics, ' The afternoon was given to the ball game between Algona and Bancroft, which was won by the 'former, and to the band concert on the square by the Juvenile State Band. The fire works in the evening were very fine, and taken in connection with the tableaux prepared by Mrs. Horton and Miss Wallace, comprised a unique exhibition which fittingly concluded a celebration wholly successful in all its features. The Delsarte drill was not so fully appreciated as its merits would warrant, for the reason that there was a failure of the lights depended on to make it effective. The tableaux were success* ful in every respect, and the great crowd demonstrated its enthusiasm in all the modes. They were artistic re' productions of historic scenes, from the landing of Columbus to the emancipation proclamation. Alg.ona will not hereafter feel satisfied with my celebration which does not include Jots of statuary. ' I am prepared to give baths, either plain, electric, sit?, salt'glpws, • spray, or pour, with massage an<J other treatment. Come Tuesdays and Thursdays, Can also furnish firs>class recommends as a nurse. Also agent- for folding bathtubs. Come an$ see. Mis. WM Monona, la., Nov. §6.--John Walter says: "Hy child has been afflicted with fits and was otherwise delicate, I aw glad to say that Wood's Worm Destroyer restore4 her to health, J can recommend, it as a great remedy, Sola by all druggists- §MQ U you ou have never UM o,ay. , oa't feRQW wjiai yau'ye roi§&fta ....'•l-J.ifw.vJ^.,. COUNTY'S FINANCIAL STANDING, (ftepfoltect by the Coftirnittee npjioirited by tire Boftfd.) PUM). State... Cdtifttjr. Road. insane school Domestic Animal.. Soviets'Belief.... institute School House Site. Poof .-. • • ALGONA- Wftter Teachers Contingent: School House Side Walk BUBT- leachers . . Contingent Cemetery.. HURTINDKPENnEST- Xeacheis Contingent ...: School House Boad Cemetery Clly BUFlfALO- Teachers Contingent Uoad . Cemetery Hoard of Health.. BANOKOFT INJJKPKNDENT- Teachers Contingent School'tlouse: lload CKE3CO- Teacliers— School House Koad Hoard oflleiiltli COUAVITJI INDKPENDENT- Teachers EAGI.E- Teachers Contingent Koad JFENTON- Toachers Contingent School House Koad Cemetery GBEENWOOL)- leacliers—' Contingent ...; School House Koad Board of Health Cemetery ' GEBMA.N- 'I'eachers Contingent— .-. ... School House. Koad GAKFIELD- Teachers contingent..... School House.. •f' Board of Health.. HEBKON- Teachers.'. uontlngent School House— • HAIUUSON- Teachers Contingent School House Koad Cemetery Board of Health .. IKVINGTON- Teachers. Oontinguiit Uoad Board of Health. ., School House LEDYAKD- Teachers Contingent School House •'. I,E D Y A™ l) e i$ D EPENDENT- Teachers • Contingent , .School House ••••• •• LOTTS OKEEK- Teachers -. Contingent Koad Board of Health..... LU VERNE- Teachers Contingent School House Koad LU VEKNEINbEPENDENT- Teuchers Contingent Koad. . LINCOLN- Teachers Contingent — School House. PORTLAND— Teachers Contingent Koad Board ol Health. PLUM OKEEK— Teachers Contingent Road PKAIK1E- Teachers Contingent RAMSAY- Teachers Contingent— School House. Koad KlVERDAbE- Toacliers Contingent ... School House. Board of Health SHERMAN— Teachers Contingent Hostel Board of Health SPRING PIE LD' Teachers.. Contingent Koad... Board of Health- SENECA- Teachers Contingent Koad Cemetery SWEA- Teachers Contingent. School House Cemetery UNION" Teachc-rs Contingent School House Koiul Cemetery... Board of Health WJSSLEY- Teaohers... Contingent School House Road j$£a*E»T- Teaolievs,. Contingent School House Boad Cemetery Oit: Tiling WHtTTEWOUjj- TesLQhers Board of Health \VHITTEMOKE JNPBPJSNPENT Teachers,., ConttugjBBj SchoolTiouse Road Olty. WEST PJSNP- Trans-, .. ferred. S 144267 568 40 138 80 93 08 109 65 1212 90 03 08 7 04 20 82 148 5 90 46 149 90 117 98 40 25 86 70 170 0 105 49 49 28 107 20 99 24 77 04 75 64 100 64 113 12 141 58 112 43 125 02 124 22 Balance Tat). 1, 1895 Collec- 656 59 3208 23 2011 03 1895 05 1060 05 810 19 590 22 39400 5300 2257 119 29 83 50 488 80 195 67 273 81 34 96 183 79 30 85 59 32 Kff 93 229 48 94 98 94 H8 6 92 10 87 428 54 142 94 74 19 7 82 578 92 304 48 19 175 44 1C2 03 «1 47 28 08 11 182 11 33 02 53 82 15 75 39 426 11 142 02 220 .93 0'5 22 154 20 50 81 50 81 51 12 193 47 55 25 55 25 45.08 45 94 109 41 45 59 29 40 212 94 (i7 40 381 35 157 84 24 29 25 144 34 34 03 39 71 5 10 187 54 39 40 108 97 134 88 53 7T -22 39 ..3131 121 IS 53 03 56 75 Q7 128 39 73 38 91 73 29 74 415 09 10 45 1 94 138 06 23 38 6 15 9 84 8 27 92 08 47 86 10 64 114 45 38 00 38 21 56 12 49 13 5 10 301 05 79 07 158 71 98 09 202 43 50 75 101 27 59 73 20 15 tions. 8 UOTI 78 12270 68 2404 73 7778 83 1472 89 2135 36 425 80 248 01 C2 00 2857 59 1727 83 1720 43 2964 67 1059 26 1273 81 12 50 881 79 111 08 174 48 086 63 SCO 23 SOO 23 49 2!) 239 81 701 11 317 69 229 04 44 25 03 933 01 USfl 03 !H 87 30 30 340 22 031 13 8 81 100 30 14 (!J 230 27 59 81 185 42 951 11 219 22 1 59 97 38 951 79 270 30 2CO 34 15 38 40 00 636 87 330 15 220 24 380 15 573 40 153 15 151 57 228 59 282 14 146 01 170 13 114 59 748 83 260 48 C53 29 121 73 19 58 19 58 835 89 190 68 540 30 341 34 597 65 219 55 349 70 173 60 ' 62 91 '305 CO 102 58 1531 3,1 745 66 195 25 181 89 868'92 336 '79 351 85 :201 85 75 23 574 17 205 55 114 62 041 01 171 05 274 .54 216 09 860 47 359 54 27C 74 •' 27 71 991.40 315 45 392 23 211 27 210 92 18073 1224 38 22277 389 74 143 34 034 57 197 81 1 03 191 57 19 87 DlsbafS- ments. 778442 11605 04 .7838 1866 28 810 84 3359 Id 95 26 194 65 4260 32 1670 83 1636 04 3706 87 1162 95 1431 77 36 1130 47 132 23 193 91 914 03 400 24 406 24 1 48 234 01 1100 43 427 85 285 35 01 79 1057 88 931 29 R9 44 55 40 474 6 718 70 81 69 126 62 4 47 237 98 59 30 5 50 210 60 40 10 53 80 109 39 1343 45 380 38 220 93 315 05 13 57 1 38 851 07 343 69 250 06 222 10 828 83 193 17 193 14 259 68 359 14 170 45 145 60 134 04 913 70 311 14 990 79 264 28 42 99 . 47 1084 79 215 30 558 92 317 09 870 75 252 22 .419 01 302 13 1 88 ^35007 105 20 ,154 86 958 ; 59 227 85 224 28 1081 92 401 08 430 56 223 81 75 23 664 34 ' 268 93 238 19 60062 158 02 522 94 193 58 990 59 380 39 274 04 27 71 938 12 327 72 415 23 374 95 226 37 176 52 1055 19 296 50 540 07 234 03 221 45 50 08 ,101 29 230 80 39 57 Salftflce June 26,'95 288 62 3982 87 2327 36 3809 62 244810 13625 640 73 043 68 456 00' 53 00 1421 30 176 29 16889 254 96 91 OS 11585 47 10 70 91 9 70 39 89 30 93 95 14 48 97 48 97 54 73 10 87 5 25- 78 87 32 08 17 888 25 24 24 . 90 95 02 22 5 43 ' '4i'63 G8 16 8 59 7 70 10 28 7 64 22 11 51 179 86 1071 14 212 05. 1 55 374 39 130 91 '37 94 10 61 1 81 4408 70 38 43 27 20 99 0 17 61 43 15 23 13 68 13 99 . .45 94 82 06 21 15. 24 47 10 01 134 77 10 74 43 85 15 2!>- C7. 48 36 65 47 15 41 21 09 5 10 24 25 19 93 0 73 39 66 6 35 61 03- 58 58 19 77 29 89 75 5020 43 14 36 07 14 03 9 14 12 75 7 78 32 96 13 07 1 94 14 49 350 11 19 1& 31 44 30 78, 62 60 27 01 13 24 80 85 25 73 15-21 3402 33 68 9 31 43 67 5 94 8 38 7 40 741 17 191 88 1 01 14 50 45 V' -r

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