The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on May 17, 1966 · Page 11
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 11

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Algona, Iowa
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Tuesday, May 17, 1966
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Page 11
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Alfftfttt, (to.) ilfip* Be* MoifMK To****, May 17, SAN FRANCISCO - It's a long way in miles between Washington and San Francisco. But it's not far in ethical standards between the conduct of Sen. Tom Dodcl, Democrat, and that of the ex-mayor of San Francisco, now running for governor in the biggest state in the union. In fact, the record of George Christopher, Republican, puts Dodd, a Democrat, in the shade. Christopher, a big dairy operator, by trading on the fact that he is a Greek-American immigrant, has been yelling persecution in the same way Dodd claimed the communists are out to get him. He has so skillfully put himself in the role of the vilified underdog that anyone who reports the true facts is accused of McCarthyism. No later than March 30 of this year, Christopher's headquarters issued a letter signed by Arch Monson, Jr., as "Coordinator," warning editors to be on the alert against a smear of Christopher. This was an old dodge. It was practiced in 1962 when Christopher was running for lieutenant governor. I happen to be among those who were fooled by Christopher's earlier cries of smear. As a result, I reported favorably on hi s early campaigns' to become mayor of San Francisco. I was not only fooled but I believed it was a healthy demonstration of Americanism to elect as mayor of an important city a naturalized U. S. citizen born in Greece. Since that time many Americans of Greek descent have become disillusioned with Christopher's conduct and withdrawn their support, among them George C. Vournas, past president of ARE PA, and George E. Johnson of Sacramento, once one of Christopher's heaviest supporters. - o- CHRISTOPHER'S REAL RECORD- Carefull examination of the alleged "smear" shows that in real fact, Christopher has erected a smokescreen to prevent free and fair discussion of his career while simultaneously wanting to be elected to the highest office in his state. Believing that no election, under the American system, can be fairly held without free and fair discussion of the qualifications of all candidates, I have dug into Christopher's record. It shows conclusively that the candidate for governor: 1. Lied about his 1940 arrest in Marin County, in that he put $10,000 in kickbacks into his own pocket. He did not, as be claimed, try to sell milk cheaper "for the kids and mothers," 2, Distorted the truth about his 1943-44 conviction in San Francisco by claiming it stemmed from an "industrial hazard' 1 when in real fact he was warned 193 times, charging the watering of milk by as much as 20 percent; fijtby conditions at bis plant; and other violations. His conviction was part of this series of warnings extending over yearg, 3. Used his high office as mayor of San Francisco in selling to the schools, city consession- aires, and city licensees who were beholden to him. 4. Secured a draft deferment during World War n on the grounds that he was an agricultural worker, though at that very same time he was bilking the public and violating city and state health standards to build up a multimillion-dollar milk company. Those are some of the facts that Christopher has wanted to hush up. And this is why former Governor Goodwin "Goodie" Knight, an eminent and respected Republican, wrote Tom Storke, publisher of the Santa Barbara News-Press during the gubernatorial campaign of 1962: "George Christopher pled 'guilty in 1941 to extortion and was fined $5,000. His record is the worst I have ever seen and the Republicans in nominating him have made a basic blunder." - o- - HE FIRST CONVICTION— Mayor Christopher's first conviction took place when he was no juvenile, but 34 years old, an age when behavior patterns, are already set, and when voters have a right to examine those patterns in order to judge how a candidate will act if elected. Christopher had acquired the' Meadow Glen Dairy in Marin county where, along with every other dairy, he was subject to the California law which fixed the price of milk according to a milk marketing plan. In order to increase his profits, however, Christopher exacted kickbacks from farmers. If they would not kick back, he threatened, to refuse their milk. Naturally, they couldn't afford to let their milk spoil, so they paid Christopher on the side. While some other dairies did the same, Christopher's highhanded operation was described by C. J. Carey, chief of the California Agriculture Department's enforcement bureau, as the "most flagrant and defiant we have ever experienced." Finally one milk farmer, Charles J. Lane, had the courage to stand up to Christopher and in January, 1940, filed criminal charges. Later that year other farmers did likewise; so that Christopher faced charges of taking 57 separate kickbacks totaling $10,000. The man who now wants to be governor of California waived trial, pleaded guilty to ten counts, was fined $5,000 and was given two years in jail, which was suspended on condition that he stay out of the milk business for one year. More on hs record follows in an early column. - o - —VALENTI HITS JACKPOT- There was some interesting backstage byplay in the White House shortly before Jack Valenti, the President's dynamic and diminutive handyman, was given the lush plum of czar of the motion picture industry at a reported salary of $175,000 a year. The byplay took the form of downgrading the man on whom the President has leaned most, Bill D. Moyers, in favor of Valenti. Gladys Thul Of Bode Will Wed In June GLADYS THUL Mr. and Mrs. Harold Thul of Bode, Iowa, announce the engagement of their daughter, Gladys, to Russell D. Meyer, son of Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Meyer of Ringsted. The wedding is planned for June 18. Suddenly in earty April, for no apparent reason, Valenti was transformed from an errand boy to a policy maker. He was given most of the national security functions that Moyers originally had inherited from McGeorge Bundy, who retired to head the Ford Foundation. This made Walt Rostow, who had returned from the State Department to the White House to handle national security matters, Valenti's deputy. Valenti also presided over the White House meetings of Central Intelligence officials. The CIA's White House liaison man, Dick Helms, reported to Valenti. This strange realignment of White House responsibility had insiders puzzled. • It confused the State and Defense officials who had been dealing with Moyers. They received no notice that they should report to Valenti, though he obviously was taking over much of Moyer's responsibilities. Moyers, who has been doing an A-l job of handling White House press relations in addition to other side problems, did not protest the realignment of jobs. He is an old and faithful friend of the President. But some of the people close to Moyers did. - o - — PERSUASIVE PERSUASION— It was from this new setup that Valenti was suddenly catapulted into the job of czar of motion picture industry. What only the insiders know is that this was no accident. The appointment came on a direct suggestion, in fact after persuasive pressure to take Valenti. Johnson did this through Arthur Krim, president of United Artists, close to the White House and an important money-raiser for the Democratic party. LBJ also talked to Ed Weisl, lawyer for Paramount Pictures and chairman of the New York State Democratic Party. Motion picture producers are not regulated by government, but nevertheless, like to please the man at the top of the government. Even before Valentl's name was put in their hat, therefore, the motion picture producers had asked the President to pass on various candidates for movie czar. They had sent several names to the White House to make sure that the proposed "czars" were acceptable. Two were not. Their names were dropped. 1965 FORD GALAXIE 500, 4 dr. V-8, auto, trans., white sidewalls, white with red interior, one owner .. $2275 1964 PONTIAC CATALINA, 4 dr. V8, auto, trans., and power steering and power brakes $1895 1964 PONTIAC STAR CHIEF, 4 dr. V-8, auto, trans., Cruise Control, one owner, vinyl interior, dark blue with matching interior $2050 1964 PLYMOUTH Savoy V-8, AT 4 dr. R ft H, 1 owner. Good condition . $1495 1964 FORDS, Custom 500, 6 cyl., stick shift, R & H, wipers and washers priced $1295 to $1395 1963 FORD Custom 300, 2 dr., 6 cyl. with standard trans., heater, one owner — $995 1963 FORD Custom 300, 4-dr. V-8, auto, trans $795 1963 MERCURY Monterey 4 dr. V-8, AT, R & H, Turquoise with matching interior. 1 owner, Anyway you want to buy $1495 1963 FORU Galaxie, 4 dr. 6 cyl., standard trans., heater, one owner, like new, turquoise and matching ulterior $J095 1963 MERCURY Comet S22, 2 dr. hdtp., V-8, stick shift, AIR CONDITIONED, R & H, new tires, one owner, one of a kind $1295 1963 CHEVY H 300, 4 dr., 6 cyl., auto, trans., R ft H, like new $1175 1963 FORD Galaxie 500, 4 door, V-8, AT, R ft H, PS, 352 Engine ; $1495 1962 FORD Fairlane, 4 dr., V-8, AT, R ft H, light blue, one owner , .1962 CHEVROLET Biscayne Wagon, 6 Cyl. Stick, R ft H, One owner ..................................... $1095 1962 CHEVROLET Impala 4 dr. hardtop, 283 engine, full power, autumn gold ........................... $1396 1962 PLYMOUTH Savoy, 6 Cyl., AT, R ft H, runs good USED CARS 1961 OLDSMOBILE "88", 4 dr., R & H, stick shift . . $995 1961 MERCURY Meteor 800, 4 dr., R & H, auto, trans., .................................................. $795 1961 FALCON , 2 dr., 6 cyl., standard trans., R & H, complete overhaul ................................... $575 1961 PLYMOUTH Savoy, 4 dr., V-8, AT, heater, 50,000 actual miles .................................... $550 1960 PONTIAC Cataiina, 4 dr. wagon; V-8, AT, PS, PB, R & H, black with red interior, one of a kind . . $895 1959 DODGE Station Wagon, 9 passenger, R & H, Power Steering and Power Brakes . . ................... $335 1953 PLYMOUTH Station Wagon,' 6 Cyl. Stick. Runs good. ..................... ......... . ..................... $60 TRUCKS 1965 FORD ECONOLINE pickup, big 6 engine, one owner, actual miles .................................. $1595 1965 CHEVROLET 1% ton, 10 ft. stock and grain box, one owner, like new ................................. $2495 1964 CHEVROLET Vfc ton, pickup, 3 speed, 6 cyl., GOOD ............................................... ... $1395 1964 DODGE DIM Pickup, V-8 Engine, 3 Speed, Heater, Wide box ..... ; ................................. ^395 1963 CHEVROLET Vt ton pickup, V8, 4 speed, long box .................................................. $1395 19G2 FORD F-250 % ton V-8, 4 speed, long box .... $1295 1962 PONTIAC Station Wagon, Cataiina, 4 dr., R ft K, auto, trans., PS ft PB, a real family car ...... $1495 1982 OLDSMOBILE "88" 2 dr. hardtop, V8, stick shin, 1962 PONTIAC STATION WAGON, Cataiina, 9 passenger, new tires ........... ... ................ . ........ $1496 1962 CHEVROLET Impute *4r, sedan, V*, AT, PS, R ft H, one owner ................................. $1296 1960 FORD F-250 % ton PU, 6 cyl., 8 ply 3 speed ................. ........ , ............... $*& 1959 FORD F-350, 1 ton pickup with singles and 6x8 grain body, extra good ............................... $W6 1955 FORD F-250 % ton pickup, 4 speed, grain sides, runs , ........ ,,,,, ,., ..... ...,,., ........... $495 mm mt ei. PHONE 989-2843 FENTON, IOWA

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