The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on April 28, 1966 · Page 18
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 18

Publication:
Location:
Algona, Iowa
Issue Date:
Thursday, April 28, 1966
Page:
Page 18
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ID WESTERNER!... that's you • ~-~- A beautiful resort setting just 10 blocks from downtown... Exquisitely appointed rooms, suites, and apartments built around an acre of gardens. Air conditioning- and TV plus swinunhiy pool, cocktail lounge, coffee shop, beauty, barber shop and more, all at reasonable rates. £OS OUVOS. .. perfect jrfao* to f «c away from it a//. . .for a (fay, week, or month. FULL-COLOR FOLDER i ftc niJimo I nrlno YOURS FREE ... WRITE: LOS Ul IVOS LOUQC TvUphon*: (£02), AL S-69JI 202 EM* McDowill PHOENIX ARIZONA put a smile in every child's heart with rum* NSTMEC MMHIK he's a whopping 42" tall! , CLOWN! Almost life-sin to thrill every child ... he's a hilarious 42' tall! He talks, does ,11 kinds of tricks rt rturts! Howc£ resist this lovable character! He's a howM of ta and e— Ms words *re i delifht! Tow him la the iir, be bounces oa his bu ** - '5S5* ***** «"0** lewfe beading nd tittiw every «rert<M — iMMtinf somehow to always stty uprifM. He** cota* one* toe quality, nokM Mes, Met* easily. So/*** not put your little ring-master ia charge of this ckwniai Pfffenuwe! Brand new nut » terrific gift for every youtjstert "~ HUWARO HOUSI, in ma STUCT • NCTM MM* * tun by Forrest Peters May we introduce you to Sally and Jack Midwest Probably you know them already, since they live just down the road or across the street. The Midwests are average or typical people as determined by several recent surveys. We present them to you now in some detail, and we suspect that you will find the experience is like looking in a mirror. Sally and Jack live on a 303-acre farm with a total value of $40,000. Population studies show that the Midwests have one and one-fourth children, but Sally and Jack decided they did not want any fractional children so they have two. The Midwests have a lot of neighbors. There are over five million people living on mid western farms, and another ten million live in rural areas but do not farm. Of these neighbors, six and one-half million are under 20 years of age. There are also more than one and one-half million people over 65 living on farms and in rural non-farm areas. The increasing level of education is reflected with the Midwests. Sally has 10.8 years of schooling, and Jack has 10.3 years. Their family income varies, depending on where they live. Farm income on a recent year in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa and Missouri was $8,413. In North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska and Kansas it was $3,947, and in Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin it was $3,348. The Midwests subscribe to six magazines, have two radios and television! They take a daily newspaper and also the local weekly. Last year they spent $280 on food and tobacco, $340 on clothing, and another $210 on household items. Since food is a major item of expense, we shall tag along with Sally Midwest as she makes a grocery shopping trtp. As with more than half —51 per cent—of her neighbors, Sally shops on Friday. There are times, of course, when she also joins the 41 per cent who shop on Saturday. The shopping trip is a weekly affair for Sally, as it is with about 60 per cent of the rural-farm women. Sally goes to the supermarket, telling us that she selects a grocery store for its large and complete selection of groceries and secondly because of lower prices. Some 37 per cent of Sally's neighbors say that they buy most of their groceries at a small local grocery, and another 19 per cent buy theirs at a general store. Jack shops with Sally 19 per cent of the time, and does the grocery buying alone 15 per cent of the time. Yeast is an important item on Sally's shopping list, because like more than 80 per cent of the rural-farm women, Sally bakes her own bread. Sally also bakes pies and cakes, using a cake mix about three-fourths of the time. She also does some food canning at home, as do 75 per cent of the farm women, and 35 per cent of the urban women. The mechanization of rural life is reflected in Sally's house as well as in Jack's machine shed. She has a food mixer, refrigerator, food freezer, toaster, coffeemaker, electric frypan, washer and dryer, and a deep-fat fryer. And now we'll let Sally and Jack get back to work, because even with all the mechanical help, there is always more work to be done. Yes indeed, it f s just like looking in a mirror, isn't it? 1. Mrs. Alfred Noelke Washington, Mo. HOW DO YOU THINK A MIDWESTERN HOMEMAKER WOULD SPEND "EXTRA MONEY"? "¥T That would you do with an extra $1,000? * •» In learning about the average farm family, Farm and Home thought it might be interesting to ask Mrs. Midwest what she would do with an unexpected #1,000. Chances are, the answers are about what you would have given if we had asked you. To let you participate in our survey, we've made a matching game out of the #1,000 answers and the photos of the housewives who gave the answers. Get that pencil out of the cookbook drawer and see how good you are at analyzing your neighbor by the look in her eye. Match, the correct answer with the correct photo. A. Buy a food freezer. B. Take a trip to Hawaii. C. Visit daughter in Washington. D. Take family to Florida. E. Buy clothes dryer. F. Children's education fund, G. Invest in stocks. H. Pay bills. I. Go to Japan. J. Buy a home. K. Take a trip to California. 4. Mrs. Ernest Deaver Gurley, Neb. 7. Mrs. Ellis Anderson Verona, Wis. 10. Mrs. Owen Asbury Fayette, Mo, 2. Mrs. Eugene Snyder Sun Prairie, Wis. 5, Mrs. Robert Young Sidney, Neb. 8. Mrs. C. H. Hammond Sidney, Neb. 11. Mrs. Joanne Brewer Sun Prairie, Wis. 3. Mrs. Richard Taylor Fayette, Mo. 6. Mrs. P. J. Beyer Sidney, Neb. 9. Mrs. Isadore Rotar Madison, Wis. Answers to $1,000 matching game. 1-B 2-1 3-G 4-1 5-H 6-C 7-J 9-K 10*9 11-F

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